gunite

bdavis466

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
Aug 4, 2014
5,484
San Clemente, CA
TonyX3,

It seems like you are hearing what you want to hear and dismissing what you don't. The pool has major structural damage and is moving/settling for some unknown reason. Epoxy is a quick fix but it isn't going to hold a structurally compromised pool shell together for very long.

You've gotten some good advice thus far and I suggest you listen to it. There is no quick/inexpensive fix for this pool and any attempt will place the new homeowner in a dismal position later on.
 

TonyTonyTony

Active member
May 1, 2020
39
Huntsville
Tell us what the emgineer thinks or post his report and I'll review it
The Civil Engineer never returned my email, so the other day I followed up with a phone call to him. As it turned out he hadn’t seen the email. He was very nice and informative. He said, if it was a structural problem, it would have shown up before the pool was 2 years old. He said a 37 year old pool has settled all its going to settle. He said it cracked because of age not structure. He said it cracked and then it must have plenty of steel that picked up the weight. He said it cracked because of the weight differential. From the shallow end to the deep end there is a a constant slope. After the slope, there’s a significant drop to the deep end. This is where the cracks are. He said the weight of 10 feet of water was astronomical, and there was significantly more weight on the deep end then then the shallow end, and it was this change in weight that caused the pool to crack along the lines where the deepest end started. He said it could be fixed with 6000 psi epoxy. He said his firm has used that to even hold bridges up. He said with that epoxy, it would last another 37 years. He said. I could cut out the crack approximately eight inches on both sides of the crack, and two inches deep, to make a trough, and fill the trough up with the epoxy. He said this would make the surface smooth, and no one would stub their toe. But since it’s so deep, at the location of the crack, I think there’s not much chance of stubbing you toe, and just to fill the cracks up with epoxy would be okay, even if the bottom is a little rough. What do you think?
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
Without him being there to see it and a soil test that's an opinion. Yes epoxy is strong and it's used for many repairs. But 37 year old concrete is strong it gets better with age. Things can keep settling it may not be done. I have seen a pool shift from just a neighbor house being built and diverting underground water veins. My overall opinion is if I was possibly buying the house and knew the repair was done as a DIY I wouldnt trust it. Some people might overlook it amd just see a pool and not overthink it. Whatever you do just disclose the info to the buyer. With pics amd disclosure you have protection from a lawsuit down the road
 

bdavis466

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
Aug 4, 2014
5,484
San Clemente, CA
If the weight weight of the water cracked the pool, then that's a structural defect. The shell couldn't support the weight probably due to inadequate gunite thickness and/or lack of steel reinforcing.
 
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TonyTonyTony

Active member
May 1, 2020
39
Huntsville
Without him being there to see it and a soil test that's an opinion. Yes epoxy is strong and it's used for many repairs. But 37 year old concrete is strong it gets better with age. Things can keep settling it may not be done. I have seen a pool shift from just a neighbor house being built and diverting underground water veins. My overall opinion is if I was possibly buying the house and knew the repair was done as a DIY I wouldnt trust it. Some people might overlook it amd just see a pool and not overthink it. Whatever you do just disclose the info to the buyer. With pics amd disclosure you have protection from a lawsuit down the road
Where would I buy 6000 psi epoxy?
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
Supply house has it. Have you ever worked with epoxy? For this type of repair you need lots of manpower and mixing experience. You have minutes to mix and get the material it place. Not very DIY friendly
 

TonyTonyTony

Active member
May 1, 2020
39
Huntsville
Supply house has it. Have you ever worked with epoxy? For this type of repair you need lots of manpower and mixing experience. You have minutes to mix and get the material it place. Not very DIY friendly
Could you recommend a supply house where I could purchase 6000 psi epoxy. Also, could the epoxy be mixed in small batches, since as you say it has a short open time, and cut down on the needed manpower? The engineer said it was very liquid-ity. I could see myself slowly pouring it into the cracks. Do you see a problem with this?
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
epoxy is very hard to work with as a first timer. The supply house I use that carries it wont sell it to you, have to be a contractor. not something you want to ship, gotta do some looking around local to you. my limited experience is a one shot pour, I cant really comment or direct you on an epoxy repair. In my opinion this pool needs to be cored and soil sampled and after figuring out whats wrong with the engineer the pool would be stapled if that was appropriate and its salvageable
 

TonyTonyTony

Active member
May 1, 2020
39
Huntsville
epoxy is very hard to work with as a first timer. The supply house I use that carries it wont sell it to you, have to be a contractor. not something you want to ship, gotta do some looking around local to you. my limited experience is a one shot pour, I cant really comment or direct you on an epoxy repair. In my opinion this pool needs to be cored and soil sampled and after figuring out whats wrong with the engineer the pool would be stapled if that was appropriate and its salvageable
Contacted a cement contractor, but after learning it was a pool, he never returned any of my inquiries. Unfortunately, I can't snap my fingers and have qualified people for what you say I need. I am going to have to to the best I can.
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
13,308
Evans, Georgia
I wouldn't do anything recommended by a "pro" over the phone. Unless you have paid him for his services and he's willing to sign his name onto it as some sort of assurance to buyers, you have no idea what all is entailed. He may have left out a step in the conversation.

This sounds like a disaster in the making...getting worse!
 
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TonyTonyTony

Active member
May 1, 2020
39
Huntsville
Jimmythegreek, even though you state your supplier would not sell to me, could you post a link to their webpage. I would like to see what types of epoxy would be available, even though I could not purchase from them.
 

jimim

Bronze Supporter
Jun 20, 2016
2,795
NE/Pa
Why don’t u find few gunite pool contractors in ur area and get estimates. You are talking to a lot of people who don’t build gunite pools. My buddy is a commercial excavator and does commercial and residential footers and foundations and when I did my pool he said ya this is totally different.

talk to pool places that build gunite pools. Not fiberglass pools. Not vinyl pools.

those cracks look nasty though. My builder just repaired a gunite sheet with staples and other material.It looked like a pretty involved process.
 

jimmythegreek

TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
In The Industry
Aug 10, 2017
2,415
Morris Cnty NJ
They dont have a website. Imperial pool supply in Fairfield NJ. You order what you want its not a stocked item. If I needed it that day Brooklyn NY has a commercial Mason supply. Anything you want info on is all over the internet. It's not pool stuff you wont find it searching pool. Its concrete repair it doeant know what type of concrete its repairing ie footing, bridge, pool etc
 

TonyTonyTony

Active member
May 1, 2020
39
Huntsville
They dont have a website. Imperial pool supply in Fairfield NJ. You order what you want its not a stocked item. If I needed it that day Brooklyn NY has a commercial Mason supply. Anything you want info on is all over the internet. It's not pool stuff you wont find it searching pool. Its concrete repair it doeant know what type of concrete its repairing ie footing, bridge, pool etc
About 2 weeks ago I contacted this company to ask about their "pool patch". The CEO wrote back and I had several email exchanges with him.


The data sheet states it cures to 6400 psi in 28 days. I didn’t want to wait 28 days to refill the pool, and wrote to ask if they had product that cured faster.

He said they sold the same product at Leslie's Pools. It's manufactured by the same company, but sold at Leslie's under their brand.


Thus far, this is all I have been able to find.

I have written to an adhesives manufacturer, but have not heard back from them