For you pool owners with dogs that shed...

ktdave

LifeTime Supporter
May 8, 2007
888
Katy, TX
My pool is currently being built and I have two dogs that may or may not be using the pool with us (I actually will be shocked if they don't). I have been concerned with the amount of hair that will be going into the pool. I know skimmer socks will help keep the hair from going into the filter, but I've also been concerned with swimming with the hair in the water before it gets pulled into the skimmers. So I decided to look into getting some sort of de-shedding tool for our dogs and while I was at PetCo, I was standing there looking at some of these items and a lady out of nowhere started telling me how great this particular product was. It's called the Furminator. It's kind of pricey (~$50) for a "dog brush" but the lady said it's way worth it, so I was convinced.

I got the thing home and started going to town on the dogs, and Man! I think I pulled enough hair off of them to fill the bed of my pick-up! The dogs looked like they lost ten lbs each. It's been probably two weeks sinc I've done this and our floors in the house that are usually covered with dog hair tumbleweeds are pretty much hairless.

Big thumbs up for the FURMINATOR! (said with Arnold Shwartzeneger accent) :goodjob:
 

SeanB

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Now, there's an equipment review I never thought I'd see. :lol:

I wonder how it would work on short haired dogs. We have a pug, and despite the old rumor that short haired dogs don't shed, she sure does! It's just not the very visible long hair you have with other breeds. I may have to check out the furminator.
 

DrC

Well-known member
May 9, 2007
87
Ohio
Dogs and Pools go Together :)

I have 3 Labardor Retrievers and my son has an additional one. I have had Labs for a K9 partner since 1993. Only 2 currently enjoy the pool with permission. We have at times had then in the pool off and on over a full weekend with no real problems. The skimmer basket catches most of the hair that manages to float that way with only little making it to the pump basket or filter. To check this I did clean filter cartdridge prior to and after letting the dogs play in the pool. I didn't know or use skimmer socks at that time but will this year and guess no hair will get past skimmer. HOWEVER, don't be surprised in the morning when you get up you see what appears to be some type of furry crteature in the bottom of the pool. Upon closer examination after removing the creature with the leaf net, you will then realize how much hair the dogs left in the pool in that fuzz ball.

It isn't a problem for us at all and we enjoy them retrieving items from the pool. We have taught them to only enter and exit at the ladder (Steps this year). I had also purchased a ramp that assist them getting out from Speciality Pool Products that helps but could be bigger. This way they do not scratch or tear the vinyl liner.

Enjoy your Pool and Dogs
 

kirbinster

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2007
293
NJ
I have three Siberian Huskys that love the pool. I don't think any dog in the world sheds more than they do - and it has never been a problem for the pool.
 

ktdave

LifeTime Supporter
May 8, 2007
888
Katy, TX
The dog of mine that sheds the most is a husky/golden retriever mix she even has the curled up bushy tail.


Our other dog is a yellow lab (male).


kirbinster,
That is good to know that your dogs haven't caused you any problems.
Thanks,
Dave
 

TripleB4me

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 4, 2007
224
Maryland
ktdave said:
My pool is currently being built and I have two dogs that may or may not be using the pool with us (I actually will be shocked if they don't). I have been concerned with the amount of hair that will be going into the pool. I know skimmer socks will help keep the hair from going into the filter, but I've also been concerned with swimming with the hair in the water before it gets pulled into the skimmers. So I decided to look into getting some sort of de-shedding tool for our dogs and while I was at PetCo, I was standing there looking at some of these items and a lady out of nowhere started telling me how great this particular product was. It's called the Furminator. It's kind of pricey (~$50) for a "dog brush" but the lady said it's way worth it, so I was convinced.

I got the thing home and started going to town on the dogs, and Man! I think I pulled enough hair off of them to fill the bed of my pick-up! The dogs looked like they lost ten lbs each. It's been probably two weeks sinc I've done this and our floors in the house that are usually covered with dog hair tumbleweeds are pretty much hairless.

Big thumbs up for the FURMINATOR! (said with Arnold Shwartzeneger accent) :goodjob:
We use this as well and like you've said it does work great. The $50 size is now on sale for $35 until the 16th at Petco.
 

ChrisL

Well-known member
Apr 3, 2007
97
If you do not mind a suggestion, if the dog might have access to the pool when you are not around, the FIRST thing I do with a dog is show it where the steps are. I get the dog in the water and lead it to the steps. I Do this several times. You may want to force the dog into the pool and show it where the steps are. Dogs may drown if they jump in when you are not around and do not know where the steps are. It is not intuitive for them. I had a dog that loved to swim. Once I showed her how to get in and out, she would go in for a lap all the time, with or without us. Our current dog does not like to go in at all, but i also showed him how to swim to the steps a few times (he was not happy).
 

AnnaK

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 15, 2007
1,138
Eastern Pennsylvania
ChrisL said:
If you do not mind a suggestion, if the dog might have access to the pool when you are not around, the FIRST thing I do with a dog is show it where the steps are.

That's really excellent advice!

Dogs generally will exit a body of water at the same place they went in. If you introduce a dog to the pool by the steps s/he will most likely go back to the steps to get out. Once they know where the exit is, they can jump (or dive, like one of mine) off the sides and will usually swim back to the steps or the ramp.

When I have friends and their dogs visiting, I insist that they go in the water with their dogs to supervise the exiting. We had 7 GSDs in the pool on Independence Day. It got kind of rowdy :)
 

kimrst

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 15, 2007
108
West Michigan
We used the Furminator on the cats just before the Graduation Party. It was amazing. I had tried the Shed Ender and that was pretty much worthless. We also had a curry comb type brush that did a fair job on the old dog. But the Furminator was awesome on the fluffy cat and the short haired cat. I got my small one from PetsPlus and paid and arm & leg for it. QVC had the bigger brushes for less than the small size or cat version. The dog is in doggy heaven but if we had one we'd be using the Furminator on it too. The hair that comes off the animals is unbelievable. Kimrst
 

rockbottom

Member
Jul 3, 2007
8
South Carolina
Here is another vote for the Furminator. Wife picked one up about a month ago and I was amazed at the amount of hair we could brush off of our Jack Russel, who by the way loves the pool.
 

kolbajen

Active member
Sep 28, 2007
35
Austin, Texas
I have to have the Furminator! We have two Australian Shepherds that swim non-stop. No problem with the fur in the pool. It's the house that drives me crazy. Thanks for the review!
 

SeanB

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
I finally used one of these when my mom brought it over for her dog. We have a pug (short hair), but it still did a great job. It felt almost like it was pulling the hair as I went, but she didn't seem to mind and it did do a good job.

I don't think it removed anymore hair than the rubber fingered brush which is ideal for short haired dogs, but it did do a much better job of capturing the hair so it wasn't floating all over the place.
 
G

Guest

well i would love to get one, but my dogs never swim, i mean they will swim in the coffie and cream lake behind our house but not the crystal clear blue sparkling water.
 

ivyleager

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 6, 2007
496
Raleigh-Durham,NC
Rollin Thunder said:
well i would love to get one, but my dogs never swim, i mean they will swim in the coffie and cream lake behind our house but not the crystal clear blue sparkling water.
How true!!!! Their thought process must be: 'how stinky and filty can I possibly get'.

We have a springer spaniel who loathes going into the pool; will drink from it or sit on the steps to cool off in the water, but WILL not swim out into the pool unless encouraged with delectible treats (watermelon is her favorite). However, get this girl out in the field, and she will charge into the water with absolute abandon!

CaryB
 

msteff

Member
Oct 10, 2007
8
I am getting a 20x40 IG vinyl lined pool installed this spring. We have two 100 pound labs that love the water. I am really nervous to let swim in the pool for fear of them puncturing the liner. The pool will be a standard dive pool so 3.5 by 8 foot deep. I'm guessing they would not be able to touch the bottom anywhere. Damage would only occur if they tried to get out at one of the walls. Is my fear unfounded?
 

AnnaK

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 15, 2007
1,138
Eastern Pennsylvania
msteff,

Yes. You needn't worry about liner damage. One of ours 'walks' rather than swims. He's old and his rear doesn't work well enough for swimming so he pounds the water with his front paws and walks on his hind legs. No damage. Nor any damage from dogs belonging to friends who tried to clamber out the sides.

Just show your dogs the steps so they know how to get out, help them out the first couple of times, and you're all set.