First Water Test - Now Taylor 2006C

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
Hi everyone,

I ordered this test kit before I joined here and started reading the advice. Should I scrap it completely and order the recommended Taylor?
Or can I use this kit on most days and the more expansive testing 1 or 2 times per week?

Here are the result I got:

FC 0.6
CC 0.0
Bromine 0.0
pH 7.2
TA 110

I have been having a very small amount of algae bloom on the floor of the pool which I have been sweeping each day.
I only have the puck Cholorine tabs in one of those floating duck things. :)

What should my first step be?
PoolMath App recomments 147 oz of 6% Bleach Chlorine for my approx 29,500 Gal pool

MattyJ
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
May 3, 2014
15,895
Laughlin, NV
Welcome to the forum!
The issue with your kit is that you cannot test CYA nor FC above 5 ppm I believe.
With algae, you need to SLAM. To do that, you need a proper test kit to measure your CYA and be able to test higher levels of FC.
First step is to add 5ppm FC worth of liquid chlorine per day until you get the test kit. Once you can test your water chemistry, post them up here and we can provide guidance.

I suggest you read ABC's of Pool Water Chemistry and consider reviewing the entire Pool School eBook.
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
Based on the Calc I added 2 jugs of 121 oz 6% bleach today.
And I ordered the Taylor K-2006C kit.

Thanks for the advice and I'll post my updates as I get them.
 

Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Jun 12, 2009
3,418
NW Ohio
Mostly stop using it, but don't completely scrap it when you get your 2006c.

First, the 5-way is a bit of a lie. It tests for Total Chlorine, Total Bromine, pH, Acid Demand, and Total Alkalinity. Well, acid demand is just an additional step of the pH test and not all that useful. Next the chlorine and bromine test is the same test and you will only be testing for one or the other. So it's really just a 3 way kit when you get down to it.

Don't use the pH test once you have your 2006c, it's pretty unreliable when your FC is above 3. I speak from experience. I would, however, hold on to the chlorine test. You can't accurately test FC and CC with it, but once you get things dialed in pretty well and are getting the hang of it it is useful for a quick "yep, there is still chlorine in there" for a day or two between using the 2006c test.
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
First, the 5-way is a bit of a lie. It tests for Total Chlorine, Total Bromine, pH, Acid Demand, and Total Alkalinity. Well, acid demand is just an additional step of the pH test and not all that useful. Next the chlorine and bromine test is the same test and you will only be testing for one or the other. So it's really just a 3 way kit when you get down to it.
Yea I wondered about this when the FC and TC test were: "within 2-3 seconds compare color with chlorine standards on left to determine the Free Chlorine ppm level." and then "Wait 1-2 minutes and compare again to determine the combined chlorine ppm level."
In this case the color didn't change over time which is why I stated CC was 0.
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
Yesterday I added 121 oz of 6% bleach and tested at FC 3.0

This morning's tests (Still from the Pool Master 22270)

FC 2.5
CC 0.0
pH 7.4
Temp 77

Added 121 oz of 6% bleach
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
First round of testing with the Taylor kit:

FC 3.0
CC 0.2
pH 7.4
TA 150
CH 510 - 51 drops, should I repeat using the "When high CH is anticipated" method?
CYA estimating 250 (high) as I wasn't able to add very much to the dot sight test before it disappeared. Is there another test for high levels to get on the chart?
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
May 3, 2014
15,895
Laughlin, NV
100 is the limit of the CYA test, so you have to do a diluted test. Mix 50% pool water with 50% tap water. Use this mixed sample as your test water. Multiply the result by 2 for your CYA level.

Hold off on doing the CH test again. CYA this high will need an extensive drain/refill.
 

Rancho Cost-a-Lotta

Silver Supporter
Apr 10, 2018
697
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
CH 510 - 51 drops, should I repeat using the "When high CH is anticipated" method?
When you do test CH again, use a 10 ml sample. Use 10 drops of R-0010, 3 drops of R-0011L and multiply the number of R-0012 drops by 25 to get your CH level. You'll save on reagents.

More detailed test instructions can be found here: Extended Test Kit Directions Archives - Trouble Free Pool

Great choice on getting a good test and sticking around!
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
100 is the limit of the CYA test, so you have to do a diluted test. Mix 50% pool water with 50% tap water. Use this mixed sample as your test water. Multiply the result by 2 for your CYA level.

Hold off on doing the CH test again. CYA this high will need an extensive drain/refill.
I did the diluted test and still did not get half way to the 100 mark. o_O
Time to order a 100' backwash hose... this will end up good as I was wanting to replace / confirm that I had fresh DE in the filter.

How do I determine what % of the pool needs to be drained?

Also, I'm working on reviving the SWG as the cell appears to be good, the flow sensor was shot (cable was torn / bitten) and the control board was not readable.
I have a new flow sensor and new control board and everything is powering up. I ordered the reagents to do the Sodium Chloride Test.

My replacement control board shows r-1.40 and i see that newest is r-1.59 I didn't get the option to select the T cell and I have the T-15.
Do I need to be worried that the board won't handle my cell correctly?
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
May 3, 2014
15,895
Laughlin, NV
I would suggest doing a nearly complete drain. Is it safe for you to drain in your area? No nearby surface water, etc? You do not want your plaster to dry out in the sun. Also, you will not be able to backwash this water out. You need to get a sump pump.

I have a water exchange process if you would rather do that than rent a pump to drain.
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
I would suggest doing a nearly complete drain. Is it safe for you to drain in your area? No nearby surface water, etc? You do not want your plaster to dry out in the sun. Also, you will not be able to backwash this water out. You need to get a sump pump.

I have a water exchange process if you would rather do that than rent a pump to drain.
I'll double check with the City to see if any special process is needed; a main river that supplies most of the agricultural water in the area runs very near our neighborhood. A neighbor down the street appears to have rented a pump / paid a service to do this for them this past week. They were pumping directly to the curb.
I'm much closer to the sewer drains so that will be less disruptive than this house was. :)

What is the water exchange process? I'd like to read it just in case.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
May 3, 2014
15,895
Laughlin, NV
You can exchange some water without draining.

If you place a low volume sub pump in the deep end and pull water from there while adding water in the shallow end (through a skimmer or into a bucket on a step so you lessen the water disturbance) you can do a fairly efficient exchange. That is assuming the water you are filling with is the same temperature or warmer than your pool water. If your fill water is much cooler than your pool water, then switch it. Add the water to the deep end (hose on bottom) and pull water from the top step.

The location of the pump and fill hose may change if you have salt water, high calcium, etc.
In my pool, with saltwater and high calcium when I drain, I put the pump in the deep end and hose in shallow end. The water in the pool weighs more per unit volume than the fill water from the hose.

Be sure to balance the water out and water in so the pool level stays the same. Also be sure your pool pump is disabled during this process. Once started do not stop until you have exchanged the amount of water you wish.

 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
Also, I'm working on reviving the SWG as the cell appears to be good, the flow sensor was shot (cable was torn / bitten) and the control board was not readable.
I have a new flow sensor and new control board and everything is powering up. I ordered the reagents to do the Sodium Chloride Test.

My replacement control board shows r-1.40 and i see that newest is r-1.59 I didn't get the option to select the T cell and I have the T-15.
Do I need to be worried that the board won't handle my cell correctly?
Any thoughts on this aspect of my post?

I replaced the display board, but not the main board.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
13,869
The main board has the software. So, changing the display board won't change the software revision.

r-1.40 takes only a T-15. So, you're ok there.

If the voltage is 30 when not generating and at least 24 when generating, the board is probably ok.

If the instant salinity is accurate when generating, everything is working correctly.
 

MattyJ

Member
May 11, 2019
22
Reedley, CA
The main board has the software. So, changing the display board won't change the software revision.

r-1.40 takes only a T-15. So, you're ok there.

If the voltage is 30 when not generating and at least 24 when generating, the board is probably ok.

If the instant salinity is accurate when generating, everything is working correctly.
Voltage when not generating is 32.7 and was around 27 when generating.
I have not tested the salinity (reagents on order) but would assume there is not normal SWG levels in the water as the SWG was installed by the first owner, but the second owner said it didn't work and he never used it.
I'll report back after I get my test results.
 

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