First time pool owner. Is an inspection worth it?

Moneypits

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2017
84
Greenville SC
Hello! I have an offer in on a home that has an inground pool. (I do not know the gallons yet.) I'm not a big fan of them as I've never used one much, they seemingly require constant maintenance, draw additional power, increase home owner's insurance, and require expensive chemicals all for something I personally won't be using all that often.

However with all that said I love the house and who knows since I'm in SC where its miserably hot during the summer, I may fall in love with it and find the cons minimal come 95 degree weather. My question is a pool inspection worth it for a pool that isn't covered? According to the owner, he did not winterize the pool and has simply kept the pumps running constantly. The liner (not sure of material yet) and the pump are new. The brand is Hayward but I have not made note of the exact model. The pool is not a green frog pond and the water is blue but there does seem to be quiet a bit of sediment along the bottom. Is it worth it to have the pool inspected if the liner is intact and the pump equipment is new? What else beyond that is there for an inspector to check? If the water conditions themselves have been neglected (which I'm sure they have been) I'm going to be buying the testing kit and finding that info out myself anyway.

I've already been pricing the robots that vacuum along the bottom. How long do these need to operate? Anyone have an opinion on the best bang for the buck model? Thanks for any info!
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
37,493
Tallahassee, FL
Even if the seller says the equipment is in working order I would still have it inspected. BUT you need to find someone that KNOWS pools instead of just a general inspector.

We can teach you how to care for your pool with your own test kit and chemicals bought from Walmart! No pool store stuff needed. Here is what we use in our pools:

Pool School - Recommended Pool Chemicals

You do not need all of the stuff listed so don't go buying it. What you will need depends on your test results. For now do look for a source for liquid chlorine/bleach. I get mine from the ACE hardware up the road. Others get theirs from the pool store. Some find the plain, store brand bleach is the easiest for them. It all depends on what is close and easy for you to pick up.

Kim:kim:
 

triptyx

TFP Guide
Apr 12, 2016
1,495
Tucson, AZ
YES

Get a dedicated pool inspector (ask your REALTOR). Mine evaluated all of the equipment for functionality, tested/manipulated the valves and told me what they did, reviewed the state of the plaster and cool deck, ran the heater, etc. etc. I got lucky, in that my home inspectors were there at the same time and they even stopped and asked my pool inspector questions about what they should look for, etc (they also offered a pool inspection as part of the home inspection, but I wanted a separate, specialist inspector). He told me about my returns, that there was an autofill and that it was maladjusted (set a bit too high), and that I had a suction port. He was worth every last penny.
 

borjis

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 19, 2014
2,705
Pacific NW
I have had pool inspections at both homes I've purchased. It doesn't cost much and definitely worth it in my opinion.
 

gwegan

TFP Expert
Apr 19, 2013
2,769
Sacramento, CA
You apparently have a vinyl liner pool. You absolutely want a pool inspection. Many liner pools have metal, plastic or wood behind the vinyl liner. Those all have risks of failure if not maintained. A good inspector can see and alert you to possible structural problems with the walls that you will not be able to recognize.

He can tell you if the pump really is in good shape and if its hooked up correctly. He can tell you if its the wrong pump for your needs. He can tell the actual condition of the plumbing, filter and other items on the equipment pad. He can explain how it all functions. He can tell you how the pool is built and may even be able to tell you the condition of the walls. -- if they are metal are they rusted or corroded, if wood are they rotting. If hes good he may be able to tell if the pool is properly bonded against electrical shock and if other electrical components are up to code. He can tell you if the suction system (drain) complies with current code. And a whole bunch more.
 

mac4lyfe

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 8, 2007
212
Houston, Texas
I think I paid $100 for an inspection in Houston 12 years ago. I was not in favor of a pool at first either. My wife wanted one so we ended up with one. I knew right away that I would be the pool boy. I love having the pool, especially in the super hot summer months. We get in the pool every day and it is so refreshing after a long day at work. This website has been an invaluable resource where I have learned so much through the years. I recommend walking with the inspector and ask plenty of questions including making sure you label all your lines.
 

Paul & Crystal

Silver Supporter
May 25, 2014
539
Oklahoma City, OK
We just purchased a home with an existing pool. We did get an inspection. We were going through with the deal regardless of the pool condition, but it was still good to know where we stood. We bought a warranty on both the house and the pool at the time of closing. It cost around $900 for a year of coverage on both and we felt more reassured, especially about the pool. If you use the TFP method, you will learn so much, have lots of fun, make new friends, and save money!

Keep us posted on your new adventure!

Crystal
 

Geebot

Well-known member
Aug 19, 2013
727
We just purchased a home with an existing pool. We did get an inspection. We we're going through with the deal regardless of the pool condition, but it was still good to know where we stood. We bought a warranty on both the house and the pool at the time of closing. It cost around $900 for a year of coverage on both and we felt more reassured, especially about the pool. If you use the TFP method, you will learn so much, have lots of fun, make new friends, and save money!

Keep us posted on your new adventure!

Crystal
We also have the home/pool equipment warranty. Covers pump/heater. As for homeowner's insurance, ours barely noted the pool/diving board (and told us there were no increased costs). They just wanted to make sure we had the proper fence/security.
 

EmilyOTR

Bronze Supporter
Feb 15, 2017
337
Ferndale, MI
barging in here, as I just bought a house with a pool, but it's closed for the winter so we could not have an inspection. I trust the homeowners, however, we have already purchased the house, but should I still get a pool inspector after we open the pool?
 

Cmasty

Well-known member
May 15, 2016
54
Tulsa, ok
I paid over 150 for a pool inspection, and while the tour of my pool was interesting and helpful, the inspection factor was nearly worthless.

Inspectors really wont stake a claim on much these days because they want no liability. "Yep, its a pool".

If it were me, I'd get the current homeowner to prove to you that the parts work (show you via a tour of the pool pad, etc). In addition, request that the current homeowner write the pool's general condition including status of pool plumbing, pumps and water holding (no leaks) ability on your state's conditions and disclosure form. This is much more valuable and provides you much more recourse (if ever needed) than an inspection.
 

Uncle Salty

Gold Supporter
Feb 3, 2017
239
South Carolina
You will appreciate the pool living in SC as it's miserably hot here. If I was buying a house with a pool I'd definitely get an inspection for a couple hundred bucks it'll give you a piece of mind. I think you'll find following the TFP method it won't be as much work as you think, do some reading up and here and ask these guys and gals any questions you may have and they'll help you through anything. Let me be the first to say, do yourself a favor and order the TF-100 test kit if you do purchase the pool with a house.

Salty
 

mac4lyfe

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 8, 2007
212
Houston, Texas
barging in here, as I just bought a house with a pool, but it's closed for the winter so we could not have an inspection. I trust the homeowners, however, we have already purchased the house, but should I still get a pool inspector after we open the pool?
Too late now. You just have to hope everything is in working order. If you are not real familiar with the equipment, I might recommend finding a local pool cleaning company. Basically a local pool boy that can come by and clean the pool. They should know the status of your equipment and should give you a tour of what you have. I broke my ankle and was immobile for 4 months. I found a good company here in Houston that came by once a week to clean it up and add chemicals. I basically told them not to add anything but acid because I have a SWG that maintains FC level but the PH drifts. They did a great job cleaning up all the leaves and debris that get in my pool, which was the main reason I hired them. Once someone shows you the ropes, you should be able to take it from there with plenty of help of folks here.
 

gwegan

TFP Expert
Apr 19, 2013
2,769
Sacramento, CA
I'm all to familiar with the worthless home inspection racket.

But if you get a pool inspector to inspect there are numerous important facts you can determine. Not a home inspector but a pool inspector.

This is more important with liner pools because you need to understand how they are built and how they age to determine what kind of shape they are in. But a real pool pool guy can tell you a lot about a gunite pools condition.

Whether the pool is compliant with drains is very important and a pool inspector can tell you that. Same with bonding.
 
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