Filling up pool for the 1st time

ellislo

Well-known member
Pool: 32’ x 16’ x 52” (55,000L)

Filling my pool for the first time. The following sequence correct?
  1. FC: SWG - Waterco Hydrochlor MK3 3000 (30g/hr)
  • Recommended TDS levels (ppm) by manufacturer (min = 4,000 Optimum = 5,500 Max = 6,000)
  • Based on Pool Math, I need 300kg (12 x 25kg/bag) to get the salt level from 0 to 5,500 ppm.
  1. Adjust CYA to 70-80
  2. Run pump for 4hrs/day, set SWG to medium, monitor FC within 4-6 ppm.
  3. Adjust TA to 70 ppm.
  4. Adjust PH to 7.5 PH.
  5. Adjust CH to > 50 ppm & < 300 ppm.
  6. Adjust Borate to 40 ppm.

My question:
  1. How much of each of the following chemical required to maintain the pool chemistry, assuming the supply can last for a month:
  • FC: salt (kg)
  • CYA: Cyanuric Acid (kg)
  • TA: baking soda (kg)
  • PH: muriatic acid (L)
  • CH: calcium chloride (kg)
  • Borates: Borax (kg)
 

JJ_Tex

Bronze Supporter
Jul 17, 2019
1,179
Prosper, TX (DFW)
What type of finish is your pool? If it is plaster/pebble, you need to wait on the salt for 30 days while it cures.

Also, I dont think you need to worry about borates until you have the rest of your pool figured out and stable for several months.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
ellislo, I think you have some good info, but there are a few things I would comment on:
- With an Intex (vinyl) pool, you can add the salt for the SWG, but you may have a learning curve for the first few days, so I would have some liquid chlorine (regular bleach) handy just in case you need it.
- The pH and TA numbers sound good, but in reality you won't know their "ideal" place until the pool is full and operates for a few days. Many salt pools seem to like a pH around 7.7-7.8, so if that happens to you, don't fight it. Same with the TA. It may do well at 70, or may like 60 better. But watch it closely for the first week or two and you'll see a pattern.
- As JJ noted, I would hold-off on the borates until you are positive the basic water chemistry is consistent.
- I have to ask ..... above you mention both the TDS and salt level recommended at 5,500. Is that correct? I don't usually see SWGs with such a high salt level, just wanted to confirm.
- Speaking of TDS ..... that's a term we don't give much attention to here at TFP. Somewhat irrelevant for most pools. I wouldn't be too concerned about it.
- For your last question ... the amount required varies and is based on your ideal target levels and using the PoolMath tool to help confirm the correct dosage. In my signature you'll see the TFP Recommended Levels link, so you can use that as well to help guide your dosages.

Hope this helps.
 

ellislo

Well-known member
Thank you @JJ_Tex @Texas Splash !

I enclosed the brochure and manual for the SWG that I am getting. You can find the recommended salt level in there. Hope you can give me some advice base on that.

For my last question, normally how much of all these chemical that you keep in stock at home for the purpose of pool chemical maintenance, assuming that the balanced pool chemistry already achieved.
 

Attachments

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
I would go with the the manual states for the salt level. Each manufacture is a bit different. Use TFP recommended levels for everything else. As for chemicals on-hand, with a SWG you should only need a couple things right now. Maybe a gallon or two of regular bleach until you know the SWG is working properly, and some muriatic acid (MA) to control pH if/when it gets too high (say 8.0 or more). The bleach can stay in your laundry room, but the MA needs to be outside away from everything - especially kids, pets, and metal products (corrosion). Many folks here place their MA in a separate rubber/plastic trash can or storage container. It will be fine outside in the heat or cold. If your TA ever gets low, you'll use baking soda, but you just grab that at any time from the grocery store.
 
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ellislo

Well-known member
Thanks for the advice @Texas Splash ! Will grab some bleach (Clorox should be ok?) and baking soda.
I am having a difficulty in getting muratic acid locally, but manage to find dry acid. I read that for SWG, muratic acid is preferred. Will there be any issue if I use dry acid instead?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
18,090
Northern NJ
Thanks for the advice @Texas Splash ! Will grab some bleach (Clorox should be ok?) and baking soda.
I am having a difficulty in getting muratic acid locally, but manage to find dry acid. I read that for SWG, muratic acid is preferred. Will there be any issue if I use dry acid instead?
Read the label on your Clorox bleach. In the US almost all Clorox bleach contains additives and is not OK for pool use.

If you buy household bleach, you want pure liquid chlorine with no additives. Additives such as fragrances, thickeners (splashless), or surfactants (outdoor bleach) may cause foaming. Bleach with fabric protectors (chloromax technology) may also cause foaming.

Most Clorox bleach today says it had Cloromax Technology. They are polymers that create foaming and are not suitable for pools. Clorox Germicidal Bleach appears to not have additives.


Dry Acid
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
18,090
Northern NJ
So muratic acid is the way to go....

btw, found this Clorox at my local supermarket
View attachment 123065
And I checked with the local distributor on the ingredients and they provided the following link:
Ingredients Inside | The Clorox Company

so can I use this product?
Best not to use that. The polymers cause foaming that you do not want in pool water.

Polyquaternium-6Polyquaternium-6, also known as polyDADMAC (polydiallyldimethylammounium chloride) is a polymer of a quaternary ammonium salt typically used as a coagulant in water treatment and purification or as a film-forming or antistatic agent in cleaning and personal care formulations.
 

ellislo

Well-known member
when I first fill up the pool, do I need to care about the existing FC level in the water? Or I just pour in 300kg salt to get to the SWG recommended level, in my case, 5500 ppm? Or shall I check the existing FC level, then slowly add in salt while monitoring the FC level until I get to the recommended FC level 4-6ppm? but will the recommended FC level of 4-6ppm achieved at the same time as the salt level of 5500ppm?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
18,090
Northern NJ
The amount of salt you add does not directly affect your FC level. It takes the running of your SWG to convert the salt into FC.

When you add salt to the pool your SwG should be off. Then let the pump run for 24 hours to dissolve the salt. Then you can turn in your SWG and adjust the settings for its chlorine output.

SWG generates chlorine slowly so you test FC and make SWG chlorine generation adjustments slowly until you have a stable FC level.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Found this bleach with 25-30% Sodium Hypochlorite and 1% Sodium Hydroxide. Can it be used?
Wow. 25% or more? That's pretty strong stuff. So make sure to use the PoolMath tool for your dosage amount. Also keep in mind that the other ingredient (Sodium Hydroxide) may influence your pH and cause it to rise a bit. So watch that as well.
 

ellislo

Well-known member
So far I manage to find the following chemicals locally:
1. Chlorine - bleach (25-30% Sodium Hypocloride and 1% Sodium Hydroxide)
2. Hydrochloric Acid (muriatic acid)
3. Soda Ash
4. Calcium Chloride
5. Salt

but can't find the following, so I think I have to make do without both of these chemicals.
1. cyanuric acid
2. borates

I am now waiting for my Lamotte 7022 to arrive before I setup my pool.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
No borates is okay, but you really need the cyanuric acid (stabilizer). It's important for two reason: 1) Without CYA, the bleach is not buffered at all and very strong; 2) It protects the chlorine from the sun UV. With no CYA, chlorine is oxidized very quickly. Can you order some online?
 

ellislo

Well-known member
I have spoken to a pool store, was told that the chlorine tablet that they are selling content cyanuric acid. So I think I will have to use the tablet for its cyanuric acid together with my SWG. Need some experiment, trial and error to dial in on the SWG setting and also the tablet chlorine dosage in order to get enough of FC and CYA in the pool.
 

AusPhil

Well-known member
Jan 23, 2018
181
Canberra ACT
I have spoken to a pool store, was told that the chlorine tablet that they are selling content cyanuric acid. So I think I will have to use the tablet for its cyanuric acid together with my SWG. Need some experiment, trial and error to dial in on the SWG setting and also the tablet chlorine dosage in order to get enough of FC and CYA in the pool.
I noticed you have the 32x16 intex listed as 55,000 litres which is the manufacturers water volume.... if it's anything like my 24x12 Bestway it won't take that much ... mine is 30k at 90% specced and around 26.5k measured 1" from spilling over ... i'd guess the 55k will be closer to 47/48 for chemical calculations and actual volume

it's important to have the volume close especially if your trying to juggle tabs to get cya in
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,767
Central California
If you haven't filled your pool yet, then I'm not too late! Regardless of what a manufacturer or pool builder says about your pool's water volume, here's a trick to make sure you get a good number. Do you have a water meter that measures how much water you use in your house (for billing purposes)? If so, go out and read the meter just before you start filling your pool. Fill to the level you will typically maintain. Refrain as much as possible from using water elsewhere in the house while filling the pool. A few toilet flushes won't matter, even a quick shower. But hold off on watering the yard, or laundry, or long showers, etc. Once the fill is complete, go out and take a second meter reading. The difference between the two meter reads will be the volume of your pool water! Now, meters can be off by 1% or so, and you could try to subtract for toilet flushes, etc, but even then, your end result will be very close, and certainly close enough to calculate your pool's chemical needs...

For what it's worth (and I have a plaster pool), since I took over its care and refilled it, I've added only four things in my pool: chlorine, muriatic acid, salt and cyanuric acid. That's it. Not any other chemicals. Period. My pool water is perfect, and 100% algae free!

You'll have a lot of trouble trying to maintain your water without CYA, so you'll need to solve for that chem's availability issue...
 
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