Fiberglass pool starup

Dreaves

Member
Aug 9, 2019
10
Lake worth fl
Hello All, new to Fiberglass pools here. We bought a house and it's a green pool. We've shocked it 3 times and while it's better it's very cloudy and murky.

So we've come up with that we will probably have to drain the pool and start over fresh, unless you guys say that's not good. I have a party in 7 days, so whatever we do it needs to be done by then.

So I'm here for opinions. Should we drain? If so, what's the chemical startup procedure? If not, what can I use to make this pool swimable again?

I don't have a water test kit, but am going to get one in the morning.

Thanks in advance

Drew
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
11,620
Evans, Georgia
Hello Dreaves, welcome to TroubleFreePools :) Glad to have you here!

Let me get to the first issue- DO NOT DRAIN a fiberglass pool EVER!! (only done rarely by professionals with much preparation). Water is what keeps the fiberglass pool weighted down. Especially in your area with high water tables it would be a disaster to drain.

If you want to exchange water to speed up cleaning, you can do it via a sump pump in one end of the pool, while a hose refills at another end. Depending on water temperatures and pool water temp, the procedure is done one of two ways. I will ask an expert to jump in with directions--> @mknauss

Maddie :flower:
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
11,620
Evans, Georgia
Regarding the test kit-- you won't find the one you need any place local usually. You want one of the Taylor K-2006 (not the 2005 series) because it contains the necessary FAS-DPD tester for chlorine testing up to 50ppm. Its a drip based test, not a color matching test. Don't fall for anything less than the FAS-DPD tester.

You can order a GOOD test kit from www.tftestkits.net and request speed shipping. The TF-100 kit is $70 and has all you need. An extra large version of reagents is also available which might help in your green situation. It is an ideal kit.

Source out your best location to obtain plain liquid chlorine- many pool shops will sell you this in FL I believe? You'll need that, and little else. NO algaecides. NO floc clarifiers. Just liquid chlorine. Walmart sells 10% liquid chlorine in their pool section, but I hear they're changing seasonal items so it may be moving out.... worth a look though.

You need to read a bit--> ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry
You'll need to perform a SLAM process on your water to kill all living algae- SLAM Process




Please ask if you have more questions... we'd love to help you have a grand party next week in your new pool!

Maddie :flower:
 

Dreaves

Member
Aug 9, 2019
10
Lake worth fl
Thanks. Glad I asked. So we will get liquid chroline and the kit is ordered will be here Monday. About how much chroline should I put in? And yes plenty of places sell it i believe. Or is bleach equivalent?
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
11,620
Evans, Georgia
Yes, liquid chlorine is the same as PLAIN household bleach. If you decide to go with bleach understand that its weaker in strength and you'll need more of it to reach your SLAM level. You want to make sure the bleach you buy has no scents, no thickeners, no fancy claims like Chloramax technology...just plain bleach)

You'll either need to use the app PoolMath by TFP, or the classic web version found at the bottom of this page to determine how much of anything you'll add. Until your test kit arrives, add one gallon of liquid chlorine per day and brush the pool. Keep the pump running and monitor your filter for increasing pressure.

Which test kit did you buy?

Can you please make up a signature line (under "Settings") describing your pool size, type, the equipment you have, etc. as this helps us answer knowing what is available.

Have you read PoolSchool articles on the SLAM process yet?

Maddie :flower:
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
22,414
Laughlin, NV
You can exchange some water without draining.

If you place a low volume sub pump in the deep end and pull water from there while adding water in the shallow end (through a skimmer or into a bucket on a step so you lessen the water disturbance) you can do a fairly efficient exchange. That is assuming the water you are filling with is the same temperature or warmer than your pool water. If your fill water is much cooler than your pool water, then switch it. Add the water to the deep end (hose on bottom) and pull water from the top step.

The location of the pump and fill hose may change if you have salt water, high calcium, etc.
In my pool, with saltwater and high calcium when I drain, I put the pump in the deep end and hose in shallow end. The water in the pool weighs more per unit volume than the fill water from the hose.

Be sure to balance the water out and water in so the pool level stays the same. Also be sure your pool pump is disabled during this process. Once started do not stop until you have exchanged the amount of water you wish.
 

Dreaves

Member
Aug 9, 2019
10
Lake worth fl
I had the water tested at a local pool supply.

Total chlorine 0.0
Free chlorine 0.0
Ph 7.4
Alkalinity 120
Calcium hardness 100
Stabilizer 15

I did add 5 gallons of chlorine over the last 2 days.

Water is still murky.

I did clean the filter and ordered a new one.

What else should I be doing?

I added a pic of equipment. I'm guessing about 11k gallons of water.
 

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YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
11,620
Evans, Georgia
More liquid chlorine....brushing daily.. As per post #6 in this thread where I tell you that PoolMath will help guide you in quantities of chemicals, please check it out.

Did I miss if you mentioned you had exchanged any water??

Maddie :flower:
 

LoneWolfArcher

Well-known member
May 29, 2019
262
Michigan
Welcome to the board! I am a fellow Fiberglass pool owner. You've gotten great advice. Just a comment, I came here this spring. Second year of owning the pool. I switched from traditional pool store management practices to Trouble Free Pool practices after arriving here, and am amazed at how easy it is to maintain my pool now! You are in good hands, listen to the experts here and you'll be in great hands.
 

Dreaves

Member
Aug 9, 2019
10
Lake worth fl
great to know LoneWolf!

Maddie, i did a water exchange - it finished up yesterday. probably about 5-6k gallons of water exchanged.

i added one log to poolmath. now it wants to charge me to add more. so i havent added anymore. EDIT : i see the online version now. was using the app.

after the exchange and the SLAM method. here are the results.

TC - 10.0
FC 10.0
pH 7.4
Alkalinity 80
calcium 75
CYA 15


poolmath says to add:
51# stabilizer
4.5oz washing soda - is this the same laundry washing soda?
52 oz baking soda
301 oz calcium


Thanks for all the help. pool is clear now!
 
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ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
10,739
Northern NJ
What are you trying to raise your CYA up to? is 51# ounces or lbs? Either way it looks to be too much.

Why the washing soda and baking soda? Your pH and TA are fine.

A fiberglass pool does not need a lot of calcium. What level does your pool manufacture say is required?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
10,739
Northern NJ
CYA 50 is at the high end of what you should target if you are chlorinating with liquid chlorine. The range should be 30-50. CYA 15 is not a valid measurement. You can barely measure it. And if the dot disappears between 10 and 20 we round up and call it 20. Halfway between lines is not 5 since the scale is logarithmic, not linear.

So if your CYA is really higher then 15 you will overshoot your target of 50 which you don't want to do. Better to assume CYA is 20 and target for 40 and see where you end up. That is 31 ozs of stabilizer.

Any pH in the 7's is ok. TA is ok if your pH is stable. Don't focus on getting your chemicals to a number. Just keep them within a range.
 
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