Failed inspection b/c of pool water bonding

debuda

Well-known member
May 16, 2019
80
Los Angeles
I just failed final inspection because I don't have a water bond.

Inspector informed me about requirements.

Looking online it seems all the conductive material is brass or copper. I understand that copper = bad for pool surfaces.

Is there a stainless alternative for water bonding or is this standard practice?

Thank you in advance!
 

Gladius Nova

Well-known member
Dec 29, 2016
130
Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
Is this an owner-build or a pool company build? Here is the National Electrical Code:
Bonding The Pool
a. All metal parts must be bonded together using a #8 (or larger) solid copper wire.
b. Conductive pool shells must be boned in a minimum of four (equal) points uniformly spaced around
the pool.
c. Non-conductive pool shells must have a #8 (or larger) solid copper wire buried 4” - 6” below finished
grade with such bond wire placed from18” – 24” from the inside pool wall around the pool,
(equipotential bonding) that which starts and returns/ terminates at the pool pump.
d. Bonding points or attachment must use non-corrosive clamps.
e. A minimum of nine (9) square inches of metal must in the water to bond the water.
 
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ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,754
Northern NJ
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Neto

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2019
177
Urbana, MD
If this is a gunite pool, while your pool was being built, the rebar should have been bonded on all 4 sides, this is basically copper ground cables attached to the rebar on several places in that area. Also, if you have a concrete deck that had rebar, these ground cables needed to be attached too. The water of the pool should have been grounded too, usually they do this with a pool water bonding kit like this. My pool builder connected all these wires to two huge rods that are installed on the actual ground and there is a PVC piece that also has connection to water & ground. I am not sure what are the requirements for the fiberglass or vinyl pools but I am sure its less complicated that gunite.
 

debuda

Well-known member
May 16, 2019
80
Los Angeles
Thanks for all the replies. I realize I should have been more descriptive in my question.

The pool is gunite and has the required equipotential bonding from shell to deck to pool equipment. It is an owner builder.
The pool lights are led and dont have the metal plate behind that is in contact with water...which is why I need to have a "water bonding" (or at least that's what I understood).

The inspector recommended something like @Neto mentioned with the water bonding kit to tie into the plumbing near the equipment and then use an 8# wire to connect to existing bonding.

My question is whether this will cause trouble with copper in the pool.
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
529
MA
My question is whether this will cause trouble with copper in the pool
Great question... :epds:

I guess the same question could be asked about pool heaters though. not really sure what they use for heat exchanger but I believe it's copper isn't it?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,754
Northern NJ
Copper in plumbing is not a problem unless the pH gets too low and the copper dissolves into the pool water.

Maintain correct pH of 7.0 and above. Beware of acid startups or other processes that lower pH below 7.
 

debuda

Well-known member
May 16, 2019
80
Los Angeles
Great question... :epds:

I guess the same question could be asked about pool heaters though. not really sure what they use for heat exchanger but I believe it's copper isn't it?
Good point!!

Copper in plumbing is not a problem unless the pH gets too low and the copper dissolves into the pool water.

Maintain correct pH of 7.0 and above. Beware of acid startups or other processes that lower pH below 7.
Thanks!
 
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