Easiest way to plumb outdoor kitchen

kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#1
I am planning an outdoor kitchen and am looking at running cold water only from the house. It will be about 30 -40 feet from the house. I think I will be digging a hole and burying a 10 gallon bucket filled with gravel for the gray water.

My only question is what is the easiest way to get water out there?

I have a garden hose faucet in the back, can I cut that line under the house, install a Tee and hook that back up and split off to the outdoor sink?

If I can do I just drill through out brick go out with the pipe then straight down into the ground t the sink?

Can I use standard 3/4 rigid PVC to run the line or does it need to be flex hose? Not planning on drinking the water, just washing out glasses,hands, maybe vet garages before putting on grill , exe.


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kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#2
Also should I run the plumbing up through concrete or just stub it up In the back of the planned bar area right next to the concrete pad. This is a new build btw.


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Mar 14, 2012
11
0
#3
You should be able to do just as you said and tap into the faucet line with a T and pull the feed off of that but you might want to put a shut off at the house end for freeze protection, etc. I am planning a cold water sink/shower out by my pool so I ran 1/2" pvc from the house to the edge of the equipment pad in the trench my electrician used for the panel. Mine is currently capped on both ends but I plan to tap into the house line and put a shut off on the line just after the T so I can shut off that line in the winter to protect from freezing (we tend to get cold weather here in Maryland). As for running it up through concrete, doing that is not necessary but will make the install more permanent (be that good or bad).
 

kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#4
msudawg said:
You should be able to do just as you said and tap into the faucet line with a T and pull the feed off of that but you might want to put a shut off at the house end for freeze protection, etc. I am planning a cold water sink/shower out by my pool so I ran 1/2" pvc from the house to the edge of the equipment pad in the trench my electrician used for the panel. Mine is currently capped on both ends but I plan to tap into the house line and put a shut off on the line just after the T so I can shut off that line in the winter to protect from freezing (we tend to get cold weather here in Maryland). As for running it up through concrete, doing that is not necessary but will make the install more permanent (be that good or bad).
Thanks for the reply! I live in Alabama and although we do not have harsh winters we do have freezing temps at times so I will defiantly put a shutoff after the tee under the house.

Did you use rigid PVC or flex?

Did you just drill through the foundation and go straight downinto the ground?



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Mar 14, 2012
11
0
#5
I used rigid pvc and where it enters the house I came up above grade and came through the foundation wall with a hammer drill.
 

Stevereno

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2010
184
0
New Caney, TX 77357
#6
Maybe I am missing something but is there a reason you want to go through the slab rather than installing the tee outside (ahead of the existing faucet valve)? This is what we did to get water to our kitchen.
 

kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#7
Stevereno said:
Maybe I am missing something but is there a reason you want to go through the slab rather than installing the tee outside (ahead of the existing faucet valve)? This is what we did to get water to our kitchen.
Do you mean installing a Tee in between the house and faucet so the garden hose faucet sticks out from the house?


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Stevereno

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2010
184
0
New Caney, TX 77357
#8
kyle11 said:
Stevereno said:
Maybe I am missing something but is there a reason you want to go through the slab rather than installing the tee outside (ahead of the existing faucet valve)? This is what we did to get water to our kitchen.
Do you mean installing a Tee in between the house and faucet so the garden hose faucet sticks out from the house?


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Yes, that's what I am saying. If you do that you can run the new line straight down into your trench without making any slab/brick penetrations. I understand that may not be the most aesthetic way to do it but you were asking about the "easiest" way. :cool:
 

XsAllOverIt

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2010
560
0
Mount Airy, Maryland
#9
I'll give you an example of what I did and how I hooked it up. I teed off of PVC in my downstairs bedroom with 3/4" rigid PVC that ran out to an outside faucet. I ran the T'd section to the location where both my electric and gas went to my new pool. Ran rigid 3/4" PVC through that 3' ditch out to the pool house. Prior to leaving the house, I've got a valve attached (bicycle valve) that is used for winterizing each year. I also have another valve closer to the pool house. Once in the pool house, I've got a water heater and run water to a shower, 2 sinks, icemaker, underground frost free faucet, a simple outdoor faucet and an autofill to my pond. We drink the water full-time and drain the shower/sinks into a buried 55 gallon trashcan filled with clean gravel. Works great and went through one winter of winterization with no issues. Most of my lines are buried at about 1-3 feet below grade, so there is a risk of freeze here in MD, but blowing out the lines each winter will minimize all the risks of frozen pipes. I sure don't want to re-run any of these lines. I've got bluestone over all those areas. I also took some detailed photos of all my runs and installations for future reference. They will help immensely in the future if I run into problems.
 

kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#10
Stevereno said:
kyle11 said:
Stevereno said:
Maybe I am missing something but is there a reason you want to go through the slab rather than installing the tee outside (ahead of the existing faucet valve)? This is what we did to get water to our kitchen.
Do you mean installing a Tee in between the house and faucet so the garden hose faucet sticks out from the house?


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Yes, that's what I am saying. If you do that you can run the new line straight down into your trench without making any slab/brick penetrations. I understand that may not be the most aesthetic way to do it but you were asking about the "easiest" way. :cool:

Ok thanks Steve, that's what I thought you was referring to. That would defiantly be the easiest way but I don't know of I could swing that by the wife as the faucet I would have to hook up to is very visible from out back porch/ pool area. That is defiantly an option though.


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kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#11
XsAllOverIt said:
I'll give you an example of what I did and how I hooked it up. I teed off of PVC in my downstairs bedroom with 3/4" rigid PVC that ran out to an outside faucet. I ran the T'd section to the location where both my electric and gas went to my new pool. Ran rigid 3/4" PVC through that 3' ditch out to the pool house. Prior to leaving the house, I've got a valve attached (bicycle valve) that is used for winterizing each year. I also have another valve closer to the pool house. Once in the pool house, I've got a water heater and run water to a shower, 2 sinks, icemaker, underground frost free faucet, a simple outdoor faucet and an autofill to my pond. We drink the water full-time and drain the shower/sinks into a buried 55 gallon trashcan filled with clean gravel. Works great and went through one winter of winterization with no issues. Most of my lines are buried at about 1-3 feet below grade, so there is a risk of freeze here in MD, but blowing out the lines each winter will minimize all the risks of frozen pipes. I sure don't want to re-run any of these lines. I've got bluestone over all those areas. I also took some detailed photos of all my runs and installations for future reference. They will help immensely in the future if I run into problems.
Thanks that helps.

Did you stub it up through concrete or just run it to the back of the building and in through a wall?

Also can standard PVC be used or does it need to be sch40? I would imagine sch40 is not needed but do not know for sure.





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Stevereno

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2010
184
0
New Caney, TX 77357
#12
kyle11 said:
Ok thanks Steve, that's what I thought you was referring to. That would defiantly be the easiest way but I don't know of I could swing that by the wife as the faucet I would have to hook up to is very visible from out back porch/ pool area. That is defiantly an option though.


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Yeah, that's always an issue. :cool:

I will try to post a picture tonight. Not having much success from work PC.
 

XsAllOverIt

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2010
560
0
Mount Airy, Maryland
#13
kyle11 said:
Thanks that helps.

Did you stub it up through concrete or just run it to the back of the building and in through a wall?

Also can standard PVC be used or does it need to be sch40? I would imagine sch40 is not needed but do not know for sure.

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Mine was all run prior to any work. I've got a lot of pictures of my entire build.
http://www.golfmd.com/baurphotoalbum/po ... seII-4.htm

At the bottom of this page, I run from the house to the pool house. My pool house wasn't really complete so all the plumbing came up from the ground into the pool house which is on concrete pillars as you can see.
 

kyle11

Well-known member
May 17, 2012
470
0
#14
Thats a very impressive build! We are still trying to decide on what we want really. I kind of want to take elements from a pergola/gazebo and also elements from something like you built. I like walls that a pool house provides but I want a completely open front with no doors, maybe a bar extending half of the width. I just can't decide, luckily we still have a little while before we have to.


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mikeginder

Well-known member
May 23, 2011
133
0
#15
i would use 1/2 pex pipe... much better in case of a freeze situation, you need a tool but you can rent one for the day
 

Lonstar

New member
Jul 15, 2012
1
0
#16
mikeginder said:
i would use 1/2 pex pipe... much better in case of a freeze situation, you need a tool but you can rent one for the day

I 100% agree, Pex is the way to go. It's very easy to run because of its flexibility over PVC, and it's tough, not thin walled like the old poly piping. Most new house builds use Pex instead of copper, and I've replaced some of the copper in my house with Pex when needed. I know how to sweat copper, and I have no problem doing it when necessary, but if I can replace copper with Pex, I do.

You'll need two tools; a good quality hose cutter (>$10), and a good quality Pex cinch clamp tool to clamp the stainless steel cinch clamps ($50). I have a Kobalt brand cutter and a Kobalt crimper that I bought at Lowes, and they've worked fine for me over the years.
 

mikeginder

Well-known member
May 23, 2011
133
0
#17
Lonstar said:
mikeginder said:
i would use 1/2 pex pipe... much better in case of a freeze situation, you need a tool but you can rent one for the day

I 100% agree, Pex is the way to go. It's very easy to run because of its flexibility over PVC, and it's tough, not thin walled like the old poly piping. Most new house builds use Pex instead of copper, and I've replaced some of the copper in my house with Pex when needed. I know how to sweat copper, and I have no problem doing it when necessary, but if I can replace copper with Pex, I do.

You'll need two tools; a good quality hose cutter (>$10), and a good quality Pex cinch clamp tool to clamp the stainless steel cinch clamps ($50). I have a Kobalt brand cutter and a Kobalt crimper that I bought at Lowes, and they've worked fine for me over the years.
i have the kobalt stuff and can sweat pipe as well and i also use pex when i can... and if out in the open i use the heck out of shark bites as well..
 

twmackey

Well-known member
Jun 25, 2012
53
0
#18
I know this really late, but I had mine pumbed right from the indoor kitchen sink through the wall and and tied into my out door sink and cabinet. Using the same drain as is inside. My cabinet is a little taller and is on wheels it makes it much easier to move if I need to for any reason.
 

vinper

Well-known member
Jun 20, 2013
190
0
Huffman Tx
#19
I came off the exterior hose bib ,with a tee/valve then a 12-14'' Galvenized pipe into the ground . its nice to be able to weed whack & mow around metal. pipe then run underground with whatever ..