Driving me CRAZY!

JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
Look at the pics below regarding our HOA pool. These are FB screen shots over the past 3 days and it is KILLING me to keep my mouth shut.
The pool is maintained by a local pool store. This is the second time this summer the pool has been closed for a partial drain due to too much CYA.
First of all the only way CYA/ stabilizer can be too high is if too much has been put in. (I'm thinking they must use pucks)
It appears the CYA has gotten so high that the chlorine demand is out of sight and they had an algae bloom.

Yet, someone has decided swim suits and/or floats containing algae from ocean or lakes is the culprit o_O
I can only imagine how much this pool store is charging the HOA to straighten out a problem that the pool store created.

As a side note: My grandchildren have worn swimsuits and brought floats in that have been in the lake and the ocean. I have never had an algae outbreak from it.
Do I dare interfere?

I didn't know whether to choose full size or thumbnails for the photos. Hope you can enlarge to read!

Joan
IMG_8545.jpgIMG_8544.jpgIMG_8542.jpg
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,598
Basic incompetence.

They seem to be implying that the cyanuric acid problem is coming from people's suits or toys that have been in lakes etc.

Contact the person who's responsible for managing the pool service and give them a link to troublefreepool.com.

Tell them to buy a test kit and make sure that the levels are correct based on the correct chemistry knowledge.
 
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PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,837
Damascus, MD
There are different rules for commercial pools. I doubt they are going to change anything due to a member's input these organizations are pretty set in their ways. I would never swim in that pool btw.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,598
The person who's responsible for the management of the property has a duty to do it correctly.

They are obviously not doing it correctly, but they don't know how to do it correctly.

They are trusting someone who should know what to do.

They need to be informed so that they can take action and correct the situation.

This situation is creating not only inconvenience and loss of money, but it's a health and safety issue as well.

The performance of the so called professionals is not acceptable and it should not be ignored.

If people are willing to accept lame, bs excuses for why their pool keeps going green, they will keep getting the same results.

Only when they demand good service, will they consistently get it.
 
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JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
There are different rules for commercial pools. I doubt they are going to change anything due to a member's input these organizations are pretty set in their ways. I would never swim in that pool btw.
I agree that there are different rules. I can't think that high CYA with inadequate chlorine levels is okay however. I also doubt they would change anything due to my input because I don't work at a pool store.
As an FYI- we have a pool store here called The Pool Store. They are NOT the ones managing this pool. I wouldn't swim in it or let anyone I know swim in it. Who knows what's in it and what all of the levels are?
 

Oly

Gold Supporter
Jun 28, 2017
1,180
Fresno, CA
This is a tough situation, I sympathize with you. Research your local public pool guidelines. Here we have allowable levels of CYA with a maximum of 100ppm for public pools.
Getting anything done by a group or committee is cumbersome and requires much persistence.
That said you have two issues to confront in order to correct this problem, education and responsibility.
Trying to educate people is difficult and trying to educate a group of people is more difficult.
Someone or some committee is responsible for this pool system and convincing them to disregard the "pool professional" method is expecting them to take a huge risk.
If this was my only available pool I would try my best to educate the people involved but realize the potential downside, that you become the problem in their eyes. :brickwall:
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,598
They care about the opinion of the members. Get the information to the members directly and then the manager will take it seriously.
 
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JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
One thing you could/should do is get a water sample, take a full testing battery, and notify your local health department if warranted.
You know, I did think about getting a sample and testing it. If it has high chlorine right now like the sign says then "they" are trying to SLAM it appears. I just wonder what the CYA is and if they're SLAMming at the correct level. A balanced and adequately chlorinated pool would not have gotten a bloom. I've had algae and it was because I let my Cl level get too low and/or did not brush my pool well. Pools have to be maintained.
It's irritating to me that the pool company (rather than say store) either hasn't told the association how to care for the pool or IF the pool company is being paid to come out and do it, then it wasn't done.
I don't know what to do. We don't use that pool because we have a pool but others do including children.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,598
Ask the pool company for the records of the chemistry. They're required to keep records and make them available on request according to most health departments.

Ask when the last health inspection was done.

Talk to the manager and tell them that the current situation is unacceptable and advise them what they can do to fix the problem.

The manager is probably just as frustrated with the situation as everyone else. They just don't know what else to do. Help them resolve the problem to everyone's satisfaction.
 

JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
Ask the pool company for the records of the chemistry. They're required to keep records and make them available on request according to most health departments.

Ask when the last health inspection was done.

Talk to the manager and tell them that the current situation is unacceptable and advise them what they can do to fix the problem.

The manager is probably just as frustrated with the situation as everyone else. They just don't know what else to do. Help them resolve the problem to everyone's satisfaction.
The health Dept did do an inspection early in June I believe. Thank you for giving me needed information to bring to the manager’s attention - IF I GET UP THE NERVE.
This is the latest post from the manager to members. There’s more overload of CYA here than there is in the pool!!
C413C566-4938-49E7-8EC8-DFF402010B51.jpeg
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,598
Is Gary a certified pool operator (CPO)?

I think that someone needs to tell the manager that the main issue is that Gary doesn't know what he's doing.

Maybe call Gary and talk about what the problem is and what can be done.

Maybe have him meet you at the pool for a talk about the maintenance and what needs to be done going forward.
 
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JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
@JamesW I would love to do what you suggested but unfortunately I can’t circumvent the one in our neighborhood who manages the pool.
I have great respect for this person and hope to speak with them about it when they get back in town.
Wish me luck!
 

frogabog

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2010
2,833
Portland, Oregon
You could show them some of the TFP videos. They are short and sweet, and get straight to the point. Wouldn't take very long of a sit down to get some facts across.

I don't know much about HOAs, but doesn't a committee of sorts meet regularly that anyone in the HOA can attend? A little presentation to everyone on the HOA board might be helpful.
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,598
Ok, I'm sure that she's as frustrated as everyone. She's relying on Gary, who doesn't know what he's doing. You just need to inform her about what's really happening.
 
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zea3

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2009
11,725
Houston, Texas
Quick points to relay to the pool manager who talks to Gary:
1. CYA/Stabilizer is only introduced into pools by pool chemicals such as the self-titled CYA/Stabilizer/Conditioner, granulated dichlor/trichlor, or pucks containing dichlor/trichlor. CYA doesn't grow in the wild. It is not present in lakes, rivers, or oceans. It does not meld with pool surfaces to be released into the water unexpectedly. We have some good videos and articles on TFP that explain the CYA chlorine ratio, but if she is reluctant to take our word for it, google CYA/Chlorine relationship. There are several other sources that explain it, including one pool tech blog.
2. If the HOA is going to continue to use a pool tech such as Gary, then they need to be prepared to check the CYA levels and do a partial drain and refill before CYA gets out of hand, or supplement FC with liquid chlorine between Gary's visits to keep algae away.
3. They may want to consider adding an SWG or other automated chlorine system to the pool, and use Gary to vacuum and maintain equipment.
 
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JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
Quick points to relay to the pool manager who talks to Gary:
1. CYA/Stabilizer is only introduced into pools by pool chemicals such as the self-titled CYA/Stabilizer/Conditioner, granulated dichlor/trichlor, or pucks containing dichlor/trichlor. CYA doesn't grow in the wild. It is not present in lakes, rivers, or oceans. It does not meld with pool surfaces to be released into the water unexpectedly. We have some good videos and articles on TFP that explain the CYA chlorine ratio, but if she is reluctant to take our word for it, google CYA/Chlorine relationship. There are several other sources that explain it, including one pool tech blog.
2. If the HOA is going to continue to use a pool tech such as Gary, then they need to be prepared to check the CYA levels and do a partial drain and refill before CYA gets out of hand, or supplement FC with liquid chlorine between Gary's visits to keep algae away.
3. They may want to consider adding an SWG or other automated chlorine system to the pool, and use Gary to vacuum and maintain equipment.
This sounds like something reasonable to present to the manager. Hopefully she won't think I'm interfering with her job/position. I plan to talk with her when she gets back to town.

I found an older post about swimsuits worn in lake introducing algae into pools. It was clear that proper chlorine levels would take care of any green or black algae but mustard brought in could cause a problem.
It also says to launder swimsuits with detergent after lake or ocean before going into pool. That seems like common sense to me.
How will "lake water" swimsuits affect my chlorine pool?

I knew my TFP group would love to hear about this.
 

Oly

Gold Supporter
Jun 28, 2017
1,180
Fresno, CA
Best to agree with everyone about the swimsuit and pool toy concern.
Do find out the CYA level if chem logs were kept.
All you can do is try to reason with them about the FC/CYA Chart.
Good luck. Send them all the vid
 
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JoanC

Silver Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 26, 2012
180
Rome, GA
Best to agree with everyone about the swimsuit and pool toy concern.
Do find out the CYA level if chem logs were kept.
All you can do is try to reason with them about the FC/CYA Chart.
Good luck. Send them all the vid
I hope to get a sample. I couldn’t get in today. Getting the logs will be up to the manager. I don’t have authority to ask for them. I sure would like to see them IF there are any.
Thank you for finding and posting the video! Great to give to them.
Thank you again!
 
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