Drained and cleaned pool...

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
With the help of a pool company (which are great folks) I'm in the process of refilling it.

They guessimated the pool is 30,000 gallons.

My question is it ok to leave the hose on for about 48 hours when I'm on well water? This is the first house I owned with well water so I was curious to know if I could burn out the pump from leaving it on constantly.
 

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YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
16,027
Evans, Georgia
Kinda depends on your well and pump. Others here have said they couldn't but I don't recall if anyone ever announced that they did.

Some folkd truck water in to avoid putting too much strain on the well.

Maddie
 
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svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
Also, do you have iron or other metals in your water you need to worry about?
How the water tested and nothing dangerous in the water I certainly do have iron in the water but nothing in high concentration I don't recall the numbers off hand but had a special company combined to a lab test before we bought the house.
 

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
Kinda depends on your well and pump. Others here have said they couldn't but I don't recall if anyone ever announced that they did.

Some folkd truck water in to avoid putting too much strain on the well.

Maddie
Shoot didn't think of trucking in water! Oh well the pool is filled up halfway as of now. Will keep that in mind for future reference!
 

crusemm

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Sep 1, 2011
401
North Texas
OK, my concern is that when chlorine is added to water with iron (not sure of the required concentration) it causes the iron to oxidize, which can create nasty yellow/brown water and cause staining. This also consumes some of the chlorine you are counting on to sanitize your pool. The usual solution is polyfill in the fill line or skimmer to absorb the oxidized iron out of the water.
 
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svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
OK, my concern is that when chlorine is added to water with iron (not sure of the required concentration) it causes the iron to oxidize, which can create nasty yellow/brown water and cause staining. This also consumes some of the chlorine you are counting on to sanitize your pool. The usual solution is polyfill in the fill line or skimmer to absorb the oxidized iron out of the water.
The pool company put something in the water...looks like a bottle water( taped to the hose) to help with the iron. Just can't read the name or recall what they said about it. Hopefully that will help?
 

crusemm

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Bronze Supporter
Sep 1, 2011
401
North Texas
I don't know about iron, typically they tape an empty water bottle to the end of the hose so that the hose floats up as you are filling the pool, so it doesn't channel new plaster.
 
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crusemm

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Sep 1, 2011
401
North Texas
What type of pool and filter do you have? Please fill out your signature so we can better help you. Looks like a Plaster pool. They may have added a sequestrant to bind the iron, and if they have experience with the water in the area, that may be what they did. General rule here is, never add anything to the water if you don't know what it does.
 
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svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
Here's the bottle... I'm not even sure what type of pool filter I have or where to even find it to be honest with you this is the main reason I'm having a pool company out here to educate me which they plan on stopping by tomorrow once the water is higher and then we are going to test the equipment. I'll be sure to ask him for all the information and will update my signature. Thanks for reminding me. I also bought the TF100 kit suggested on here so I have that ready to go.
 

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crusemm

Gold Supporter
Bronze Supporter
Sep 1, 2011
401
North Texas
It looks like that is a stain remover mixed with a sequestrant. Do some research on this site for solutions to iron in fill water. If you are topping up from a well that has iron dissolved in the water, you will have to have some sort of ongoing method to deal with the iron. This is usually some sort of poly fill method to filter the iron oxide or a continuing treatment with a sequestrant. if you have any questions, feel free to ask, somebody here will have an answer.
 
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svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
It looks like that is a stain remover mixed with a sequestrant. Do some research on this site for solutions to iron in fill water. If you are topping up from a well that has iron dissolved in the water, you will have to have some sort of ongoing method to deal with the iron. This is usually some sort of poly fill method to filter the iron oxide or a continuing treatment with a sequestrant. if you have any questions, feel free to ask, somebody here will have an answer.

thanks for this information so quick question I've been running the spigot for over 24 hours and today I noticed some water drops in the basement then I looked up at the ceiling and the copper pipe which is running to the outdoor spigot to fill the pool is completely filled with condensation and is dripping in numerous places.

it's a very humid day here in the Chicagoland area and it's hot so I suppose there's no way around this right?
 

Frodo

Active member
Jul 5, 2014
25
Central New Jersey
thanks for this information so quick question I've been running the spigot for over 24 hours and today I noticed some water drops in the basement then I looked up at the ceiling and the copper pipe which is running to the outdoor spigot to fill the pool is completely filled with condensation and is dripping in numerous places.

it's a very humid day here in the Chicagoland area and it's hot so I suppose there's no way around this right?
That's normal. You have cold groundwater (well) plus humid air which equals condensation on the pipes. Same as you would would get on the outside of a glass of ice water.
 
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svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
That's normal. You have cold groundwater (well) plus humid air which equals condensation on the pipes. Same as you would would get on the outside of a glass of ice water.
Whew that was relief...The only downside is the spigot pipe that was dripping in the house is all drywalled in the ceiling.

I'm sure I'll find some mold in there from the previous owner. luckily I figured out there was another spigot on the side of the house which also goes through some drywall but as much. It was for a sprinkler system.

Hopefully tomorrow will be able to turn on the pool system and see how things fare from there
 

svtcobra

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2019
113
Chicago, IL
May I suggest some pipe insulation, found at any hardware store. It keeps the warm, moist air off of the cold pipes and prevents the condensation, thus preventing the dripping.
Yes I plan on cutting the drywall...adding this insulation and using the other spigot for the pool. Thanks.
 
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