Does chloride in tap water have impact on hot tub water testing (chem geek?)

watson524

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2014
169
Lake Ariel, PA
Random question... I was looking at a test report from our water sample from back in 2004 that was taken just to see how our well water was.

For chloride, the max level per EPA Method 325.3 is 5.0 mg/l. Our water came back with a result of 11 (my parents right up the road on another well were non detectable for chloride, but we all know how wells right near each other can differ)

If I remember, chloride is chlorine and salt right? We're no where near an option but I suppose I could buy that run off from road salt gets into our water because we're on the low side of the road (vs my parents being on the high side of the road) Does us having "high" levels have any impact on our hot tub water and testing we do?

My guess is no but I thought it was interesting when I looked through the results and figured I'd ask. Maybe I could have a salt water tub without a SWG?? LOL!
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
No, chloride and chlorine are the same element, but their oxidation state is different so you can consider them to be different chemicals. Chloride is the same as found in sodium chloride which is ordinary table salt. It is essentially innocuous unless it gets to very high levels at which point it can make the water more corrosive to metal. When chlorine gets used/consumed it (most of the time) converts to chloride.

Your salt level is not high but low -- very low. The EPA chloride drinking water limit is 250 ppm and it's only a "soft" limit since it only relates to a salty taste in the water. I don't know where you are getting that the "max level" is 5.0 mg/L. To have a saltwater chlorine generator for your spa you'd need to get the chloride level (measured as sodium chloride) up to around 2000 ppm (mg/L) so much, much higher than you have now.
 

watson524

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2014
169
Lake Ariel, PA
Maybe I misread something in the report. It says "reporting limit 5.0 mg/l" and the result is 11. In rethinking this, maybe they meant the reporting limit as 5.0 is the most they can detect, but then 11 as a result doesn't fit.

I did see the 250 limit when I did a quick search so I wasn't too worried about my water, and it's not like it tastes salty or anything :)
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
28,201
The reporting limit is the smallest concentration that can be reported by the testing facility.

Levels below 5 would probably be listed as not detected or below reporting limit.
 
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