Does algae form a protective barrier?

Exlonghorn

Gold Supporter
Jun 16, 2019
84
Houston
Is this true?
“When you start off with not enough chlorine the algae forms a protective membrane that makes it harder to kill. It is better to use an algaecide versus the crapshoot on superchlorinating the water exclusively”
 

IceShadow

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 8, 2019
2,177
Milwaukee, WI
Cholrine will kill the outer layer of algae has built up on a surface and make it harder for chlorine to reach the living algae beneath.

That would make algaecide harder to reach it too, and the algaecide will be adding chems that cause other problems.

The answer? Brush the pool. This gets the dead layer off and lets the chlorine get to the living algae.
 

Donldson

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 12, 2009
4,432
NW Ohio
Does algae form a protective barrier? Yes.

Does that mean it is better to use algaecide? Not even a little bit.

It's weird, in this industry these things always start out with something true and reasonable, before steering right in to some mind-boggling idea or advice. My question to whomever wrote that is: If the barrier protects the algae from chlorine, what makes them think it won't also protect it from algaecide? And algaecide isn't very good at killing algae anyway, it's a preventative.

Anyway, before this turns in to a real rant, I will go back to it. Yes, algae forms protective membranes and that is why brushing is an important part of the SLAM Process. Free-floating algae does not have these membranes and brushing algae off the side disrupts the membranes allowing the chlorine to take care of things.
 
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Exlonghorn

Gold Supporter
Jun 16, 2019
84
Houston
Does algae form a protective barrier? Yes.

Does that mean it is better to use algaecide? Not even a little bit.

It's weird, in this industry these things always start out with something true and reasonable, before steering right in to some mind-boggling idea or advice. My question to whomever wrote that is: If the barrier protects the algae from chlorine, what makes them think it won't also protect it from algaecide? And algaecide isn't very good at killing algae anyway, it's a preventative.

Anyway, before this turns in to a real rant, I will go back to it. Yes, algae forms protective membranes and that is why brushing is an important part of the SLAM Process. Free-floating algae does not have these membranes and brushing algae off the side disrupts the membranes allowing the chlorine to take care of things.
Interesting. Thanks for sharing. The membrane deal was new info to me.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
19,464
Brushing is also one of the best ways to detect algae.

The water might seem clean and clear, but the start of algae will usually be obvious when you brush the walls and floor due to the colored cloud produced when algae is brushed loose.
 
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