Do I have recourse against pool builder

duckcmmndr

Bronze Supporter
May 7, 2014
232
Arkansas
Pool Size
29980
Surface
Vinyl
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Hayward Aqua Rite (T-15)
Man...that is a problem that I would not want to have. I personally would get a landscape expert, or two, out there to look at it.

From the pictures it looks like the majority of your back yard slopes towards the pool (not good). I don't know with that slope if french drains alone would catch all the runoff during a heavy rain. I can see some of the runoff going over the top of the drain (especially if covered with grass) and into the pool. I think the best bet would be to install a low retaining wall all the way around the back side of the pool with a french drain along the wall. Either way...you are probably going to, temporarily, mess up a very nice yard to fix it.
 

Candurin

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2017
269
South Jersey
Pool Size
13000
Surface
Fiberglass
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
We had to put a recharge trench (French drain with 8” perf pipe) around our entire pool. This was actually required in the plans approved by the township and not something our PB even discussed with us (the property topo surveyer put it in there). PB bluntly told us that was our responsibility. No big deal, we dug the trench and buried everything once PB was done. Our pool was installed 1’ higher than our house finished floor grade; but the drain is really to prevent runoff back towards our foundation or the neighbors yard.

You’d never know we had it under our new lawn.
 

bmoreswim

Mod Squad
Gold Supporter
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2012
6,879
Central MD
Pool Size
27000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Hayward Aqua Rite (T-15)
Man...that is a problem that I would not want to have. I personally would get a landscape expert, or two, out there to look at it.

From the pictures it looks like the majority of your back yard slopes towards the pool (not good). I don't know with that slope if french drains alone would catch all the runoff during a heavy rain. I can see some of the runoff going over the top of the drain (especially if covered with grass) and into the pool. I think the best bet would be to install a low retaining wall all the way around the back side of the pool with a french drain along the wall. Either way...you are probably going to, temporarily, mess up a very nice yard to fix it.
I agree that this is where my head's at on this one. French drains are less likely to handle a deluge unless they also have sizable open/exposed grates to accept a massive inflow. The brute force method of berms and/or retaining walls are what I'd lean towards. And specifically, since you don't have a lot of real estate to work with back there, I'd lean towards retaining walls versus berms (though perhaps some of the latter may come into play).

As to your post question of recourse, I'm on James' side that although the PB should have built it higher (solving all problems), that's not typically stated as being their obligation to get the drainage correct. Thought it clearly should be implied, it really isn't. So recourse? Probably not, or at least not easily or worthwhile. Though the fix may end up being quite spendy.
 

Alc210

Member
Oct 28, 2018
14
Lansdale
Was the landscaping added after the pool was built, or was the arborvitae already there? Is the yard on the other side of the arborvitae also at a higher elevation?
Arborvitae were already there and yes the yard on the other side is higher elevations
 

shanebo

Well-known member
May 25, 2017
120
Southern NJ
Ugh, that sucks. Can tell from the pics that your pool should have been built 1-2 ft higher ... As for remedy, I don't see how "grading" could help, as the back of your yard is clearly higher than your pool. And I agree that a storm drain alone is probably not enough -- I'd look at a retaining wall or berm in addition to the drain. Do you have a spot where the water can exit the drain? As for recourse, that depends on your contract. If PB was solely responsible for elevation, then I could see you getting something from him, but you'll probably have to pay an attorney by the hour, hire an expert, etc. Could be more costly than the fix. I've done a couple of similar cases where the pool companies have settled early, though, so it might be worth a shot.
 

march2012

LifeTime Supporter
Jan 21, 2012
468
TX
I dont really see how a pool builder would know the flow of water coming in from a neighbors yard, that isnt really their expertise. I think the solution is relatively inexpensive no matter which way you go.

It depends on your contract, but unless it was explicitly called out I would just take care of it myself.
 
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