DIY Vinyl IGP - Yes or No? Why?

Hojo76

Silver Supporter
Jun 20, 2016
48
Central Arkansas
We are in the middle of a poolwarehouse diy build now. We are anywhere close to finished, but we have saved at least 10K already on excavation and eguipment alone. It will be closer to 20-25K by the time we get everything done. Also in Arkansas. It has been a huge headache, but definitely worth it to us!
 
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jimmythegreek

Bronze Supporter
TFP Guide
Aug 10, 2017
1,171
Morris Cnty NJ
It's a huge process and takes all your free time/weekends for a long time. If you have construction knowledge its do able and you can save some bucks. Depending on the scope of the yard it can be major or minor. Poster above says they are saving 10k which if you figure their time in hours it's a wash almost. But ita money saved. In my case pool was easy the landscaping and retaining walls plus water issues were the killer. I'm around 20k and would have been 60k to pay outright for the scope of my work. So it varies alot and at the building panels stage you need help and need alot of time to get panels in and pour collar. And all this depends on weather
 
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Nectarologist

Well-known member
Apr 3, 2015
528
New York
If going diy is the difference between pool or no pool then try it. But if you can afford to have it built do it. its a lot of hard work that can be done 4x faster by a company. do stuff that's not a must by yourself like landscaping. get the pool in right, with a warranty, then enjoy it as you complete other projects. the goal is to be swimming, so get that done asap.
 
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Pool_Medic

In The Industry
Apr 1, 2018
964
Bangor Maine
If you are a skilled DIY it’s not a difficult process. Site prep is the big keg, a skilled excavator operator can basically do the bulk of the work. The biggest issue for most is forming the hopper and then the vermiculite.
 
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If you are a skilled DIY it’s not a difficult process. Site prep is the big keg, a skilled excavator operator can basically do the bulk of the work. The biggest issue for most is forming the hopper and then the vermiculite.
My only concern is dealing with groundwater. Were sitting on all grey clay, not sure how deep but I know it's down to six feet at least because thats how deep my perk test pits were when we built.
 

SBall

Well-known member
Jun 27, 2017
243
Nashville, TN
Your yard is begging for a pool. I am in the same boat as jimmythegreek...total for me was a little under $25k. The guy that did the concrete work and the vermiculite floor told me if he bid the job it would have been $50k minimum. So yeah, big savings for us.

The worst thing about DIY is that there is no fast way to get it done. I was up at 5am for three months last summer working on the pool before I headed off to work. Weekends, evenings...it just takes a long time. For me, we were able to save enough that I could afford to do a few nicer things on the pool that I wanted, which did contribute in part to things taking so long.
 

jeflogan

Gold Supporter
May 23, 2012
94
Urbandale/IA
We are on the final stages of a DIY build from Pool Warehouse and I saved 30k on the pool alone. Our total budget is 50K for the pool and all landscaping with bids from 60-70K for just the pool where I live. I have been pleased with Pool Warehouse and their support. I hired out the digging 3000.00, poolcrete 4500 and hired general labors at $16 per hour to help with the pool walls as I did not want to rely on friends and family. I would hire help as it did speed up the process and one of the guys happened to be really good making sure everything was level. We started digging April 3rd and should have been finished by Memorial Day but the poolcrete guys kept getting rained out. I would do it again in a heartbeat.
My build
 
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For perspective the house is 98' end to end, and 48' wide. We have a lot of room to work with in the rear of the house Pool size is what were trying to decide, we have a decent size family... four sons, one is married, and three grankids so far. We live in a really rural area, nearest full time neighbor is 1/4 mile... which also happens to be how far our private road is out to the main road. In other words... theres nothing to do around here. LOL! Wife and I travel a lot, but with grankids coming along, wed rather bring the resort feel here and stay home more. Were excited, but nervous too. The closest pool builder is 90+ miles from here and theres just not a lot of pools locally to base anything off of, like dealing with the ground water. Thanks for all the replies so far. This will happen, just not sure if I'm going to tackle it, or bite the bullet and let somone else make the $$$
105906
 

SBall

Well-known member
Jun 27, 2017
243
Nashville, TN
We have a pseudo-tanning ledge in ours. Our second step is 48" wide and the water depth is about 16", which is wonderful for us. Perfect for a $20 resin Adirondack chair, great for smaller children, perfect for me to stand and throw the football to our kids. I love vinyl over steps, it looks good, feels good, and is just nice. My steps are custom built with concrete block, gravel, and vermiculite. I would have no issues with a dog getting in. LOL...our golden mix does not like water, which is weird to me. She just lays in the yard and watches us swim.

Your yard is so large, Id go with a 20'x40', or maybe even a nice, big "L" shaped pool that gives you a large shallow end, and you can also put a deep end and diving board. We were space limited, so our deep end is a little under six feet.
 
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