Copper pipe for gas line 1' underground.

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tony 340

Member
May 13, 2010
11
Hello,

I'm putting a crushed glass firepit in my backyard, and while the patio is out I'm running a underground gas line to the firepit.

I was wondering if 3/4'' copper would be alright and meet code appx. 1' underground?

I plan on pressure testing it to 20psi before I bury it and pour.

There was some black iron conduit for the old pool light that was rotted out, so I'm not messing around with black iron. I'm assuming PVC is out of the question. I also heard the yellow stuff has to be jacketed with PVC and then you need a crimping type tool for the ends.

thanks
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
23,046
SouthWest Alabama
Local code is gonna trump anything we can tell you. If I lived next door I might be able to help. Hum, I might live next door :scratch: Where do you live? :)
 
G

Guest

Get the PE (polyethylene) stuff and be done with it! It does not need to be jacketed with PVC, and the heat tool isn't needed anymore either. They have push type fittings that pass code.

Iron does what you already know it does, and copper gets pin holes pretty easy (especially in acidic soil), so that is out also. Just like diamonds ( :roll: ), PE is forever!
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
simicrintz said:
Get the PE (polyethylene) stuff and be done with it!
Simi,

He still needs to check the code in his area before he does this. PE in my area is not code under concrete and wont pass. Not sure what his code says, but if PE is not allowed, he would have to tear out the patio.
 
G

Guest

bk406 said:
simicrintz said:
Get the PE (polyethylene) stuff and be done with it!
Simi,

He still needs to check the code in his area before he does this. PE in my area is not code under concrete and wont pass. Not sure what his code says, but if PE is not allowed, he would have to tear out the patio.
Agreed on checking, although I have never heard of it not passing. Under concrete, with the opportunity of the concrete one day becoming an enclosed room, gas pipe is never allowed. Under sidewalk or driveway it is fine.

If they will accept iron or copper, they would accept PE. But you are correct to make sure before doing any work :goodjob:
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
simicrintz said:
although I have never heard of it not passing. :
Well, you're on the left coast too :wink:

Seriously, the east coast is a lot different on stuff like that. Believe it or not, in places on a commercial plumbing job over 1 story, you still have to use cast iron, no pvc.
 
G

Guest

bk406 said:
simicrintz said:
although I have never heard of it not passing. :
Well, you're on the left coast too :wink:

Seriously, the east coast is a lot different on stuff like that. Believe it or not, in places on a commercial plumbing job over 1 story, you still have to use cast iron, no pvc.
Again, true (no hurricanes, no humidity, no bugs; I'm staying here :cool: ).

I assumed that he was talking about buried pipe. We cannot use PE above ground either, and iron on all commercial just like you state. I should have checked his application before I posted :oops:
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
I think he was talking about buried pipe, actually. You can use PE, you just cant put it under a patio or slab. A driveway or walk is ok. Kind of depends on what an inspector calls a patio or walk :|

Thats why I always recommend talking to them before you run pipe under something you might have to break out.
 

tony 340

Member
May 13, 2010
11
Well, the thing is, I don't really want the city to know I'm running it.

The other thing is I'm pretty competent with copper, and the guy at the fire/grill shop said to just use copper.
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
tony 340 said:
Well, the thing is, I don't really want the city to know I'm running it.

The other thing is I'm pretty competent with copper, and the guy at the fire/grill shop said to just use copper.
Well, I would not want to be your neighbor :wink: . Seriously, gas isnt something a DYI'er should do, period. It's fine stuff when installed properly. I've seen houses and whole blocks blown to bits from improperly installed gas lines. Please consider calling a professional who knows what they are doing and have it inspected. I'm all for DYI and have on many occasions done just about every trade you can think of. But gas, no way. Call a pro.
 

SCCS

Well-known member
Sep 28, 2008
79
Left coast
CHECK LOCAL BUILDING CODES!!!!!!!

They will tell you all you need to know. (pipe material, testing, depth of pipe and inspection's)
 

4JawChuck

Well-known member
Jun 13, 2010
223
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
I have no idea about your local codes but you shouldn't be doing this yourself anyway, too many liabilities involved.

However one product I am familiar with fits your requirements exactly, Gastite meets all the codes I am familiar with and it is jacketed flexible corrugated stainless steel...it doesn't require bonding and is easy to install although I think you still need 18" of cover not 12" to pass without exceptions made by the inspector.

http://www.gastite.com/

Here is a reference PDF regarding concealed fittings approval for the pipe with National Gas Code and approval letters for the US and Canada. I doubt you need concealed fittings in you setup but the document contains a lot of reference material.

http://www.gastite.com/include/languages/english/downloads/pdfs/ConcealedFittings.pdf

One thing I will say is I would install a striker plate over the pipe underground even though its not required to meet code, for what it costs to lay a metal cover over the pipe (once its partially buried) and the possible ramifications of someone digging into it with a shovel inadvertantly later...its cheap insurance.
 

Lershac

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 1, 2007
1,220
Baton Rouge, LA
I would check the codes. Gastite + PVC jacketing (for venting leaks) would pass in my area, but as EVERYONE says so far, it depends on your local inspector. Usually if you are going to run under any type of slab, PVC jacketing would be required to contain and vent underground leaks to make sure they do not find their way into the home. Its also a good idea in general as someone with a shovel might get a nasty suprise one day. With PVC at least they would stop and wonder "what the heck is this?" and hopefully investigate. Underground also usually requires a tracer wire be buried with the pipe for locating, and a marking tape be located a few inches in the soil above the pipe to alert diggers.

My training on gastite DID include bonding the pipe, and they sell bonding supplies for gastite, so 4JawChuck you may want to check your references for safety. (their disclaimer "no bonding requirements outside those mandated by national and local codes" can easily be misinterpreted to mean no bonding required, but most codes require bonding.)
 

4JawChuck

Well-known member
Jun 13, 2010
223
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Just to clarify, what I meant to say is no additional bonding required as you would with a plastic pipe install.

I wouldn't bury any gas pipe without protection, not sure I would use PVC either...even if it met code. Seen too many crushed PVC pipes from heavy traffic overhead to trust it.
 

tony 340

Member
May 13, 2010
11
Well, it isn't going in the slab of concrete. It will be buried 1' below the slab. I already have the trench dug, and tomorrow I plan on taking the ole' Hilti and buzzing through the basement wall.

Is the yellow poly stuff any good underground?

My plumbing supplier for work sells it in rolls.
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
You need a licensed plumber to do this. Your asking for trouble. Sorry to be blunt, but the questions your asking tell me you have no idea what your doing. Call a pro, please. Again, gas is not a DYI job, period.
 

dmanb2b

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 4, 2009
3,734
NY
Tony...1ft is likely not enough. Check your code, that will tell you what is acceptable vs. not, with regards to both material to be used and burial/grounding requirements. Whether you chose to get a permit or not is your choice, but please do not endanger yourself and those around you by trying to save a few $'s.

Outside of that advice, I'm locking the thread as looking up your locally required building requirements should be your next step.
 
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