Considering permanant pool

cj133

Well-known member
May 6, 2018
47
0
NJ
#1
Hi all,

After using our Intex 15x48 pool last season we're considering installing a permanent (or whatever it's called, I mean, everything is temporary in life right?) above ground pool. One with rigid walls.

There are a few concerns of mine regarding this.
First, my understanding is the pump circuit must be on a GFCI. Can I use a 20A GFCI receptacle mounted at the house and wire the pump circuit into the GFCI side of that? This would be the easiest solution for me and I'm hoping it doesn't need to be a dedicated circuit to meet code.

The location we had our 15' Intex pool is fairly level, within 1/2 an inch or so. We didn't use sand, so I'm assuming I would need to dig down a few inches to fill in with sand so it doesn't wash out and re-level it. How deep does the sand have to be? How do I keep from leaving foot prints?

Do most locations require bonding of the water? Does a bonding connector have to be used or would a bonded stainless steel ladder work?

Finally, are there any preferred brands? Looking for a 15'x54". Does anyone sell a deck for these anymore?
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 11, 2012
35,526
6
Tallahassee, FL
#2
All pools should be on a GFCI for everyone's safety. That goes for the bonding. The bonding should be for all things metal around and close to the pool. That includes ladders.

Decking-I have not heard of any that are sold pre-made. That is something that has to be built in place by a skilled carpenter.

Brands-there are many. Doughboy has a good name to get you started.

Sand/bottom-you do not build up the high spots, you dig down to virgin ground. You can put sand down for the bottom if help soften it some. What you do is start at the far side and use a board to smooth it out. I will tell you my installer spent a LOT of time smoothing out my sand and it looked great. That lasted for about 6 months until the divots showed up. They were from ??? heel marks where someone pushed down their foot or ?? who knows. They are small and really don't bother me too much so no big deal.

Some people use foam boards like you put on the side of a house to make the bottom. It is extra comfy on your feet and no boos can be seen. You will have to triple tape it to make sure there is no way for the liner to slip between the boards.

Kim:kim:
 

duraleigh

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Apr 1, 2007
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Sebring, Florida
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#3
I would need to dig down a few inches to fill in with sand so it doesn't wash out and re-level it.
Not at all. Sand in itself washes out so is really not a particularly good substrate. If your dirt is within 1/2 inch of level you are good to go as is.
 

JoeSelf

Gold Supporter
Jun 18, 2014
442
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Glassboro NJ
#5
No, Dave is saying you don't have to dig down for the foundation of the pool. The ground is fairly level and only the blocks under the uprights would need to be dug down and/or leveled with each other. Sand for the bottom is after the pool is leveled, up and you need sand for the bottom and a cove around the base. Pool frame is installed on virgin undisturbed soil.

If I got that right Dave?
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 11, 2012
35,526
6
Tallahassee, FL
#6
Instead of a sand cove I would buy the foam coves as there is little chance of them getting washed out. If you don't put down the foam bottom you will want a small amount of sand to smooth over the dirt.

Kim:kim:
 

cj133

Well-known member
May 6, 2018
47
0
NJ
#8
Thank you all for responding.
Foam sounds a lot easier to deal with than sand as well.


Now I need to find out the story with a GFCI circuit for the pump. I don't know if my area requires a dedicated circuit or not.
 

JoeSelf

Gold Supporter
Jun 18, 2014
442
0
Glassboro NJ
#9
I tapped off and existing 20amp circuit that I had for basement outlets. GFCI outlet in box on the outside of the garage. It is my trouble outlet between 10'-20' from the pool. I then ran over to the filter from there.
 

cj133

Well-known member
May 6, 2018
47
0
NJ
#10
I tapped off and existing 20amp circuit that I had for basement outlets. GFCI outlet in box on the outside of the garage. It is my trouble outlet between 10'-20' from the pool. I then ran over to the filter from there.

Hi Joe,

That's essentially what I'd want to do.
My concerns are, does it meet code in most areas, or would an inspector have a problem with it.

I have no doubt that it would work fine.
 

cj133

Well-known member
May 6, 2018
47
0
NJ
#12
Can anyone tell me what the best piping is to use for main drains in an AGP?

Growing up, our AGP had a main drain and it was piped with 1.5" black irrigation pipe. In the winter my dad would just pull the valve off of the pipe and leave it exposed so any water that froze would just push out. It was fine for over 10 years but I don't think I've seen that pipe sold anywhere in a long time. I think it tolerated freezing very well where PVC won't and I doubt the water down by the drain it self ever came close to freezing.

My plans are for two main drains but I don't want to have issues with PVC cracking if it freezes.

How are main drains usually piped in AGPs in areas that freeze?
 

cj133

Well-known member
May 6, 2018
47
0
NJ
#14
You better check that you can have main drains in NJ. My niece's husband works for a pool company installing and I remember him saying that main drains are not allowed. Was many years ago, could have changed.
Our AGP that was installed in 1986 had one and I've never seen an in ground pool that didn't have them.

Do you remember him saying why? Was this residential pools? AGP?
 

JoeSelf

Gold Supporter
Jun 18, 2014
442
0
Glassboro NJ
#16
Ran into my niece's husband in Lowes last night. I was mistaken. You can do main drains in above ground in NJ. Must be at least 3' apart but he recommended 1/3 in from each side, unless you are doing a deep end. And vermiculite not sand but did not ask him why. Didn't think of why until after.

He was trying to get me to do an inground. A party pool since kids are grown.