Concrete Pool Using the Spider Tie Wet System

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
Forgive me if this product has been discussed, but my search results found no discussions. Has anyone used the Spider Tie Wet product for building a complete concrete pool and if so what are your thoughts?

I have run the gambit on deciding what type of pool to build. I wanted a concrete pool but quickly found out that Gunite was not in my budget even with me as the builder so I had pretty much locked in on building a vinyl liner pool but I just recently ran across this product and it looks extremely doable for a DIYer. My only hesitation is that I cannot find much information from people who have actually used it. All the commentary I find online seems to be only from the manufacturer.

The other strange thing is that when you do a Google search for "Spider Tie Wet", not only do you get the link for the company that makes it, there are also links to National Pool Wholesalers (NPW). But no where can you find a mention of Spider Tie on NPW's website. At the same time, Spider Ties' website mentions NPW by name and even sales Spider Tie kits designed to work specifically with pool kits sold by NPWs. It leaves me wondering if NPW had a relationship with Spider Tie and broke it off for some reason or if they are about to launch a joint marketing deal and Spider Tie just got ahead of them. Is this a new product for pool building or am I just running across it?

"ANY" information good or bad on the product would be greatly appreciated.
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
23,036
SouthWest Alabama
With a vinyl liner pool I wouldn't go to the added expense of getting the "wet" ties. The "dry" ties will work just fine. I don't know that I'd even worry about it on a gunite pool. If they're sealed correctly they're never going to see water anyway. I've seen the standard snap ties used in cooling tower bases all over.
 

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
Sorry I must not have been clear, I have no intentions of using a Vinyl liner if I use this system. It would be a 100% concrete pool with plaster finish and I understand that its just a product for forming walls, I was just looking for any feedback on the actual company and technique.

This system would let me build a 20x40 Lagoon shaped concrete pool for less than a Vinly Liner pool of the same shape AND I can pour a complete concrete pool with a plaster finish for about 60% less than the cost of a 100% Gunite pool.
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
23,036
SouthWest Alabama
You might be right about the cost. I get about $7000 for the concrete installation not counting any labor, and then the plaster, decking, etc. would be on top of that. That seems higher than a vinyl pool but maybe not.
 

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
I did a side by side price comparison between a 20x40 Lagoon shaped vinyl liner pool kit and a 20x40 Lagoon shaped Wet Tie 100% concrete pool. I left out everything that would be required with either pool (i.e. the labor (because I am the labor either way) decking around the pool, landscaping etc). For the kit the total cost was around $10,000.00 (this includes the concrete required to secure the pool wall braces). The total cost of doing it in 100% concrete with a plaster finish (and buying the pump, filter, returns etc separately) would be about $9500.00. To me that's huge (getting a concrete pool for the same or slightly less than the Vinyl Liner Pool)

BTW Bama Rambler, I am in Alabama as well, we live in Ashville. what part of AL are you in?
 

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
Awesome pool Dave, reminds me of one I saw build back in the mid 80's while I was in high school, a friends father was a home builder but had never built any pools he did it just like yours except his was round and all one depth (no deep end) and then a plaster finish rather than the liner.

The interesting thing was how he chose the correct diameter for the pool in order to reduce the sharp angles where each concrete block met the one beside it, even before the plaster finish it had an amazingly smooth rounded interior wall.

For anyone familiar with Plaster--

I am just about ready to take the plunge and do a cement pool. I have done a little of every kind of trade at one time or another (as a DIYer not for a living) so I don't have an worries about doing the plaster finish myself, but it does concern me that I do not see more DIYer willing to tackle plaster jobs. Is there something really daunting about doing plaster that I may not be aware of? I have done tons of work with trowels and floats etc and I know overworking the plaster once you have it on the walls is a bad thing, is there something major that I am need to be concerned about
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
ProDIYer said:
it does concern me that I do not see more DIYer willing to tackle plaster jobs. Is there something really daunting about doing plaster that I may not be aware of?
Because it's really, really hard to do and make it look right. I have DYI'ed electrical, concrete floors, pavers, fences (vinyl, metal, wood), excavation, framing, trim carpentry, sheet rocking, brick laying, well you get the idea. I've DYI'ed most construction trades. But..I would not touch plastering. Oh i could do it, but it wouldnt look good. At least not what i would consider the need to look good for a pool in my backyard.

(I left out plumbing since I dont consider myself a DYI'er with that) :mrgreen:
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
I read it. Looks like it took him awhile to do. Looks like he bought a lot of equipment as well. All together, it's probabably cheaper, or close to it in the long run to hire that part done. To do it right, you need the proper equipment. You also have to figure the time you have in doing it as well. Plus, you only get one shot at it. If it goes on badly, not much you can do.
 

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
Yep, my plan is to get several bids and weigh the cost/time of trying it myself against the bids. If the cost is such that I could actually do a second (or even third) coat if I didn't like the finish that would definitely sway me toward trying it myself. Time is not really a concern, I have a 2 year plan to complete the entire project. My Granddaddy always said, "it's an exercise, not a race".
 

bk406

Well-known member
Dec 3, 2009
2,690
Central Massachusetts
Well if you have 2 years.

My wife would kill me if the yard was tore up that long! :rant: I couldnt stand it either.

I finished the basement myself and it took 6 months. That was enough!
 

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
My wife is used to seeing our property torn up. 3 years ago I had over 100 pine tress cut down, took me another year to burn out all the stumps, just about the time all the grass grew back, I went to work with the bobcat to level out 3 acres of humps and hills to a more level Riding mower grade. Now that everything is flat and green, I just have to dig something up again :whoot:
 

jasonlmarsh

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2010
71
Oklahoma City
I'm also looking into this system for my pool if the actual costs are less than Gunite in my area. On the interior finish, have you considered some of the high end pool paints that are on the market now. Should be significantly less money & labor than plaster, and you dont need any special equipment or tools. I realize it may not last as long but the cost savings might be worth it.
 

ProDIYer

Member
Jul 7, 2010
16
Yes I have researched many of the paint finish products. The cost difference is all relative. For example the lowest priced paint products I have found will only last 1-3 yrs and will need a new application, the higher end products will last up to 7+ years but the initial cost is as much or more than plaster.

"IF" you are doing all the labor yourself (as I am) I don't think you can find any paints that will last as long as the plaster cheaper than the cost of doing the plaster yourself.

If your only concern is the initial cost then the lower priced paints may be the cheapest route for the first few years (when its time to reapply, you could always opt for another method at that time.
 

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