Concerns using a SWG and rusting.

Easto

Well-known member
Jun 27, 2010
118
I am planning on putting in a pool at our house. We live in Southwestern Ontario, Canada to give you an idea of our climate.
Duo Clear
When I first had the idea of a pool it was a no brainer that we would use Salt Water. So we went out and got 4 quotes from 4 different companies. 3 out of 4 advised against Salt and suggested UV instead. Their reasoning was that Salt water is going to cause rust and decrease the life of your pool equipment by a couple years.

I can deal with the equipment issues if using salt means less money on chemicals and upkeep headaches, but the rusting has me concerned.

The 1 company that suggested salt uses the Zodiak Duo Clear. If the pool is bonded then there are no issues with rusting.

Another company that we mentioned this to said we were lied to. They offer both salt and UV and said that Salt will most likely rust your pool even if the pool is bonded.

We are stuck with this one big decision and don't know where to go to weed through all the "advertising" to get down to the truth.

Is anyone able to clear up this debate for me
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
Welcome to TFP!!

My experience (and my observations have been backed up here) is that the higher level of salt only causes a problem with inferior stainless steel, and aluminum anchor cups for the ladder and handrails.

A zinc sacrificial anode will cure the anchor problem. Replacing inferior SS screws and bolts/ nuts will cure the other issue.

The SWCG will be a real benefit for your pool in many ways (see Pool School) and make life easier, as long as you know the possible pitfalls and how to avoid them :cool:

We're all here to help when you need it, and all hope you never need our help, we'd still love to hear from you and see some pics of your pool :party:
 

Easto

Well-known member
Jun 27, 2010
118
I really really want Salt Water, but I don't want it if it is going to rust my panels or anything else in the pool.

We were offered a Resin pool ladder with the salt system.

I guess the only way a panel would rust is if their is a leak in the liner and water gets between it and the panel?
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
Sorry for the delay in responding :oops: (real busy time and I'm starting to move from my condo now :rant: )

The liner will protect your panels :cool: It's the other steel/ iron items in and around the pool that could possibly be harmed by the salt water.

IMHO SWCG's are GREAT and a good investment! You just have to be aware of the pitfalls that can be caused bt the ~high saline water. :wink:
 

svenpup

LifeTime Supporter
Nov 18, 2009
835
Sacramento, CA
The levels of salt required for an SWCG (~3000ppm) are about 1/10th the level in sea water. This level is below the threshold where corrosion is significant for many materials.
 

mickey4paws

Bronze Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 10, 2009
610
S.E. MI
I love my SWCG. Very easy to maintain and our pool has never looked better. However, we are having a problem with our ladder rusting. But as Ted as pointed out, inferior stainless steel can be a problem. We are looking into getting a composite ladder or better quality stainless steel.
 

Vickery

Gold Supporter
Silver Supporter
Feb 22, 2009
380
Perfection, NC
What so many people lose sight of is that chlorinated water - which is what we are trying to achieve- is very corrosive in itself. A standard test of industrial corrosion resistance is immersing a sample in ordinary municipal tap water and replacing the evaporated loss every day, thus increasing the concentration of the chlorine. Two weeks like that will stress most materials more than what a salt pool in daylight will do. Go for the salt!
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
San Rafael, CA USA
There was a long and detailed thread here at The PoolForum a while back about corrosion in salt pools as well as this thread and this thread at TFP. Though what was said in the above posts is true that any corrosion issues can be mitigated, it is not true that the salt is less a factor than the chlorine. They are both factors, but with CYA in the water the chlorine factor is generally lower than that of salt -- chlorine may be the primary oxidizer (dissolved oxygen being the other), but the salt accelerates the rate of the corrosion. It isn't just the increased conductivity of the water that accelerates corrosion, but the increased chloride levels directly interfere with stainless steel's ability to heal (reform) its passivity layer and this isn't a linear effect, though is dependent on the quality of the stainless steel.

Most people do not have problems with their saltwater chlorine generator (SWG) pools with regard to corrosion, but some do so it's important for people to be aware of it as a small potential risk. There can also be issues with regard to splash-out and degradation of porous stone surfaces, depending on the area of the country since regular rains can wash away such salt build-up.
 
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