Color Blind Water Test

jeponline

New member
Mar 10, 2021
2
Huntsville, AL
Just moved into a house with a pool and am a first time pool owner. I want to to use TFPC, but it looks like most testing kits rely on a color scale. Are there any reliable testing methods that have a digital readout or something that doesn't require color?
 

mknauss

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May 3, 2014
37,016
Laughlin, NV
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Pentair Intellichlor IC-40
Welcome to the forum.
pH testing is an issue if you are color blind. So there are pH meters available to manage that.
The FC test is pink to no color.
The TA test is blue or green to red, pink, or yellow.
The CH test is red or pink to blue.
The CYA test is a no color test.

Any issues with those?
 

joboo7777

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Aug 8, 2020
106
McKinney, TX
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Just moved into a house with a pool and am a first time pool owner. I want to to use TFPC, but it looks like most testing kits rely on a color scale. Are there any reliable testing methods that have a digital readout or something that doesn't require color?

I’ve been using a photo meter by Industrial testing solutions that is pretty accurate. Both FC and Ph are NSF level 1 certified.

See link below

Exact Industrial Test Systems 486201-K eXact Pool EZ Photometer Starter Kit
 

Newdude

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 16, 2019
6,816
NY
Hey Jep and welcome !! Like Marty said above, most of the tests shouldn't be too much of a struggle. The PH test however is miserable for many of us who don't have vision issues. Pink, sorta pink, kinda sorta pink, kinda sorta pinkish....... :laughblue:
 
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mgtfp

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Mar 5, 2020
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pH is the most difficult test for those with colour blindness, but it also has the easiest work-around by using a pH-meter. They need regular calibration with buffer solutions and ideally storage in special solutions, but when properly maintained, they work well. The other tests in the Taylor 2006C or TF100 test kits use titrations with clear colour transitions rather than relying on colour shades, and often still work, depending on the exact type of colour blindness.

Theoretically, you could also do the TA titration with a pH-meter instead of a colour based indicator - the TA colour reagents are nothing else than pH-indicators that change colour at a pH of about 4.5. A bit fiddly and time consuming, and it requires a pH-meter that allows at least a 2-point calibration (at pH=7 and pH=4), but possible.

But first, I'd suggest to have a look at the videos from Marty's link above showing the Taylor tests (the TF100 also uses Taylor reagents) and check out if the colour transitions work for you. There are also videos on the Taylor webpage.

Then you could try to tailor the tests a little where required. If you for example can't see the green to pink colour transition of the Taylor TA test, you could replace the Taylor indicator with a Bromophenol Blue indicator, that does a colour transition from blue to yellow (once it's yellow, you're actually too far). Not sure if there are alternatives to the pink-to-blue transition in the calcium test. And for chlorine, there isn't really an alternative to the pink-to-clear of the FAS-DPD. If that is not working out for you, then you could try a photometric based test (accepting less accuracy and being limited to chlorine levels below 5 to 8 ppm) for your regular testing, and ask a family member or friend to help with a proper FAS-DPD test from time to time or during a SLAM.