Cleaning Stainless Steel Grill Grates

SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
Hi Everyone!

Getting ready to fire up our new bbq tomorrow, Lynx 42" Professional:


In reading the manual, contacting customer support, and browsing online on the Lynx website, I'm confused as to what kind of grill brush to use for cleaning. The manual states to use a brass bristle brush. Customer support suggests nylon, and the website says steel (assuming stainless).

Anyone care to weigh in?

Thanks a bunch and happy grilling! :chef:
 

crabboy

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 24, 2007
651
Suwanee, GA
I think either brass or steel would be okay when the grill is hot, and nylon when cold. You can probably even get away with a good scrubbing with a steel wool pad (when cold), if it is truly stainless.

I mostly use a cast iron grate now, and I just get it hot and then use a steel brush.
 

SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
I think either brass or steel would be okay when the grill is hot, and nylon when cold. You can probably even get away with a good scrubbing with a steel wool pad (when cold), if it is truly stainless.

I mostly use a cast iron grate now, and I just get it hot and then use a steel brush.

Thanks Gary. Our old freestanding has cast iron, and I still have the stainless brush I used on that. This new one is all stainless from what I understand. I think I'll try the brass to begin with and see how well that works. If it doesn't do the job then I'll try the stainless. Thanks again for the input.
 

Patrick_B

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 7, 2011
15,006
Midland TX
Me too, I cook on wood coals so I clean mine with fire and steel brushes.

Don't use Steel brushes that aren't stainless. They will leave carbon steel in the SS and make spots that may not come out.
 

4knights

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 19, 2012
431
NE Kansas
Cut an onion in half when the grill is still nice and hot. Use the flat(cut) end on the grill. The leftovers fall right off and the grill smells wonderful. I also brush the grill with a mix of balsamic vinager and olive oil before I cook. If I forget to clean after eating then I'll heat the grill up and use the onion trick and a very wet car wheel brush- hard plastic bristle to knock the bits off.
 

SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
Cut an onion in half when the grill is still nice and hot. Use the flat(cut) end on the grill. The leftovers fall right off and the grill smells wonderful. I also brush the grill with a mix of balsamic vinager and olive oil before I cook. If I forget to clean after eating then I'll heat the grill up and use the onion trick and a very wet car wheel brush- hard plastic bristle to knock the bits off.

That's a bit different. Will have to try that one day.
 

BoDarville

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 5, 2012
3,844
DFW, Texas
I use either a stainless or brass bristle brush. Upon starting up the grill, I warm it up thoroughly and give the grates a scrape. Gets them good and clean so that food is much less likely to stick to the grates, not to mention there's no remnants from a prior meal. I usually run the grill for about 5-10 min after cooking (I set a timer so I don't forget). That helps burn off the remnants.

I've also heard of the onion trick but haven't tried it. This may motivate me to give it a shot.

I also have a Lynx grill. The quality of the stainless is outstanding. Also really like combination of the ProSear and the red brass burners - gives you lots of flexibility.
 

SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
I use either a stainless or brass bristle brush. Upon starting up the grill, I warm it up thoroughly and give the grates a scrape. Gets them good and clean so that food is much less likely to stick to the grates, not to mention there's no remnants from a prior meal. I usually run the grill for about 5-10 min after cooking (I set a timer so I don't forget). That helps burn off the remnants.

I've also heard of the onion trick but haven't tried it. This may motivate me to give it a shot.

I also have a Lynx grill. The quality of the stainless is outstanding. Also really like combination of the ProSear and the red brass burners - gives you lots of flexibility.

Thanks BoDarville. Glad to see another Lynx owner on. I have to admit, my first attempt at steaks didn't quite come out as I had hoped. The sear didn't quite sear, but I'll get it. I am glad that you mentioned the use of a stainless steel brush. I tried the brass but it didn't seem to work as well as the steel on my old freestanding.
 

BoDarville

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 5, 2012
3,844
DFW, Texas
A quick tip on getting the steaks to sear properly...pat the steaks with a paper towel to remove any surface moisture. Then add oil or butter along with your favorite seasonings. Meat that has too much moisture (water) on the surface will tend to steam before it sears. With that said, the ProSear burner on my grill has always been blast-furnace hot from Day1. Today, I was searing an Eye Round Roast on the ProSear before placing it in the oven to slow cook up to the desired internal temperature. When searing the ends of the roast and holding it with 16" tongs thereby placing my hand about 2 feet from the burner, my hand got too hot to hold it there. Had to get an oven mit.

BTW, is your grill natural gas or propane? Mine's propane.
 

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SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
A quick tip on getting the steaks to sear properly...pat the steaks with a paper towel to remove any surface moisture. Then add oil or butter along with your favorite seasonings. Meat that has too much moisture (water) on the surface will tend to steam before it sears. With that said, the ProSear burner on my grill has always been blast-furnace hot from Day1. Today, I was searing an Eye Round Roast on the ProSear before placing it in the oven to slow cook up to the desired internal temperature. When searing the ends of the roast and holding it with 16" tongs thereby placing my hand about 2 feet from the burner, my hand got too hot to hold it there. Had to get an oven mit.

BTW, is your grill natural gas or propane? Mine's propane.

I think my biggest issue is that we usually marinade our steaks. Throwing them on dripping wet probably isn't the best way to go from what I've read. What's interesting is that my old freestanding has cast iron grates and I've never had an issue with the meat sticking. Sear for a few minutes and flip.

Since it was the first time I used the BBQ and the Prosear, I may not have heated it properly either. Trial and error. :) We made burgers last night and they came out perfect. Seared them on the Prosear side and then turned the heat down to medium-high to cook the rest of the way. The rest of the grill had veggies (peppers and onion on one grate and zucchini on another grate). So, I'll give steak another try next weekend (beer brats tonight) and hopefully they'll come out better.

Never thought about searing roast on the bbq before. Good idea! Hope your roast came out delicious.

My grill is natural gas.
 

BoDarville

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 5, 2012
3,844
DFW, Texas
Marinating can definitely result in a wet surface, but it's fine as long as you pat-dry the surface of the steaks. Also, be sure to pre-heat the ProSear burner for at least 5 minutes before placing the steaks on the grill. These two steps should result in a better (and quicker) sear. When finished searing, leve the ProSear on high for about 5 minutes to burn off much of whatever may have dripped onto the surface of the ceramic plaque. Also use your shop-vac to vacuum the surface of the ProSear burner occasionally to remove surface debris that will inevitably fall on it. That ceramic plaque burner has hundreds or perhaps thousands of tiny holes in it through which the gas flows. If enough of them become clogged, it will not heat up properly.

OK, allow me to get a bit technical for a moment, and I would only probe more deeply into this if you suspect your grill isn't heating up properly...One thing to look for on a natural gas (NG) grill is the size of the input pipe coming out of the house. Often times, it is a 3/8" inside diameter pipe. That'll work fine for a basic NG grill but on a big grill like yours (which I'm guessing has a BTU rating of 75,000 or so), a 3/8" pipe could possibly starve the burners if they are all on at the same time which would prevent them from getting as hot as they are designed to. A 1/2" pipe would be better. If you are using only the ProSear burner, you should still be fine though. I should note that these pipe sizes assume you have the (more common) single-stage gas service having a water column pressure of 5-10.5 inches of water (i.e., 0.18 to 0.38 PSI). Some areas have a 2-stage input where the incoming PSI to the house goes from delivery pressure (~50 PSI) to 2 PSI in the first stage and from 2 PSI down to the range of 0.18 to 0.38 PSI in the 2nd stage. This configuration allows for the use of smaller diameter pipes thus supporting a higher BTU/hr at the outdoor appliance than a single stage setup. If a professional installed your grill, they should have hopefully taken the pipe diameter and inlet pressure into consideration.

Now back to grillin'. One other thing you could try is a reverse-sear. You would cook the meat slowly at a low temperature until the internal temperature is within 20°F or so of your target. Then, sear it. It will sear quicker since the surface of the meat is hotter than it would be going onto the grill just out of the fridge. Doing this will require a digital thermometer with a temperature probe during the slow-cook as well as a handheld digital thermometer to test the internal temperature after searing. The reverse sear works well for thick-cut steaks like tenderloin, ribeye, and NY strip. Remove the probe before you sear.

Yes, the Eye Round came out well. Searing and then low and slow cooking (around 200°F) take what is typically a lean, tough cut of meat and makes it much more tender. Doing this properly requires two temperature probes (or one 2-channel thermometer) - one for the meat and the other to monitor the temperature of the oven or grill. I did the slow cook in the oven and the oven temp can vary from the temperature shown on the knob or controls. Also, (and I hate to say it), but I wouldn't trust the built-in thermometer on your Lynx (or any other) grill either. If grill manufacturers wanted to cut costs a bit without jeopardizing the overall quality of the grill, they should discontinue putting those inaccurate analog thermometers on their grills. Even professionals on the BBQ circuit, with their expensive smokers, will use good digital thermometers to maintain their grill temps and monitor the internal temperature of the meat they are cooking.
 

SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
Wow! Thanks for the info BoDaville. Will see how patting the steaks dry before searing works out. I'm not quite sure about the gas line size, but I think we discussed that it would be 3/4" as it's feeding the fire pit also. I'll check it a little later (as we're finally getting plaster! Woohoo).

Really appreciate all the info.
 

SlowRocker

Well-known member
Mar 14, 2015
95
Parker, CO
Finally was able to get the measurements for the gas line, 3/4" into the bbq coming from a 1" header which also feeds the fire pit.

Tried ribeyes today and they seared fine. However, I cooked them past medium. So, my conclusion in all this is that I just need to figure out my new bbq...especially for steak. Medium kinda stinks.

My next experiment is going to try smoking something, any suggestions? Bo?
 

BoDarville

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 5, 2012
3,844
DFW, Texas
SlowRocker said:
Tried ribeyes today and they seared fine. However, I cooked them past medium. So, my conclusion in all this is that I just need to figure out my new bbq...especially for steak. Medium kinda stinks.
Suggest getting a good instant-read digital thermometer. I use a Thermapen which many of the pros use. Now I wondered how I did without one all those years.

SlowRocker said:
My next experiment is going to try smoking something, any suggestions? Bo?
That's something I haven't done much of with my Lynx - but then you're talkin' with someone who has four grills in his backyard, including a wood-burning offset smoker which I use primarily for briskets, ribs, and pulled pork. On the Lynx, I have used the smoker box on occasion for pork loin and skinless chicken breasts to give them a little smoke flavor. These meats do not require the intensely long cooking times of the slow-BBQ'd smoked meats like brisket and pulled pork. However, it does give pork loins and chicken breasts a noticeable smoke flavor.

About the only other tip I can pass along is to ignore the commonly-given advice of soaking wood chips in water. I have had much better results with dry chips. OK, one more tip just came to mind...line your smoker box with heavy-duty foil. It will make clean-up much easier.
 

mk1

Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Sep 15, 2011
125
Miami Beach, FL

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