Can we fill our new pool using water from our pond?

ellruss

Active member
Jun 22, 2010
39
The guy at the pool store said it should not be a problem, that the chemicals will clear the water right up. Has anyone done this? We are on a well and do not want to use it to fill the pool.
 

Melt In The Sun

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 29, 2009
3,899
Tucson, AZ
ellruss, welcome to TFP!
Filling a pool from a pond is a fine idea. You may have a little more work getting the water ready for swimming, but people here have done it with success.
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
23,036
SouthWest Alabama
Ohhhh Dave... Where are you???

Welcome to TFP. :wave:

I'm sure he'll be along soon and put his 2¢ in.

For once the pool store is right. Using pond water should be fine. It'll take more chlorine than public water would but since the water is free you'll come out better in the end. Besides a few gallons of bleach is cheap.

First thing you want to do is get a good test kit and go ahead and test the pond water. You won't need to test it for chlorine or CYA but pH
TA
CH
Are important.
If you have time you can send a sample to your local health department and have it tested. They can tell you if it has any bad stuff in it.

Go ahead and stock up on lot of bleach.

While we're waiting go ahead and put your equipment specs in your signature. The user control panel is accessible under the TFP logo at the top of the page.
 

Durk

Well-known member
Jun 14, 2007
654
New Jersey
I did it once when my well pump burnt out (at 47 years of age). I used an old storm window frame to catch a lot of the crud that got pumped. It looked nasty but all was good in 3 or 4 days. We also did it for a few years when the pool was built in 1946, but that was before I was born. All I know is my parents got fed up and drilled a well about 1950.
 

ellruss

Active member
Jun 22, 2010
39
I thought about attaching something like a Brita filter to the hose but was not sure if it will last long enough to be worth it with the volume of water we will need. We already have a pump in the pond that feeds our sprinkler system and I think it has a filter also.
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
31,691
Sebring, Florida
Ellruss,

You bring up old memories. That very question you posted was what started me down a path to BBB about 7-8 years ago. There's several things to consider but it can certainly be done and you have a great set-up to do it.

Since this is not of particular interest to most folks, why don't you PM me and we'll discuss some details.
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
31,691
Sebring, Florida
:oops: :oops: :oops: Aw, Shucks, folks....Okay, I'll keep posting.

(Sheese, I thought they'd never ask!!)

Ellruss, what kind of filter do you have? (Please say "sand")
 

PoolGuyNJ

TFP Expert
May 20, 2007
3,192
South Central NJ
If this is a new plaster pool, its not a good idea at all! Fresh plaster finishes are at their most vulnerable to staining. Always test the fill water, especially for metals.

Scott
 

ellruss

Active member
Jun 22, 2010
39
I don't actually have the pool yet. Now that I found this site I will definitely delay my decision a few more days while I do more research!

I am looking at the Tahitian54, which is an AGP. The setup offered by familypoolfun.com does include a sand filter. I am leaning toward the 18x40 with a 7' hopper in the deep end. I thought I wanted the Nature2 system but have ruled that out based on the discussions here. I will either get a SWCG or do the bleach thing.
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
31,691
Sebring, Florida
In your case, the sand filter will suit you very well. You will be doing a lot of backwashing when you bring the water in and sand is best suited for that.

What worked for me was to pump the water uphill from my pond using the irrigation pump and push it directly into the pool filter.........then, from the filter, directly into the pool using the existing pool plumbing.

Then, once the pool was filled, I disconnected the irrigation pump from the filter and hooked up the pool pump to the system.

I probably backwashed about every couple of hours as the junk from the pond was caught by the filter. The water in the pool was still greenish and loaded with algae but most of the larger stuff had been filtered out.

Next, it was simply a matter of starting the pool pump and massive doses of chlorine (read "How to Shock Your Pool" up in Pool School) for about 3 days or so and I was done.

Your pond water may be cleaner than mine but I don't think I would've had much luck with DE or cartridge filters......I think they would've clogged up a lot more often.
 

ellruss

Active member
Jun 22, 2010
39
Thanks Dave. That makes a lot of sense to run the water through the pool filter. I was not sure if we could run the pump separate from the pool plumbing so that is good to know.
 

Lershac

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 1, 2007
1,220
Baton Rouge, LA
If it's going to be a gunite pool, and you plan on filling through the filter... Put something for the water to splash down on from the returns or you could wind up with erosion off the pfresh plaster where the jets fall until you have several inches in
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
31,691
Sebring, Florida
Lershac makes a very good point that I had forgotten. I got about a 2'x3' piece of plywood and placed it under each return, then put a brick on it so it wouldn't float away. You can probably remove them after about a foot of water but I think I left mine in place somewhat longer.
 

Other Threads of Interest