Blower motor issue

bamayadds

Member
May 1, 2021
8
Oklahoma
What is the builder doing to fix the problem?
His tech just wanted to try turning up the RPM's on the pump to see if we really needed/wanted the blower. He didn't seem to think a blower was necessary. It did increase the water pressure a little bit but not as strong as we would like it plus there are no bubbles. I think the next thing he wants to try is possibly a smaller blower but he wanted to check with the builder first. I'm leaving to go out of town tomorrow but I will try your test with the clear tubing when I get back from vacation. Thanks for all your help!
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
28,291
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Going to a smaller blower won't help.

A smaller blower will provide less flow, but it has less pressure.

You need to measure the pressure to see what's happening.

Probably a design or installation error.
 
Last edited:

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
28,291
We need the pressure measurement so that we can estimate the way that your system creates pressure vs flow.

For example, if the pressure is 68" of H2O, then the system would be approximated like the Z curve.

If the pressure is 50" of H2O, then the system would be approximated like the X curve.

If the pressure is 30" of H2O, then the system would be approximated like the Y curve.

If the curve is steeper than the X curve, then the system has a design or installation error.

High pressure means high compression.

The more you compress air, the hotter it gets.

Also, the higher the pressure, the less airflow you will get.

The airflow cools the motor.

So, the effect is an exponential increase in motor temperature due to the combined effects.

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bamayadds

Member
May 1, 2021
8
Oklahoma
We need the pressure measurement so that we can estimate the way that your system creates pressure vs flow.

For example, if the pressure is 68" of H2O, then the system would be approximated like the Z curve.

If the pressure is 50" of H2O, then the system would be approximated like the X curve.

If the pressure is 30" of H2O, then the system would be approximated like the Y curve.

If the curve is steeper than the X curve, then the system has a design or installation error.

High pressure means high compression.

The more you compress air, the hotter it gets.

Also, the higher the pressure, the less airflow you will get.

The airflow cools the motor.

So, the effect is an exponential increase in motor temperature due to the combined effects.

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Thanks for the great info and making it easier to understand! I will get the things needed on Monday/Tuesday of next week and let you know the measurements!
 
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