Best Trees for Pool Area?

pjt

Gold Supporter
Jan 7, 2012
207
The Woodlands, TX
I need several screening trees or tall bushes for privacy after my build is complete (Houston area). Any suggested species that won't generate much debris or interfere with the pool shell/plumbing?
 

HermanTX

Gold Supporter
May 20, 2020
771
Katy TX
I will need to have my wife identify all the bushes we have but you can see in the picture.
Our neighbor have a very large elm (I think) as well as a bradford pear that drops leaves in our pool. Very annoying but it is what it is. Both are on their property line nearest our pool area. Also Crepe Mytles and Bottlebrush are nice but keep a safe distance from pool because of what they drop. Will provide more info tomorrow.
Pool - Clear 2.jpg
 

Oly

Gold Supporter
Jun 28, 2017
1,676
Fresno, CA
I like the Italian Cypress. The grow rapidly and quite tall and robust over time. Green all year round and while they do shed some flat needles and small cones they will not move far from the tree in normal conditions. If you use a 2-3 foot spacing you can achieve a good visual block and they will grow up to 2' per year in our area. Do not plant them too close to buildings.
 
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HermanTX

Gold Supporter
May 20, 2020
771
Katy TX
I will need to have my wife identify all the bushes we have but you can see in the picture.
Our neighbor have a very large elm (I think) as well as a bradford pear that drops leaves in our pool. Very annoying but it is what it is. Both are on their property line nearest our pool area. Also Crepe Mytles and Bottlebrush are nice but keep a safe distance from pool because of what they drop. Will provide more info tomorrow.
View attachment 163957
Follow up:
Definitely do not get an elm unless far away from pool. This morning my neighbor's elm tree covered my pool in its pollen. Its like snow coming down. Crepe Myrtles also shed so do not put too close. We had 3 palm trees directly behind the pool (put in by original owner) that we finally removed because they would drop lots of shedding twice a year and became a home to squirrels. Also, once they grew over 20 ft they did not provide much privacy and became more of a nuisance. Things that worked: (large and small bushes)
Thryallis
Ginger
Abelia
Hibiscus (keep 5 ft away as they tend to drop their flowers straight down but are not green all year round)
Yaupon Holly
Plumabgo
 

Cluckr7

Well-known member
Jun 19, 2020
56
Texas
Wax myrtle. Holly (Eagleston, Nellie R Stevens, other smaller varieties). Teddy Bear Magnolia. Dwarf Japanese blueberry (don’t get full size they get huge). Theres probably smaller arborvitae that would work really well but not familiar with how they do in the south...I think they are USDA zone 8 and TW is 9
 
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joepaiii

Well-known member
May 16, 2013
248
Allen, TX
I have read that arborvitae don’t handle the really bad heat spells (think 45-60) days above 100. I am looking for ideas as well. We are in Dallas. There is a site called tree-land.com which is for the DFW area which won’t help folks in Houston but they have a great website with information on different types of evergreen screening plants.
 
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sham

Silver Supporter
Mar 4, 2016
199
McKinney, TX
Italian and leyland cypress in north Texas are very susceptible to a canker disease...not sure if it's the same in Houston, but here you see them turning brown and dying so they are advising not to plant them anymore. Hollies are great--nellie r stevens (the 3 in the middle in my pic), eagleston holly, similar to Savannah holly (the one behind the hot tub). I love my two Little Gem magnolias (the taller ones on each end of pool) some people think they are messy because they drop leaves and flower pods, but mine never blow into the pool.
 

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Sollace

Gold Supporter
Aug 16, 2020
304
Byran TX
I personally wouldn't put trees around a pool. The roots would grow into the decking / shell. If it's shade you need or privacy, put up some umbrellas. I'd plant shallow type plants that won't have a huge root system.

I like the idea of hollys -- They don't require a lot of care. There're different sizes types and those without thorns. They hold up well in the heat and full sun. You could go to youtube and look them up - There's quite a few horticultural sites and holly is very popular.
Texas Mountain Laurel. The purple flowers smell like grape bubble gum. They can be a hedge or a small tree. I overbought these at Lowe's last year. I think I have six right now. They are slow growing.

One I'm thrilled with is Carolina Sapphire Arizona Cypress. With Christmas approaching and box stores putting out small live 'Christmas' trees, you'll find various types like this. It's hardy, does well in all soil types, withstands the heat, and has this awesome blue color. There's another one called 'Blue Ice Cypress.' The main thing is it needs to drain well so elevate the root ball above the soil level. Make a mound!

We've had great luck with Texas Sage. It's that gray plant that blooms small purple flowers when it rains. They can grow into a hedge or cut back. The root system isn't extensive.

I would say a big no on all the palm trees. They don't scream tropical to me. On some the seeds are poisonous.
Hibiscus - Unless you have an extremely green thumb and know what you're doing, skip this one. They don't do well in a freeze.
Butterfly bushes are colorful, fun, and fast growing. But they attract bees and butterflies and shed. This is really easy to grow.
No on Oleander. They're extremely poisonous to dogs and kids. All parts of the plant are poisonous.
 
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Sollace

Gold Supporter
Aug 16, 2020
304
Byran TX
Here you go -- This is a broad search for privacy screen plants. Quite a few videos and I really like this channel. Of course there are other good ones out there, too.
 
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