Best place online to buy a Taylor K2006C?

Aquatica

Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 26, 2010
514
Nassau, Bahamas
Looking to upgrade. where would the best place to get one of these kits? I have the K2006 but like the idea of the 2oz bottles.

Thanks!
 

Lana537

LifeTime Supporter
May 16, 2009
242
The Triangle, NC
I blow through some reagents and others last me a half of the year, so I have a mixed box of sizes.

I order my reagents directly from Taylor. I like that all the bottles have a batch number on them--I call Taylor 3 or 4 times a year to check on the "status" of my particular batches. It's good, I think, to know which are "Fresh" and which are "Usable".

Also, I try to avoid getting a shipment in the hottest months of the year, although I think they offer some sort of cool-pack shipping.

Lana
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
San Rafael, CA USA
The R-0871-C FAS-DPD Titrating reagent 2 ounce size is available at TFTestkits using Taylor reagents in different bottles with fast shipping (and indirectly supports TFP since the owner of TFTestkits is also the owner of TFP) or at Amato Industries though their shipping can be slow (up to a week) or at Taylor Technologies at higher expense.

If you are looking for a complete test kit, the K-2006-C is going to have way too much of the reagents for TA and CH for you since you won't be testing those nearly as often as FC/CC and pH. That's why the TF-100 is a good deal because it has more of the reagents you would likely use the most (it has 2 ounces of FAS-DPD titrating reagent and does more CYA tests as well). Since you already have a test kit with comparators already, you could just order reagent refills in larger sizes such as that for the FAS-DPD chlorine test or the CYA test where you get a tube to measure down to 20 ppm. Or you can get individual reagents in the larger sizes at the links I first gave above.
 

Woodberg

Well-known member
Its funny you should ask about the K2006C kit. I ended up buying one from Taylor directly because I couldn't find one anywhere else. I originally ordered one from Amazon, but got the 2005 kit instead. I also liked the larger quatity of reagents and I like having the acid demand and based demand reagents included. I have trouble distinguishing colors on the PH test and those extra reagents help. The kit also comes with the watergram that allows me to test CSI. I also use the pool calculator, but they are always a little off. Plus I think the analog watergram is kind of cool.

Finally, the PH reagent is different than the one that comes in the TFtestkit. The K2006C kits comes with the R-0004 reagent. That is easier to find in pool stores if I need a refill.
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
San Rafael, CA USA
Woodberg said:
The kit also comes with the watergram that allows me to test CSI. I also use the pool calculator, but they are always a little off. Plus I think the analog watergram is kind of cool.
There isn't a single perfect LSI/CSI calculation since no one exactly agrees on the temperature-dependent solubility product constant for calcium carbonate (among other things). I based my spreadsheet calculations on data that was closest to what the Taylor watergram gave using CODATA thermodynamic values plus CRC Handbook data. The Pool Calculator uses a slightly simplified version of what is in my spreadsheet (it does not account for ion pairs, but that's only a 0.02 error). Also note that the Taylor watergram has no way to account for TDS so it is assuming a certain TDS number (you might ask them what they used for that assumption) so will be too high for SWG pools. Now there is another variation for LSI in the APSP-11 standard that is around 0.1 higher than my calculations. All of these are close enough to each other to protect plaster and prevent scaling.

I have both the TF-100 and the Taylor K-2006 and like certain aspects of each. I rarely use the acid/base demand tests -- once in a while I'll use the acid demand test though my spreadsheet usually predicts what is needed accurately. Like you, I prefer the larger vial for the pH tests and my pH is rarely out of range so I don't need the wider range of the TF-100. However, the Taylor K-2006-C gives you way too much in reagents for the TA and CH tests that you don't need to do very often and eventually the indicator dyes in such reagents will go bad. So really, getting the "A" sizes and complementing with additional FAS-DPD reagent and powder and possibly CYA solution is more practical, or one can get the TF-100 that does that for you (though it has the other differences I mentioned -- the kits are compared here).
 

Woodberg

Well-known member
The main reason I use the Base/Acid demand tests is because I really have trouble determining the different shade of the PH test. I typically will use a drop of one of the those tests to see how much the color changes. My PH is always slowly rising so its just a matter of determining how red the PH test is.
 

Durk

Well-known member
Jun 14, 2007
654
New Jersey
I like the Taylor Acid Demand thing because it is just easier to use poolside--plus, like Woodberg, I don't do well with the top half of the pH scale. It's easier because I don't need to do any calculations or use any computer: on my pool, one drop of Acid Demand is one-third of a jug of acid. Not even fingers or thumbs required. Never used Base Demand.

Same deal with chlorine, I have a DE scoop marked in PPM for LC. (Use it twice for bleach.) No poolside math required except subtract actual ppm FC from desired ppm FC. Need to use the fingers.

I use PoolCalculator for my weekly (or even less frequent) tests: TA, CH and CYA. I have a hybrid TFT/Taylor setup--my original kit is a Taylor K-2000 dating back to the stone age and then upgraded piece by piece. The TFT CYA test is twice the sample size of the K-200X and goes down to 20 instead of 30 and is clearly superior (and yet people on this site rarely mention this difference). On the other hand, my personal feeling is that the OTO test that TFT provides is a total waste of time. I use the Taylor case day-to-day poolside only for FC and pH and I refill the little bottles from from bigger ones kept in my lab (aka wet bar) where I keep the rest of my supplies under ideal conditions not possible near my pool. Refills come from TFT or Amazon, depending on price. I buy 16oz. of CYA reagent, the "C" size won't cut it nor the TFT standard size.

As ChemGeek said, for one seasonal pool, you only need the larger reagent sizes for CYA and FAS-DPD titrant if that is done frequently, as I do. The "C" size for everything means a lot of stuff will get very old.

I prefer Pool Calculator to the WaterGram for CSI because I can play with the values more easily and I am in there anyway to calculate quantities if adjustment is needed. (Also, I lost it). My 'weekly tests' go into an Excel log, my dailies don't, so I am at the computer anyway.
 

Other Threads of Interest