Are there alternatives to a heat pump (but that would still use my existing 220 line?)

anthonypool89

Gold Supporter
Aug 26, 2016
589
Berks County, PA
And...another question....just who is allowed to recharge the refrigerant on these things? I seem to recall the pool company telling me that they can't do it anymore and also hearing the same thing from my local HVAC service people. If such is the case....what am I supposed to do? I think it really needs it. Ran all day and only brought the temp up 5 degrees. I prefer not to go to propane or natural gas, but would like to be able to heat the water more efficiently. The pool store that installed mine just said that heat pumps don't work real well in our area (?) If such is the case...thanks for letting me know back when I purchased it from them 😠
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
21,219
Northern NJ
Pool Size
35000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-60

anthonypool89

Gold Supporter
Aug 26, 2016
589
Berks County, PA
I'm not interested in getting a license, but just want mine serviced. So shouldn't a "licensed" HVAC service person be able to do this? My heater is Jandy Ae-Ti (AE3000) - 121,000 BTU
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
21,219
Northern NJ
Pool Size
35000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-60
Yes, a licensed HVAC person can work on a HP. You have to find someone willing to work on it.

Complain to Jandy that their dealer refuses to service their product.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
4,823
NY
Heat pumps are a weird item. Many trades people won’t touch them. The plumber points his finger to the electrician who points at the HVAC tech who points at the plumber. I have a couple friends that had a real hard time finding anyone to work on theirs. I would guess your best bet would be an HVAC person. If you strike out, maybe see if a mechanic would make a house call. It shouldn’t be any different than recharging the AC on your car.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
21,219
Northern NJ
Pool Size
35000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-60
If you strike out, maybe see if a mechanic would make a house call. It shouldn’t be any different than recharging the AC on your car.
There are different EPA certificates for stationary cooling systems then for mobile cooling systems..

Your government at work.
 

anthonypool89

Gold Supporter
Aug 26, 2016
589
Berks County, PA
It shouldn’t be any different than recharging the AC on your car.
exactly...I'm going to check again with my local appliance dealer, from whom I get service all the time - including recharging the outdoor a/c compressor - so why not the heat pump? I'm pretty sure though that they said they don't do them.
 

Rattus Suffocatus

Silver Supporter
Jun 5, 2019
1,260
Corona de Tucson, AZ
Heat Pumps are not common in the cold climates and because of that many people fear them in those areas. I had a ground source heat pump ("geothermal system") in Iowa and it was absolutely great. A/C was almost free and heat was still cheaper than propane. But we had to call around a LOT to find HVAC companies willing to touch it.

So look for companies advertising "geothermal" systems and you might have more luck. Air source pumps for heating a house aren't good in cold climates.. I'd say north of about the latitude of Indianapolis in most of the country. But south of that they work okay.. and like here in Tucson they are common for smaller houses.

For a pool heater though, since it's used in the summer for additional heating, it will work fine in your climate. So don't believe otherwise. It in theory is more efficient than gas but has less capacity.

If the unit is old and R-22, it might be difficult to service. The replacement coolants then to need other pieces of the system swapped out, because the replacement gasses aren't identical for pressure needed. And the stuff is $$$$$$$. It's often not worth it. If it's newer then you shouldn't have a big issue finding a leak, getting it fixed and then refilling with more modern coolant.

However, even R-134 and newer coolants are getting banned in a few years. So my advice is to fix it sooner than later, honestly. My personal thought on the coolant stuff is that is a great way for planned obsolescence and that is why you never see the manufacturers fight back on every more difficult regulation. Many cooling units use flammable coolant now too which is disturbing to me.