Amp draw on new pump

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
432
Marrietta Ga
I dug out my clamp around amp meter and was playing around with different speeds. I know I was on one leg of the 220V so I have to double it, correct?
my purline 1.65 VS at full speed was around 7.75 amps
At 2300 where I was running it was 3 amps
dropped to 2100 which is enough and it dropped to 2.10 which is where I will keep it :)
If I need to use my Polaris I have the override set to almost full speed and for 2 hours so I just push it. But hoping to get a robotic one when the Polaris needs rebuilding again which is about every 2 or 3 years.

I am not a math major but considering my pump runs 24x7 it has to be saving a lot of money..
Wish I had checked my 1.5 super Pump 2 before I yanked it out.
 

woodyp

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 17, 2010
10,503
East Texas
Wanna save even more money? By all means do whatever keeps your water as clear as you like and makes you happy, but 24/7 is almost always overkill.
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
432
Marrietta Ga
Wanna save even more money? By all means do whatever keeps your water as clear as you like and makes you happy, but 24/7 is almost always overkill.
I know but we like the waterfall for the looks and sound and I like the fact I can keep the pump just high enough to keep the water flowing steady :) The pool deck touches our house so we have a nice view our the back. Like the fact I am runnign my pump for similar cost to a 100 watt light bulb ;)
Also last night we had more winds and storms and the skimmers did their job during the night.

Small cost for the enjoyment
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
14,976
When you measure the current, you don't have to double it.

It's like measuring the gpm going through the return lines. You don't double it to account for the gpm going through the suction lines.

It's all the same flow of water or electricity.

The power is the volts x the amperage x the power factor.
 

Steve_in_C

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2017
331
Kinston, NC
Agree with JamesW. For instrucional purposes, think of it as a DC circuit. Whatever goes through 1 leg goes through the other leg as well. A lot of 240V loads do not even use a neutral If the load is balanced, there will be 0 amps on the neutral. So with a clamp on amp meter. Measure at 1 leg and then the other. Measure your neutral and ground (both should be 0). You should have the same amps through both legs. Using our DC analogy, the power goes down 1 leg, through the motor and back on the other leg. So for simplistic puposes we use Ohms law for motors and Watt calculations with are fairly close do what it would be for DC power. When we really start to use AC power and impedence in our calculations, it gets more complicated. We want to keep it simple so think of it like a DC circuit and that's usually good enough,
 
  • Like
Reactions: markayash

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
14,976
Ok, it's the same thing for current flow. The same flow is going through all wires. So it's just 3 amps at 240 volts.
 

1Sammy

In The Industry
Jul 20, 2017
141
Windsor, Ontario. Canada
wow, now am i going to learn something today lol.... And i thought i was to old to learn something hehe.
My thoughts were that on a 240 volts line each leg would split the load, as each leg is a load ? And if 3 amps were on each then the total power used would be 6 amps.
I have to leave here now but can pick back up when i return on tuesday, thanks.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
14,976
You can think of it as a single system at 240 volts and 3 amps which is 720 watts.

If you look at the individual legs, you have (2) 120 volt legs at 3 amps, which is still 720 watts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pooldv

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
6,750
Northern NJ
wow, now am i going to learn something today lol.... And i thought i was to old to learn something hehe.
My thoughts were that on a 240 volts line each leg would split the load, as each leg is a load ? And if 3 amps were on each then the total power used would be 6 amps.
To understand how 120V electron flow is different than 240V read Why Do 240V Circuits Not Require Neutral?
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
432
Marrietta Ga
I asked a friend who is licensed in low voltage ( which is less then 440V ) and he said you only measure one leg to get the total..Unless your in Europe and they do it different :)
Learn new things everyday
 

1Sammy

In The Industry
Jul 20, 2017
141
Windsor, Ontario. Canada
This is news to me fer sure. I looked at it as James said, two 120V runs. On 240 there will be 120 from one line and 120 from the other line. Each will draw 3 amps and the hydro meter outside the house will record that on each of the two lines totally 6 amps and charge accordingly. OR i should say, thats how i figured it was.
Question from an above post please. It was said that the 3 amps goes down one line and back on the other. So, if it was a 120V motor, where does the power go or how does it flow back ? It will come to the motor on the black and the white will be zero ?
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
432
Marrietta Ga
My understanding and I’m not electrician is 220 goes from red to black.There’s a lot more people that know a lot more about this than I do but my understanding is doesn’t even use the neutral but 110 does?
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
14,976
The current really doesn't go any direction. It's a 60 hz sine wave. The current flows back and forth like a saw.

For DC, electrons flow from negative to positive, but "current" flows from positive to negative because they originally thought that electrons were positive. So, "current" is defined as the flow of positive charge.
 

Soupy

LifeTime Supporter
Jun 23, 2011
111
Maryland
It was said that the 3 amps goes down one line and back on the other. So, if it was a 120V motor, where does the power go or how does it flow back ? It will come to the motor on the black and the white will be zero ?
My understanding and I’m not electrician is 220 goes from red to black.There’s a lot more people that know a lot more about this than I do but my understanding is doesn’t even use the neutral but 110 does?
240V is kinda like having two pumps. One pushes, one pulls. 120V is just one pump, and the neutral wire is just a pipe with no pump on it.
 

1Sammy

In The Industry
Jul 20, 2017
141
Windsor, Ontario. Canada
ahhhhhh. not really Soupy.
I think "maybe" we might be looking at this and not understanding the question first asked. In a 240 or 220 whatever circuit you can get 2 120V motors to run. You can tap off L1 and use the ground ( not the correct way but that's not the issue here ) and you will get 120V. You can tap off L2 and run another motor. Now each motor will pull the amps they need. Each will be charged for the amount used by the power company. This is the same as if one motor was running using the L1 and L2 line . So whatever L1 draws so will L2 and it will be 240V .. The power Do Not come in on one Line and go out on the other. Both are lets say "in" Lines and the power is consumed in the motor windings causing the motor to spin.