Am I doing the CYA diluted test steps correctly?

Splitshot

Active member
Apr 19, 2017
30
Hillsborough New Jersey
#1
To be sure I wasn't adding tainted water to my test I used a sample of boiled water from my tea kettle, and tap water which is provided by the city I live in and could be chemically treated for purity, and did a CYA test on both of those. Results were zero so I used each of these to do two dilution CYA tests. Pool temp is 61 degrees but both tests I ran I warmed the sample up before adding reagent to where it felt warm on my skin when drops were dripped onto wrist. How am I doing so far?

Next I filled the sample bottle with 7ml of pool water, and diluted it with each of those clean samples once, shook well, reduced the level to 7ml filled it with reagent up to 14ml mark and tested each sample. Both were over 100.

Emptied test bottle, refilled with pool water to 7ml, added each zero sample to 14ml, shook, reduced to 7ml, added both zero samples again, shook, and reduced to 7ml, and then added reagent. The results of both of those tests were 60.

Would I be wrong in my calculations if I said that my CYA level is 120? or is it 180 after 2 dilutions. <personal note, my math skills are 50 years old an weren't all that when I was in school :) >

You can laugh at me if you like, at least I can put a smile on someone's face today!!
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
41,197
Tucson, AZ
#2
If one dilution was still over a hundred that means your cya is greater than 200. So in your second test where you deluded twice that would be a multiple of 4 making your CYA around 240. But there is a huge error bar around that number.
 

ping

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 24, 2011
2,931
Long Beach, CA
#3
Tap water is fine to use for dilution as it doesn't have any CYA in it, no need to boil it.

Looks like you need to replace most of the water. Be careful to not drain too much at one time with the vinyl liner.
 

Splitshot

Active member
Apr 19, 2017
30
Hillsborough New Jersey
#6
Draining Vinly pool to correct high CYA

I realize the danger of draining too much water at once from my pool to replace with fresh water. It would take about 3 days for my pool to fill above skimmer using my garden hose and taking out 30% or 40% of its volume. According to the Pool Math Calculator it says I need to drain 75% because my CYA numbers are so high. I have another thread addressing the CYA accurate dilution test procedure, so I know/feel its right numerically. If I only drain 30%, refill, and then circulate, drain 30% will I achieve the same results?

Is there a simpler way to drain and refill in one day? Without risking the liner shifting on me?

EDIT: Splitshot. Keep your posts under one thread. I know it's odd to do it that way but this forum works best when we can see your whole "story"
 

Splitshot

Active member
Apr 19, 2017
30
Hillsborough New Jersey
#7
Ah, never considered that, thanks for answering so quick. I know why its high, last years battle with algae had me spending a fortune on chemicals and shock per advice from local pool store company. I am ANGRY that I spent so much, and still have to drain my pool and waste water and time to refill it.
 

Splitshot

Active member
Apr 19, 2017
30
Hillsborough New Jersey
#9
ahhh, LOL I thought I would get reprimanded for posting a different question in this thread, instead I'm told to keep my questions in the thread, I PROMISE to keep trying to have proper forum etiquette. please have some patience with this old fool

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what about those companies that bring a tanker truck to fill pools, is that a bad idea cost wise and vinyl liner wise to use them? It would take two trucks and be about $475 each load to fill pool back up from 75% empty.
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
9,082
Evans, Georgia
#11
tap water, faucet water, fire hydrant water, lake water and the like do not have CYA in them because that is a pool stabilizer chemical that only gets put in to swimming pools.

So unless the tanker sucked up a swimming pool of water to in turn deliver it to you... you're going to be fine. :)

Maddie :flower:
 

DeanP66

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2014
702
San Jose, CA
#12
Awfully costly if you ask me. How about a 50% drain and refill and run another CYA test to see where you're at? If you're still too high, do it one more time. I filled my whole pool (20k Gallons) in about 18 hours with just a garden hose, so it shouldn't take you multiple days. If you have a second hose and water outlet to use, that could speed things up even more.
 

Splitshot

Active member
Apr 19, 2017
30
Hillsborough New Jersey
#14
Here in somerset county NJ we have shale, which when it rains the water table, hydrostatic pressure is brutal. I have seen a floating liner and do not want that to happen, but you all have helped me so I should just put on my big boy pants and steel myself to the task. I have never drained that much out of my pool, so I am guessing just move my pump handle to waste and dump the water. I may need to check with local authorities to see if its okay to send that to the sewer. Best to check before they come and say I've broken some rule about water use. I just don't see how connecting two hoses to the same system with the same diameter water lines and pressure speeds up the process. Mostly it falls off to a trickle if you tax it that much. only 1" water lines in my home.

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Just checked my last water bill, 4000 gallons of water and paid $42.00. If all goes well it will be a rewarding and enlightening experience.
 

DeanP66

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2014
702
San Jose, CA
#15
Make sure you shut off your skimmer or else, once the water level gets below it, your pump will start to suck air and lose prime. If you can't completely close off the skimmer like in my pool, you can either buy or rent a utility pump from Home Depot or Harbor Freight so you don't have to run your pool equipment to drain.
 

xyz

Gold Supporter
Sep 8, 2016
641
Escondido/CA
#17
By this I mean, get a piece of plastic that is much larger than your pool, and put it over the top once you get a sump pump started draining. Now start filling on top of the plastic while the sump pump drains below it.

If the tarp is large enough, it will sink down but will prevent the new water from mixing with the old water until you pull out the tarp at the end.

Then, there is no risk to floating as long as you match the draining rate with the fill rate.
 

Splitshot

Active member
Apr 19, 2017
30
Hillsborough New Jersey
#18
That's pretty tricky Jon. I have a solid pool cover, 20 X 40 it would work but only until I got down 2' since my pool is 18 x 37 how big a tarp would I need? I like the idea because I usually have to pump off the cover and fill up the pool at the same time, this is the process in reverse. Solution was right in front of me, just didn't recognize it. I use a Little Giant submersible sump pump to clear my cover in the spring, powerful little bugger too, using pool size hose, 1 1/2" it really can clear out water. usually faster than I can fill the pool. So how many time can I say thanks to you guys?? Does it ever get old? May take a month but I think that could be my best solution, after each fill test and see if I am reducing CYA. May not get to slam until 4th of July

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Just had an afterthought, can I still run the filter? I have two skimmers and a bottom drain. Will have to see if I can close both surface skimmer off at the same time, I know I can do each separately that's how I vacuum.