AGP Repair

Jun 8, 2012
5
#1
I have an 18X33 pool that is about 10 years old needs a new liner and some TLC. A main drain was installed several years before we bought the house. The liner was very 'wrinkled' around the main drain when we bought the house and it was obviously floating a little. I found a couple holes and patched them as best I could. The liner stopped floating. Last summer, my daughters friends came to swim and they 'cleaned up' the pool by removing the 'tape' they found at the bottom of the pool. That was the end of the old liner.

I drained the pool before winter and I removed the old liner this week to prepare for the new one. I will be installing the liner with my dad's help.

The straight sides of the pool are leaning out. The lean is more noticeable when the pool is filled. There is a deck around part of the pool and one side wall leans on the deck when the pool is full. The opposite straight wall has a more pronounced lean. However, the buttresses were buried under several inches of landscape rock and that wall is immobile. I have researched oval pools and I believe some lean is to be expected over time due to the weight of the water and inevitable settling of the landscape stones. I also noted, after the liner was removed, that a couple of the landscape stones underneath the side supports are no longer level...possibly due to ground heave. I was also surprised to see that the sand base was extremely thin in some areas and dirt was visible. The straps were not buried in the sand. In addition, the sand was rock hard in several locations and broke apart in sheets.

Anyway, should I attempt to re-level the sides of the pool by replacing the landscape stones under the buttresses...or should I just let it be? I'm going to need to purchase some sand. I have heard masonry sand is often used as a pool base. Is this correct? Also, can anyone give me a sense of how much sand to order if I want to add 1.5 inches of sand to the bottom of the pool.

Thanks in advance.
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
22,818
SouthWest Alabama
#4
I would relevel the buttresses and bottom. 1½" deep sand over the bottom of your pool will be about 65 cuft or 2½ yards. I'd probably order 3 yards to cover the cove too unless you're using foam cove. Masonry sand is good because it doesn't contain any large or sharp stones.
 

cramar

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Nov 10, 2010
1,143
Sault Ontario
#6
Gonna need to fix the section in the last pic for sure. 1 gallon of water is roughly 1 pound so that pool is tens of thousands of pounds of potential energy (probably more with momentum). Re-level whatever needs it (walls, bottom, rails, etc) and then you'll get lots of life out of it.
 
Jun 8, 2012
5
#10
Thanks everyone,

Removed all of the rock hard sand and the top rails are removed. I'm excavating the landscape stone now so I can level the sides. 85 degrees and no shade. May need to run through the kids sprinkler...
 

Kias

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 31, 2009
662
NW Ohio
#11
I can commiserate, we put ours up when it was in the nineties... Next time, I'm putting a building over it and installing an air conditioner. Or just hire a crew.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus
 
Jun 8, 2012
5
#12
So, I think I know what contributed to the sides of the pool leaning outward. The area underneath each buttress was excavated and refilled with sand to easily level the stones. Also, 6x12 inch stones, instead of 12x12, were placed lengthwise under the buttresses. I am replacing the 6x12 inch stones with 12x12. Should I excavate all of the sand and replace with crushed gravel or compacted soil?
 

jarefri

New member
Oct 14, 2008
2
#17
Pool is 3/4 filled! Yeah! I do have a question about the skimmer. The original skimmer (Hayward), which I am reusing, installed in this order. Faceplate, gasket, liner, pool wall, gasket, skimmer. The original gasket between the faceplate and liner was rubber. I am replacing the gaskets. The pool store gave me two gaskets that are not all rubber like the originals. They are cs-301 (interface solutions) and are cellulose fiber and rubber. They don't seem to be nearly as compressable as the old rubber gaskets. Maybe they will be fine, but I am wondering if I should add an additional gasket between the liner and the wall. Probably wouldn't hurt to just do it. Looking for answers from the smart folks at TFP