Adjusting after refill

Fishy1234

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Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
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I drained 2 feet and refilled to drop salt level. Can someone suggest what I need to do next.
Fc2.5, ph7.7, alk70, ch325, salt 2200ppm, cya not sure if my reading is correct doing indoors but 40?. I think csi is -.31
Please advise.
PS temp is 52
 

HermanTX

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May 20, 2020
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Katy TX
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Match your FC level to the FC/CYA Chart shown on this link.
Did you happen to test your fill water? This will help guide you on what impact draining and refilling pool will do.
Appears you accomplish objective to drop CYA and Salt levels.
 
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Fishy1234

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Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
Pool Size
21600
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My CYA was 40 prior to drain so I checked with test strip and got zero reading. Not sure where salt level should be for my non salt water pool.
 

HermanTX

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May 20, 2020
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For those of us using Liquid Chlorine, you will see a rise in salt ppm over time because salt is one of the ingredients in LC. For reference adding 3 ppm of FC adds 5 ppm of salt. I read on another post that if salt exceeds 4000ppm that it is probably best to drain some water. Also for reference, most SWCG's operate in the 3300-4000ppm range so that may be the reason that salt above that should be lowered by draining. Furthermore, I read that a human can taste salt at >4000ppm so again that may be the reason to hold below that level. In addition to draining you also have splash out and rain that helps to keep the salt levels in check. Yours appears reasonable as does your other test results. With regard to CYA, the use of test strips are very inconsistent thus best to rely on the test you did with the K2006 kit. You can always do it again tomorrow after the pool has circulated some more.
 
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HermanTX

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Hey Fishy - I got thinking about your CSI level. The water temperature is probably driving that more negative. Have you played around on the Pool Math app to see what affects CSI? Go to the overview section. Touch on CSI and it brings up all your current data and current CSI level. Just change one of the parameters such as temperature and you can see how a lower temperature makes CSI more negative. Since you cannot do much about water temperature then look at pH, CH and TA. All have different affects on CSI. Those you can adjust in reality on your pool.
Some advice I was given - don't chase a specific CSI number as it is a constantly changing value. That is why they provide a +/- range. You have to be at the very high side (or low side) for a long time before it starts to affect your your plaster so just monitor it and understand why it is at the current value and watch how it changes as your pool parameters change.
Hope this helps you.
 
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Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
Pool Size
21600
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Liquid Chlorine
For those of us using Liquid Chlorine, you will see a rise in salt ppm over time because salt is one of the ingredients in LC. For reference adding 3 ppm of FC adds 5 ppm of salt. I read on another post that if salt exceeds 4000ppm that it is probably best to drain some water. Also for reference, most SWCG's operate in the 3300-4000ppm range so that may be the reason that salt above that should be lowered by draining. Furthermore, I read that a human can taste salt at >4000ppm so again that may be the reason to hold below that level. In addition to draining you also have splash out and rain that helps to keep the salt levels in check. Yours appears reasonable as does your other test results. With regard to CYA, the use of test strips are very inconsistent thus best to rely on the test you did with the K2006 kit. You can always do it again tomorrow after the pool has circulated some more.
I'm pretty sure the conditioner CYA level is low because I drained 2 feet of water from my 5 feet Deep pool with CYA of 40 prior to draining. I need to know what to do so CSI is balanced. When I did pool math it shows. - .3
 

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
Pool Size
21600
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Liquid Chlorine
Hey Fishy - I got thinking about your CSI level. The water temperature is probably driving that more negative. Have you played around on the Pool Math app to see what affects CSI? Go to the overview section. Touch on CSI and it brings up all your current data and current CSI level. Just change one of the parameters such as temperature and you can see how a lower temperature makes CSI more negative. Since you cannot do much about water temperature then look at pH, CH and TA. All have different affects on CSI. Those you can adjust in reality on your pool.
Some advice I was given - don't chase a specific CSI number as it is a constantly changing value. That is why they provide a +/- range. You have to be at the very high side (or low side) for a long time before it starts to affect your your plaster so just monitor it and understand why it is at the current value and watch how it changes as your pool parameters change.
Hope this helps you.
Okay thanks.
 

HermanTX

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May 20, 2020
1,168
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Fishy
Some good reading for you to consider
Calcium Saturation Index (CSI)

Calcium Saturation Index (CSI) - Trouble Free Pool
Note the last paragraph of the article
" Lastly, All users should test their CSI levels when closing their pools as cold water temperatures increases the risk of plaster damage during the Winter. To help counteract this users should increase their pH levels to 7.8-8.0 and make sure the CSI is balanced according to colder water temperatures. "


CSI and LSI Discussion

CSI and LSI - Further Reading
 
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Rancho Cost-a-Lotta

Silver Supporter
Apr 10, 2018
1,700
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
I assume your not closing, correct?

Your CSI is fine for now. Use your spa spillover to aerate to raise pH a bit and you'll be in a good range (-.30 to 0.0). Ignore the test strips and use your K-2006 to test CYA when the weather clears up this week. Dose for FC assuming a CYA of 40. A bit of extra chlorine won't hurt a thing. Good job getting the pool drained and filled. Your chemistry is looking great.
 
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Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
Pool Size
21600
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Liquid Chlorine
Yesterday i rechecked cya and it is zero. So I added 3lbs of conditioner I had left over. Today my readings are :
Fc5.5, cc0, ph7.4, alk70, ch325, cya 0?
Should I add baking soda or wait?
Water is 50 degrees
 

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
Pool Size
21600
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Liquid Chlorine
All of your parameters are within range. Your pH will rise some naturally.
Okay thanks. I was playing with the calculator and noticed the csi would decrease more if I added conditioner. So I'll probably wait a few days to be safe. Temps are down to 27 after midnight and pumps are running in freeze protection. That should raise ph ad well.
Thank you, I appreciate your help.
 

Fishy1234

Bronze Supporter
Jul 6, 2018
270
Apple Valley, CA
Pool Size
21600
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Liquid Chlorine
I went to pool store to buy more conditioner and see what level they thought my CYa is at.
My result:
PH7.5, ALK 70, CYA 0, CH325
POOL STORE:
PH 8.0, ALK 140. CYA 50, CH200

I double checked with a test strip and my reading is very close. Cya is showing zero on strip as well. Amazing that they are using Taylor products to test with and get 140 alkalinity. I have noticed a pattern with them giving high alkalinity readings in the past as well.