Acid and Chlorine Drums filled with water

auspool2018

Member
Mar 13, 2018
5
Sydney
I've got a Puresilk Chromatalyzer (like this one http://www.poolpower.com.au/images/CPS2_black.jpg), which automatically performs the tests and provides chlorine and acid from the drums when needed. I've however noticed that after a while, both drums were filled with pool water.

I've been searching around and found that I might need to buy and install an injector valve (like this one Hayward / PureSilk Chromatalyzer One Way Check Valve - 33501TB by Hayward | PoolSpot) to prevent pool water from running into the drums. I'm however not sure how to install it though? Should I place it inside the drum?

Any help is much appreciated. Thank you!
 

AftonJeeper

Bronze Supporter
May 11, 2017
1,151
Twin Cities, MN
I'm not familiar with that device but it looks like the valve would thread into the drum and the hose would connect to the compression fitting (blue thing). The link you provided shows what I would call IV bags, do you have different containers?
 

zea3

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2009
11,766
Houston, Texas
A picture of how the drums are plumbed into the system would be helpful. I'm not sure if the valve you show would prevent backflow.
 

needsajet

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 4, 2016
4,703
Sydney, NSW, Australia
It looks like you already have check valves on the injection points, but maybe you could order the other ones and see if they're any different.

If they are already check valves, then I'm wondering if somehow it's allowing backflow through the peristaltic pumps when the system is off, or when the pressure is very low. If it was happening due to pressure in the return line, it would always be happening, and I think the tanks would be filling up pretty much right away.

There are a few things I'd do. One is to put the drums at water level, maybe just up on a crate or chair temporarily and see if that stops the problem. The peristaltic pump should really be stopping the backflow, but maybe it's just a little too much pressure being that much below the waterline. Another is to set the acid tank a bit farther away to reduce the risk of any acid fumes causing corrosion on the expensive stuff. That might allow the acid tank and chlorine tank to be separated. It's normally good practice to store acid and chlorine in different places. The worst thing that could happen would be buying some to replenish one of the tanks and accidentally topping up the other tank. I know it's low risk, but the outcome is deadly, so for me it would be worthwhile reducing the possibility.

Hopefully someone has experience with those valves and will know if either or both are effective check valves (one way valves).

Seeing those two injectors on a branch made me wonder something. I'd hate to see it injecting chlorine and acid at the same time right next to each other. Does the system prevent that from happening, e.g. by only injecting acid or chlorine at any given time? I really wish those two injection points were direct into the return line so the liquid would get diluted right away.

I think it's worth a call to Hayward to get their thoughts on what's going on. You're dealing with concentrated chlorine and acid, so it's well worth being sure.
 

auspool2018

Member
Mar 13, 2018
5
Sydney
Many thanks needsajet for such a detailed response. You've been very helpful! My response to the points you raised are below.

It looks like you already have check valves on the injection points, but maybe you could order the other ones and see if they're any different.
Yes, that what I was thinking too. The current valves on the injection points (as in the second picture) also have the arrows, which I think indicate one-way valves.

If they are already check valves, then I'm wondering if somehow it's allowing backflow through the peristaltic pumps when the system is off, or when the pressure is very low. If it was happening due to pressure in the return line, it would always be happening, and I think the tanks would be filling up pretty much right away.
The drums was filled up after a couple of weeks. I suspect that they are filling up only when the peristaltic pumps are running.

There are a few things I'd do. One is to put the drums at water level, maybe just up on a crate or chair temporarily and see if that stops the problem. The peristaltic pump should really be stopping the backflow, but maybe it's just a little too much pressure being that much below the waterline. Another is to set the acid tank a bit farther away to reduce the risk of any acid fumes causing corrosion on the expensive stuff. That might allow the acid tank and chlorine tank to be separated. It's normally good practice to store acid and chlorine in different places. The worst thing that could happen would be buying some to replenish one of the tanks and accidentally topping up the other tank. I know it's low risk, but the outcome is deadly, so for me it would be worthwhile reducing the possibility.
Good idea! I'll do that.

Seeing those two injectors on a branch made me wonder something. I'd hate to see it injecting chlorine and acid at the same time right next to each other. Does the system prevent that from happening, e.g. by only injecting acid or chlorine at any given time? I really wish those two injection points were direct into the return line so the liquid would get diluted right away.
I've read the manual and it said that the system only injects acid or chlorine at any given time. The injection points are connected into the return line.

I think it's worth a call to Hayward to get their thoughts on what's going on. You're dealing with concentrated chlorine and acid, so it's well worth being sure.
Yes, I'll give them a call. Thank you again!
 

needsajet

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 4, 2016
4,703
Sydney, NSW, Australia
Here's a crazy thought and this is really unlikely, but maybe worth ruling out. Make sure the pump is rotating the right direction. For example, if facing the pump, and the tubing coming from the drum is on the left, the pump should be rotating clockwise when injecting.