A Cheap Pool Cooler for the end of Summer

duraleigh

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Doesn't even have to be threaded. Drill a pilot hole through both fittings and insert a stainless sheet metal screw. Remove the screw and slide the fixture apart when you want to disassemble
 

txtroutbum

Bronze Supporter
Apr 13, 2018
46
Houston, TX
Agree with Dave - go with threaded connection, not glue. Good luck.
Yes, I agree...I was not implying I would glue into the return! I have a threaded adapter that I screwed into the return, then slipped the end of the fountain into it, as per post #65, including tapping it in with a dead blow hammer; however, the fit was not tight enough to hold when I blocked all the other returns...so will glue (or screw) the slip joint before screwing the whole contraption back into the return.
 

Yev

Well-known member
Jul 29, 2014
547
Independence, KY
Yes, I agree...I was not implying I would glue into the return! I have a threaded adapter that I screwed into the return, then slipped the end of the fountain into it, as per post #65, including tapping it in with a dead blow hammer; however, the fit was not tight enough to hold when I blocked all the other returns...so will glue (or screw) the slip joint before screwing the whole contraption back into the return.
The advantage of use screw togethere fittings, or taking slip fittings that would normallbe glues and just use a sheet metal screw to hold together, is that you can break it down for storage in a much smaller space. Using glue to make a big Tee structure for a fountain will leave you with a large tee structure to store when not in the pool
 

ckendalls

Gold Supporter
May 17, 2018
76
Clermont FL
Yes, I agree...I was not implying I would glue into the return! I have a threaded adapter that I screwed into the return, then slipped the end of the fountain into it, as per post #65, including tapping it in with a dead blow hammer; however, the fit was not tight enough to hold when I blocked all the other returns...so will glue (or screw) the slip joint before screwing the whole contraption back into the return.
Not wanting to block the returns and normal circulation is why I went with the portable submersible pump option showed earlier in this thread. Easy in and out. Its still working well even in humid FL.
 

Yev

Well-known member
Jul 29, 2014
547
Independence, KY
I like this pump to have with yoru pool.
Big features for me is the 25ft cord, not 10 foot. For safety, this is a big deal in my brain.
Im not sure that either pump is technically recommended for 24x7 operation. These types of pumps are designed for tasks with definite starting and stopping points, ie maybe 30 minutes at a time. Doesnt mean they wont run longer, but full time operation will stress them out.
 

red-beard

Gold Supporter
May 27, 2019
596
Houston, TX
I tried this with a 1/4 HP pump and 3 round sprinklers. I think the holes were too large.

My water temp is down to 88, so no need to chill at the moment. Anything below 90 is fine...

I think next year I'll build a 10 foot pipe with capped T's at the ends for stability. I'll try the 1/32 holes. I have a deep end exit shelf that will fit the pump nicely and use a short hose and hose fitting to feet the PVC pipe. I like the idea of a 1/10 hp pump, which will do 20 GPM at 10 feet of water, and about 11.5 at 15 feet of head. I can control the head by adding more holes. Holes would be drilled at 60 degrees angle to give a good arc. I even have outdoor rated timers (for my Christmas lights) which could turn the pump on at night.

Thinking this through, it would be better to have the sump at one end and the sprayer at the other end, so that the warm water is picked up by the sump and the cool water is sprayed at the other end.
 

duraleigh

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red-beard,

I question whether you will have enough volume of water to make much difference. The spray is airborne for perhaps 2-3 seconds and probably only loses a couple of degrees in that short time. You need to move a very significant amount of water to affect the entire pool and I don't think a small pump is capable. I think you will need to use the primary pool pump.
 

red-beard

Gold Supporter
May 27, 2019
596
Houston, TX
Let's do the math:

I have a 24,500 gallon pool = 204,330 lbs. I will need to remove ~204,330 BTUs to cool down the pool 1 degree. Maximum potential will mean reducing the spray water to the "wet Bulb" temp. A few more assumptions: My pool is 90 degrees. In July,-August the Dewpoint is 75F with an air temp of 80F overnight, and day time temp of 95. This may seem extreme, but we are talking Houston. These are a wet bulb temperatures of 76.4 and 80.3. The average is 78.4

90 - 78.4 = 11.6 BTUs per pound of spray. To remove 1 degree every hour I will need to move 17,615 lbs, or 2,112 GPH. 600 GPH would cool the pool about 1 degree every 3.5 hours. Let's be more realistic and say we get 50% the way to wet-bulb, this will mean about 7 hours to reduce the temp 1 degree, or about 3 degrees per 24 hours. My gain during the day is about 3 degrees and depending on conditions, I might lose 2-3 degrees at night. This might allow me to get to my maximum ideal temp of 88F.

Cost. A 600 GPH 1/10 hp pump will consume around 100 Watts of electricity. 24/7 this will be about 2.4 kWh/day, which for me is around 25 cents per day.

Diminishing returns. As the pool temp drops off, the BTU/lb of flow will also drop off. In my case, 89 degree water will reduce the cooling by almost 10%, and 88 degrees by 20%.

So there you go...I'll give it a try...And if I need more cooling, I'll put in the larger pump.
 
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Tjs011

Bronze Supporter
Aug 21, 2019
44
Houston, TX
I’m also in the Houston area and was getting sick of 93 degree pool water that we had last weekend! I rigged up the 1/6 HP utility pump from harbor freight; they didn’t have the 1/3 HP in stock. Used a 20% off coupon to get the pump for around $50.. It works way better for me to have an independent pump and not have to mess with plugging returns/impacting circulation. I ran it for 36 hours straight and it made a noticeable difference. After some drier air and cloudy/overcast days, my pool was at 84 degrees this morning, which is perfect for me!
 

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red-beard

Gold Supporter
May 27, 2019
596
Houston, TX
Wow! I like the idea that you incorporated the pump into the spray system. I could do that with my shelf, but the other side (15 feet away) would have to rest on the coping. But it would move the sprayer 4 feet from the edge.

How many holes did you drill and what size? Also, what size PVC did you use?
 

ckendalls

Gold Supporter
May 17, 2018
76
Clermont FL
Wow! I like the idea that you incorporated the pump into the spray system. I could do that with my shelf, but the other side (15 feet away) would have to rest on the coping. But it would move the sprayer 4 feet from the edge.

How many holes did you drill and what size? Also, what size PVC did you use?
I made about 6 versions all with about 40” of PVC pipe. What seemed to give be the best result was a 5/64 bit with about 40 holes using the 1/3 HP Lowes Utilitech pump. Also, the sound of the water hitting the pool was more pleasing with this size drill bit. Its tough to get consistent straight drill holes without a drill press. I used a suspended Dremel I rigged with marked PVC on a WorkMate bench in lieu of a drill press.
 

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