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Thread: Calcium Hardness (CH)

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    Calcium Hardness (CH)

    My friend has suggested to me that I purchase 3 "big buckets" of calcium hardness. This will be new fill water. It will also be a vinyl lined pool, which I have read here, does not necessarily require CH "maintenance".

    Factors of our pool include direct sunlight from 8am-8pm and we will have a SWG.

    I just placed an order for my liquid stabilizer and if I need the CH, will try to get them to tag it to my existing order before it is shipped.

    Thx.
    18x36 IG Vinyl Grecian Lazy L (20k gallons) ~ Whisperflo DS 2.0HP pump ~ QuadDE100 filter ~ Autopilot SWG DIG-60 ~ (7) 4x16 solar panels

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    Mod Squad JohnT's Avatar
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    Some pool equipment requires a certain level of CH for warranty reasons. Heaters are notable. No point ordering chemicals without a water test though. Best to have your fill water tested to see what you might need. Most large volume chemicals are fairly expensive to ship, so local purchase isn't as high as it looks at first.
    TFP Moderator
    20K Gallon 20X36 Vinyl Inground
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    duraleigh's Avatar
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    You do not need the calcium Hardness. It's mostly irrelevant for vinyl pools.

    Save the money for pool toys for the kids and adult beverages
    Dave S. - Forum owner
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
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    JasonLion's Avatar
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    If you have a vinyl liner and don't have a spa then CH is fine anywhere from 0 to 300, so no need to add any CH.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

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    Ok, so I gave my friend a heads-up that I was not planning on using a whole lot of CH. She told me she disagrees b/c CH prevents "corrosion etc... on your equipment, including SWG". Of course, she was given this advice from a pool store who wants her to buy as many chems as possible.

    Thoughts..Comments?


    And of course, she does not belong to this forum where GREAT advice is FREE.



    Found this on Bioguards web page...seems this is what she is referring to........
    In vinyl liners, low calcium hardness will contribute to a faster breakdown of the liner's plasticizer. In short, the water becomes aggressive.

    High Calcium Hardness leads to the pool water becoming scale forming which damages pool parts & surfaces. High CH will causing scale build up in swimming pool heaters thereby dramatically increasing the cost to heat the pool.
    18x36 IG Vinyl Grecian Lazy L (20k gallons) ~ Whisperflo DS 2.0HP pump ~ QuadDE100 filter ~ Autopilot SWG DIG-60 ~ (7) 4x16 solar panels

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    Most fill water will already have some CH.
    7,500 gal, IG pool, L shape 22' x 15', 1.5 hp pump, cartridge filter, AquaPlus SWG/Controller, Pebble-Tec liner.

  7. Back To Top    #7
    I will wait for the delivery of water and test then. Buying chemicals, not needed sure can go to some thirsty adults.

    My TF-100 came today, but unfortunately, I have no water to test. Maybe I should play and see what our well water looks like.


    Thx.
    18x36 IG Vinyl Grecian Lazy L (20k gallons) ~ Whisperflo DS 2.0HP pump ~ QuadDE100 filter ~ Autopilot SWG DIG-60 ~ (7) 4x16 solar panels

  8. Back To Top    #8
    Guest
    Calcium does not prevent corrosion of metal parts. This is a common myth because people do not understand what the calcium saturation index is. It can predict scaling conditions but 'agressive' water is much harder to predict and is not solely based on the calcium level of the water.

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