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Thread: Be careful what you ask for

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    Be careful what you ask for

    So our simple vinyl lined inground pool has been draging on for 12 weeks now. I called the builder over the weekend complaining that it's time to be swimming. He came out monday and reshaped the pool to get ready to put in the vermiculite. Well Monday night, Tuesday and Wed it rained A LOT. But he was still coming out today to pump it out and start reshaping the mud I guess. I thought he would let it dry. Now I understand I can't have it both ways so I guess my question is this. Will putting the vermiculite on top of the mud and then putting the liner in cause in long term trouble?

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    PT,

    It all depends on "how much". A little water in the pool and the vermiculite will suck it right up......actually, a damp bottom can be very helpful to slow down the curing process. Too much water and it will create a problem. I think you're at the mercy of the PB to use his judgement. If you think it's too wet and he insists, get him to sign something to insure your satisfaction specifically with the vermiculite.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
    TFTestkits , PoolMath , Pool School

  3. Back To Top    #3
    Well I can't beleive it they did it anyway. There was a crew of about 5 here and it looks like they used buckets to get the water out (there was at least 4 ft in the hopper). and for the most part it looks good except on the sides in the deep end. I think becuase the rain caused some of the mud to slide down the guys used the vermiculite to shape the sides. Now where the steel meets the vermiculite it is cracking. How much of this is normal and will it cause liner problems? Can they just add some on top to patch it make it work okay?

    Thanks in advance for the help

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    How well it can be "fixed" is a little over my pay grade. It is not the easiest stuff to work with but somebody with a lot of experience can probably make it look fine.

    Again, I would suggest a seperate "guarantee" from the PB assuring you it will look and perform well.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
    TFTestkits , PoolMath , Pool School

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    So many great contractors make such bad business people,
    More often than not this is what you get when you push them. You are ****ed if you do and ****ed if you dont. Too nice they walk over over you, too demanding and they s*it on you.
    Also, I wouldnt expect the PB to sign anything. He is not obligated to do that and more than likely will tell you where to stick it. Errors in construction are the norm, not the exception, they get fixed. Not insinuating you are being picky at all but once you accept that your project is handbuilt and will have many imperfections, the happier and more satisfied you will be with the finished product. You have to choose your battles. Just give them the chance to fix it, if it is still no good do not let them proceed or it will will be a perpetual issue.

  6. Back To Top    #6
    kamoo thanks for the advice. That's exactly what has happend here. I really don't want to be picky (trust me I'm on the other side of picky people enough that I don't want to be that person. As you said I just don't want it to be a issue 2 years from now. The #1 concern I have is that it doesn't push a hole in the liner. If just trowling over the cracks will prevent that but I have a few "lines" in the pool when I turn the lights on I can live with that.

    I plan on calling him on Friday. Honestly the PB is a good guy and tries to keep everyone happy, problem is he takes on too many pools and thus relies on a LOT of subs. I was just trying to get the board's advice if this was one of those battles, or if it's pretty normal.

    Thanks.
    Phil

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    I learned my lessons about one off building when I had my house built. I have alot of commerical experience on very large projects, but residential is a totally different animal. All I can say is that despite what the accepted norm is, you better go with your gut feeling and make sure it is right. Nothing about this is rocket science and if you can see there's a problem visually, then there is a problem. Saturated soil is bad news. You can not work with it until it is drier whether it be clay, sand, sandy loam etc. It does not compact when wet, and is typically swelled. If they just pumped it out then poured right after then I personally believe you have a problem that can not be repaired without tearing it out. By the time he spends all of the labor fixing this, he would more than likely break even by replacing it. There is not alot of material here.

    I do not know alot about pool construction per se but do know about concrete. After the fact repairs are not desireable and tend to be ongoing problems. On a large commercial project it would be rejected and torn out, on a residential project it is "repaired". Try to fight it and you will be in court the rest of your life. Not trying to be negative but all I can say is keep the contractor happy but again, do not let him proceed until you feel it is right no matter what he or anyone else says. You spent alot of money on the pool, liners are expensive, there should not be visible lines in it. I dont feel that is being picky. Picky is complaining about your overpour not being dead nuts straight or your pebbletec not having the same amount of aggregate in the corners as the bottom.

    I believe the answer to your question is here: http://www.poolwarehouse.com/swimmingpooltips.html
    Very wet conditions can wash out the Portland cement reducing or eliminating any strength and eventually resulting in soft spots and the possibility of wash outs.

  8. Back To Top    #8
    Update. Well I couldn't stand it any longer and on Friday I called the Pool-Krete people and ask them. They told me that it really didn't matter just to make sure to let the mixture dry. They came back on friday and did some fill in work which made it look pretty good all and all (I think everyone with a vinyl liner complains a little about their bottom).

    BUT here's the kicker I noticed last night when I got home there was water on top of part of the Pool-Krete. Well it turns out that when it rains a lot (it rained about 4 in last week) the ground water runs into my pool. I'm not really sure why and for the longest time I thought I had a leak but it's just when it rains and a pumber thought that it's becuase my yard slopes so much. So in the shollow end right near the steps it is as soggy as it can be.

    Today I tried to use some towels and lean over the edge to help soak up some the water. And it's been sunny and windy here today so that helped. but the part that's soggy doesn't look near as finished as the rest of the pool. I'm not sure it's ever going to dry and I'm guessing I'm going to just show up on Sunday or Monday and the liner will be in. if they don't step in that part it MIGHT be okay as we put water in the pool it will put equal pressure on all the bottom . Who knows.

    More than anything I just wanted to update the tread that the Pool-Krete people didn't see much danger in installing on top of mud.

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