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Thread: PB uses cinder blocks to build pool

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    PB uses cinder blocks to build pool

    So I came across this PB which gave me a good price but when I ask him how he was going to build the pool he told me that he would use cinder blocks and then smooth it out.

    But my question is, is there a big difference between shotcrete or gunite and the way this PB is going to do it. Will it last as long?

    My pool will have a rectangular shape and the dimensions are 16ft by 32ft with the shallow side being 4 ft tall and the deep end 8ft.

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    Mod Squad JohnT's Avatar
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    I've heard of building pools with block, but it's a liner pool that just uses the blocks to form the walls, not a gunite pool.
    TFP Moderator
    20K Gallon 20X36 Vinyl Inground
    Hayward S244T Sand Filter with 1HP Whisperflo Pump. Liquidator C-201 and Solar Heat

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    Welcome to the forum! My vinyl liner pool is built with concrete block. There's no reason a plaster pool couldn't be done the same way although I'd be curious how he bonds the joint between the concrete floor and the block wall.....that would seem a possible weak area but doable, nevertheless.

    I'm curious if he uses gunite construction at all. I wouldn't think the cost savings of block would be that much. Anyway, the method is certainly valid and was a big cost-saver for me as a DIYer.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
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    Before I retired I had a friend that did a DIY pool for his family and he used concrete block. He sealed it with some kind of water proof paint and did this about every 2 years. He did not use a liner. He had twin daughters and wonted them to stay home and it worked for him. At the time I retired he still had the pool and the daughters have gone to college and married and started there family. He has had that pool for way over 30 years.
    Ric W
    My Pool
    8605 gal fiberglass, 3/4 hp pump, sand filter, aquabot cleaner, heat siphon heat pump, tiger river(sumatran) spa

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    yea he said he would use some kind of pool paint after he smooths out the walls.

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    I had a house remodel that I did and it had a block pool with a concrete bottom. It had been there for over 50 years. We plastered the pool and have had no leaks or cracks, that was 2 years ago.
    24k Gallon IG, Wet Edge, Pentair FNS-60, Intellatouch, Intelliflo, whisperflow, Intellichlor IC 40 SWCG, Master Temp heater, Legend Platinum, Two 4 ton waterfalls, weeping wall, sundeck, 12” raised spa, solar and one rubber duck.

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    Exodo, and dr, welcome to TFP!

    Just the thought of pools being built this way brings back pleasant memories of my first pool job ~20 years ago... We did concrete, painted pools that closely resembled house foundations. Though we didn't use cinderblocks (ours were poured concrete formed by sheets of plywood) I've seen many 'old school' pools made out of cinderblocks that have stood the 'test of time' very well (usually the only trouble is the bond beam for the coping, it seems that the techniques they used to use were prone to deterioration before the rest of the pool structure) I'd love to see some pics of their process!! When we did the 'foundation pools', we would pour the floor and then set the 'wall forms' on the cured pad. We would include a 'key-way' (not sure of spelling, but that's phoeneticly correct) to help the cold bond between floor and wall be watertight, we'd also use Laticrete to help the cured and new crete bond and also rebar to keep things from shifting.

    I'd love to see step by step pics of the process they use! I think you'll end up getting a less expensive, though good quality, pool going with this company. However, as they are doing things 'old school', don't listen to their advice on chems, filter systems nor plumbing - ask our advice and we'll tell you what you need.

    Congrats on the new pool, should you ever need help - we'll be here to give it
    Luv& Luk
    -Ted

    Having done construction and service for 4 pool companies in 4 states starting in 1988, what I know about pools could fill a couple of books - what I don't know could fill a couple of libraries :-D

    POOL SCHOOL, TF Testkits, Jason's Pool Calculator, CYA vs. cl chart, (Just a few DARNED handy links!)

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    I actually would to know what kind of filter I would need for my pool. Its a 16ft by 32ft with 4ft in the shallow part and 8 on the deep side. I would like to stick with sand

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    If you'd like sand, stick with sand. I'm not sure I understand your post....are you looking for a brand? If so, I've never noticed any difference in brand nor have I seen folks on the forum post any preference.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
    TFTestkits , PoolMath , Pool School

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    I meant what size and what kind of pump for the size pool I will have.

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    Given the specs you originally posted, your pool will have ~21,000 gallons of water.

    This is the starting point. You then have to figure out how many 'turnovers'/ day you're aiming for - standard is 2/ day so you can size the pump. At this point you need to figure the 'head' (resistance due to the plumbing) so that the pump will work with ~ maximum efficiency. The filter must be able to handle the water forced through it by the pump - the larger the filter the better it will be able to clean the water and the easier it will be to maintain. The # of suctions and returns and the size of pipe and how far it runs and all the elbows also comes into play.

    Mas985 wrote up a sticky on this stuff here, which explains this stuff a LOT better than I can. If I were building a pool and planning the plumbing/ filter system - I would definitely ask for his input!! This is not to say that there aren't others here who also know this stuff and can help, but I would want his opinion on anything I was thinking about doing. Perhaps he, and the other 'flow' experts will see this and chime in on it, if not I'll help you (I'm not totally ignorant of this stuff, but don't consider myself an expert). If I get stuck, I'll invite the folks I know to be experts in this area to give this thread a look
    Luv& Luk
    -Ted

    Having done construction and service for 4 pool companies in 4 states starting in 1988, what I know about pools could fill a couple of books - what I don't know could fill a couple of libraries :-D

    POOL SCHOOL, TF Testkits, Jason's Pool Calculator, CYA vs. cl chart, (Just a few DARNED handy links!)

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    One of the significant decisions about the pump is how much extra you want to spend up front to save electricity in the long run. If you are in one of the high electric rate areas you can get a rapid payback on purchasing an energy efficient pump. There is a sequence of more expensive up front and less expensive in the long run pumps you can get.

    For example, you could get something like the single speed high efficiency 3/4 HP full rated WhisperFlo pump, $450-500. Next up would be a two speed pump, say 1 HP full rated, $550-600, and then a fully variable speed pump, $900-1300. Each step in the sequence costs more up front and less to operate in the long run.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

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