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Thread: Pool drain with cartridge filter

  1. Back To Top    #1

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    Pool drain with cartridge filter

    I was wondering if someone could explain to me just how I would go about draining water from my pool if I needed to replace water. I have a cartridge filter setup and therefore, there exists a little hosebib type spigot on top of the pump. I understand that the pump would need to be on in order to drain via the spigot. My question though really deals with how to go about it as once the water level drops below the skimmers, I would be sucking air. Am I to close the skimmer valves and the cleaner valve and open only to the bottom of the pool drain?

    Craig
    10K gallon IG gunite with waterfall; Pentair CC320P filter; WhisperFlo 2 HP pump
    TF Test Kits - Pool Math - Pool School
    "It depends."- JohnT

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    duraleigh's Avatar
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    Hi, Craig,

    You could certainly close the skimmers off and pull from the main drain. It's also pretty convenient to use one of those submersible pumps ($60 at Lowe's/HD) and it will kick out about 20gpm.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
    TFTestkits , PoolMath , Pool School

  3. Back To Top    #3

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    Another thought is to plug all but 1 return and get an adapter so you can put the vac hose on the open return, run the vac hose across the deck to where you want to dump the water and fire up the pump. You can also use the spigot but since it's only 3/4" it would take a lot longer.
    Luv& Luk
    -Ted

    Having done construction and service for 4 pool companies in 4 states starting in 1988, what I know about pools could fill a couple of books - what I don't know could fill a couple of libraries :-D

    POOL SCHOOL, TF Testkits, Jason's Pool Calculator, CYA vs. cl chart, (Just a few DARNED handy links!)

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    If you anticipate doing this regularly because of winterizing reasons, I would recommend replacing the hose bibb with a standard "T" and a ball valve so you can use a backwash hose and run it out to a drain field, street gutter, the pesky neighbor's yard, or sewer drain.
    This will be quicker.

    Regarding the suction side, yes, you would need to shut off the skimmer and cleaner lines to draw from the bottom main drain. And depending on your location, make sure you note what your ground water table is. If it's high, or you're in rainy season, you better check to see if you have a hydraulic relief valve on your main drain, or you can risk your pool popping, if it's gunite or fiberglass. If it's a vinyl liner, your liner may float.

    You mentioned you just want to exchange water. For this, I would just drain a foot or two at a time, refill, and repeat until you get the exchange of water you need.
    Is this to change out all the water or for purposes of diluting water chemistry levels that may be out of hand?
    Sean Assam - Sean@teamhorner.com
    National Accounts and Commercial Products Manager
    AquaCal Heat Pumps www.aquacal.com
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  5. Back To Top    #5

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    Good catch on the ground water posibility Sean
    Luv& Luk
    -Ted

    Having done construction and service for 4 pool companies in 4 states starting in 1988, what I know about pools could fill a couple of books - what I don't know could fill a couple of libraries :-D

    POOL SCHOOL, TF Testkits, Jason's Pool Calculator, CYA vs. cl chart, (Just a few DARNED handy links!)

  6. Back To Top    #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poolsean
    If you anticipate doing this regularly because of winterizing reasons, I would recommend replacing the hose bibb with a standard "T" and a ball valve so you can use a backwash hose and run it out to a drain field, street gutter, the pesky neighbor's yard, or sewer drain.
    This will be quicker.

    Regarding the suction side, yes, you would need to shut off the skimmer and cleaner lines to draw from the bottom main drain. And depending on your location, make sure you note what your ground water table is. If it's high, or you're in rainy season, you better check to see if you have a hydraulic relief valve on your main drain, or you can risk your pool popping, if it's gunite or fiberglass. If it's a vinyl liner, your liner may float.

    You mentioned you just want to exchange water. For this, I would just drain a foot or two at a time, refill, and repeat until you get the exchange of water you need.
    Is this to change out all the water or for purposes of diluting water chemistry levels that may be out of hand?
    This was a "just in case" post to the board. I have no plans to drain at this point but if I did, it would be for the purposes of lowering either CYA or calcium hardness. Something along those lines. The drained water would run by hose to the gutter where the storm drain would handle things. Although I don't know about our water table here, I don't anticipate that there would be a problem there as I would only drain a couple of feet off at most if this was what was indicated.

    Craig
    10K gallon IG gunite with waterfall; Pentair CC320P filter; WhisperFlo 2 HP pump
    TF Test Kits - Pool Math - Pool School
    "It depends."- JohnT

  7. Back To Top    #7

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    Plumbing a tee with a ball valve will allow you to drain quickly.
    However, the hose bibb is sufficient, as you said, to get the water to the sewer drain. It's only a few thousand gallons at a time.
    As it's for chemical dilution, it's better to do it slowly anyway.
    Sean Assam - Sean@teamhorner.com
    National Accounts and Commercial Products Manager
    AquaCal Heat Pumps www.aquacal.com
    AutoPilot Salt Chlorine Generators www.autopilot.com

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