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Thread: Leslie's Fresh N Clear

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    Leslie's Fresh N Clear

    Hi. I have a question regarding Leslie' Fresh & Clear. The active ingredients are potassium peoxymonosulfate. Does anyone know what the impact of using this will do to the chemistry of the water? Here is the link.

    http://www.lesliespool.com/shopping/pro ... uctID=8147

    Also, a side question regarding using calc hypo? When I use it, it makes the water cloudy. Is this typical? Any way to get rid of it besides vacuuming it out?

    Thanks in advance.

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    KurtV's Avatar
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    Re: Leslie's Fresh N Clear

    It's a non-chlorine shock/oxidizer. You can use it to activate bromine if you have a bromine pool. Other than that, I don't think it has much use for the average pool owner; shocking with chlorine will get you the same result cheaper.

    Cal-hypo can cause cloudy water but it should clear up on its own. It also increases calcium hardness which may or may not be an immediate problem for you. What's your calcium hardness levell?

    Bleach is a cheaper form of chlorine without the side effects.

  3. Back To Top    #3
    Thanks for the quick response.

    After listening to the people @ Leslies last year and finding out these pool forums, I am very leery of buying anything until I check it out.

    Calcium is over 400. The reason for using the calc hypo over bleach / liquid chlorine is my pH level is 7.8 and TA is 125 and I didn't want it to go any higher.

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    Mod Squad JohnT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainman168
    The reason for using the calc hypo over bleach / liquid chlorine is my pH level is 7.8 and TA is 125 and I didn't want it to go any higher.
    The effect of bleach on pH is miniscule, probably far less than that of rain. It has no effect on TA. Lowering pH is easy. Lowering CH requires draining the pool, at least partially.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainman168
    Thanks for the quick response.

    After listening to the people @ Leslies last year and finding out these pool forums, I am very leery of buying anything until I check it out.

    Calcium is over 400. The reason for using the calc hypo over bleach / liquid chlorine is my pH level is 7.8 and TA is 125 and I didn't want it to go any higher.
    You say Calcium is over 400, yet you are using calc hypo? Even with a NEW gunite pool, your getting up to the limits on your CH (Calcium Hardness). This, along with a pH of 7.8, is exactly why your are getting the cloudiness. I'd stop using the cal hypo and start use bleach or maybe trichlor, depending on your CYA. Trichlor (3" pucks) are acidic and will lower the ph as well as add FC AND CYA. Be aware of the last part-CYA. A pH of=f 7.8 is not bad, just at the normal limit so keep an eye on it as well. As JohnT stated, the effect of bleach on your ph will be minuscule.You might want to post a full set of numbers and your pool type. Also, my experience with my local Leslies is that the help is extremely courteous and mean well, they just don't have a clue beyond what the chemical companies have told them. Trust the information you find here OVER the information the pool store or builder tell you 99.99999% of the time.

    Dave

  6. Back To Top    #6
    I thought one of the effects of liquid chlorine was a high pH.

    Also, I should have also mentioned that my pool is fiberglass and the P/B told me to maintain the calcium between 400 and 500.
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    Ohm_Boy's Avatar
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    PH and TA are easily reduced with a little Muriatic acid.
    [center:1kpalu48]Helpful Links: Pool School | CYA/Chlorine Chart | Pool Calculator[/center:1kpalu48]

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    Mod Squad JohnT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainman168
    I thought one of the effects of liquid chlorine was a high pH.

    Also, I should have also mentioned that my pool is fiberglass and the P/B told me to maintain the calcium between 400 and 500.
    Liquid chlorine itself has a high pH, but the effect on the pool water is all but non-existent due to the volume difference. Even if it had an effect, lowering pH is so easy it isn't worth worrying about. Lowering CYA or calcium is harder.

    Typically 350ppm is tops for fiberglass. I'm surprised to see anyone recommend anything over 200ppm. CH over 400 can result in scaling ( if the pH gets too high) or cloudy water.
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    All non stabilized form of chlorine (liquid sodium hypochlorite and bleach, cal hypo, and lithium hypochlorite) are alkaline but the reaction of the clorine in the water when it breaks down in disinficting is mildly acidic so the net effect is fairly pH neutral. Stabilized chlorine (trichlor and dichlor) are both acidic, especially trichlor, and still have the acidic reaction when the clorine in the water breaks down so they will have tne net effect of lowering pH and TA.
    MPS (non chlorine shock) is also acidic and will add sulfates to the water. MPS has no advantages in an outdoor pool, IMHO, but is useful in an indoor pool since it works differently than shocking with chlorine. It does not destroy chlorramines once they have formed but can help prevent them from forming if MPS is used on a regular basis. In an outdoor pool the combination of high chlorine levels from shocking and the UV from sunlight efficiently break down chloramines.

    Bottom line is this. If you are using a stabilized chlorine or MPS you want to run your TA at the higher end of the range (100-120 ppm) to combat the acidic product. If you are using an unstabilized chlorine (or have a SWG) you should run your TA at the low end (80-90 or even lower than that possibly) to obtain a more stable pH and have less acid demand. Also running your pH at 7.8 instead of lower will help reduce acid demand with unstabilized chlorine. I am not going to get into all the technical details here since the chemistry does get involved but these techniques do work.

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