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Thread: Electricity usage

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    Electricity usage

    Hello all,

    Since my account pays the electricity bill for me (my wife) I seldom ever see it or know how much it is. Today I was told that the bill has been about $100 more each month, as compare to last year. It's a bit more than I would have thought, but it's consistent with what others have told me it would be. I'm glad I stuck with the 1hp that the builder dropped in there,. I was considering a larger pump but was given good advise from the folks here to keep it. I've been running about 6 hours a day (12am-6am) with a few hours on the Polaris booster pump. 2hp slide pump has been drained.

    Just wondering what kind of increased electricity usage you guys see when running your pools.

    Gary
    Gary
    21k gal SW, IG Gunite PebbleSheen, 1HP Jandy, Jandy 340 filter, Polaris 280, 17' fiberglass slide w/ 2HP pump.

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    mas985's Avatar
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    A full rated 1 HP pump will draw close to 2 kw/hr. So 6 hours a day and 30 days is about 360 kwh. So if you are paying close to $0.27/kwh that would increase your bill by about $100.

    I have a 1 HP pump as well but this time of year I only run it about 2 hrs a day. 6 hours / day in the summer and I have about the same usage as you. However, I pay close to $0.32/kwh so my bill is a bit higher than yours.
    Mark
    Hydraulics 101; Pump Ed 101; Pump and Pool Spreadsheets; Pump Run Time Study; DIY Acid Dosing; DIY Cover Roller
    18'x36' 20k plaster, 1/2 HP 2sp pump, Aqualogic PS8 SWCG, 420 sq-ft Cartridge, Solar, 6 jet spa, 1 HP jet pump, 400k BTU NG Heater, ThePoolCleaner

  3. Back To Top    #3

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    My pump runs mid-May, 24/7, to the end of Augest and I pay about 13 cents a kilowatt. Adds about $200.00 a month.

    24/7 will change this summer with the new pump.............................. I hope.
    Hotrod30

    20 X 40 foot vinyl Borates and Salt Pool
    Rolachem Chlorine Feeder
    Hayward 27 inch sand filter with 80 lbs of pea gravel
    Jacuzzi Splash Pak SP55 DE filter in parallel
    Pentair VF3050 pump

  4. Back To Top    #4

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    Wow, only 2 hours a day. I may follow your lead and reduce my pump time a bit, the SWG is not producing anyway since the water is so cold.
    Gary
    21k gal SW, IG Gunite PebbleSheen, 1HP Jandy, Jandy 340 filter, Polaris 280, 17' fiberglass slide w/ 2HP pump.

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    hodapmj's Avatar
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    I can't tell you how much a variable speed pump can save on the electric budget! Using a Pentair Intelliflo 4 X 160 running @ 1700rpm for 11 hrs/day giving me one turn, my electric cost is about $10 extra per month. The upfront costs of the pump are high but the savings will pay for the pump in the first 1-2 yrs when properly configured.
    24K gal. 22 X 40' Fox Lagoon IG Vinyl, 7' Fox 25 jet raised Spa, Intelliflow VS-3050 pump, Intellichlor IC-40 SWG, Pentair Easy Touch Controller, Easy Touch Wireless Remote, Pentair Legend cleaner w/ booster pump, Pentair 250,000 BTU heater, Pentair Tagelus Sand Filter, & Pentair Intellibrite LED lighting.

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    ktdave's Avatar
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    With my Intelliflo 4x160, I'm paying about $50-$60 (during peak usage months) extra as compared to before our pool was built.
    11,000 gal. gunite w/midnight blue and white pearl PebbleTec
    Intelliflo 4x160 pump
    Intellichlor IC-20 SWG
    Pentair cartridge filter 420 sq. ft.
    Mastertemp 400K BTU heater
    Legend Platinum cleaner
    Pool School
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    mas985's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crabboy
    Wow, only 2 hours a day. I may follow your lead and reduce my pump time a bit, the SWG is not producing anyway since the water is so cold.
    When the water gets so cold that the SWG stops runnning, algae is probably very unlikely. We don't freeze here so sometimes when the water is below 50 degrees, I will shut off the pump all together. Above 50 degrees, I run it about 2 hours a day to get some chlorine and above 65 degrees I go to 4 hours (1 turn) but it depends on how the chlorine is holding.
    Mark
    Hydraulics 101; Pump Ed 101; Pump and Pool Spreadsheets; Pump Run Time Study; DIY Acid Dosing; DIY Cover Roller
    18'x36' 20k plaster, 1/2 HP 2sp pump, Aqualogic PS8 SWCG, 420 sq-ft Cartridge, Solar, 6 jet spa, 1 HP jet pump, 400k BTU NG Heater, ThePoolCleaner

  8. Back To Top    #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktdave
    With my Intelliflo 4x160, I'm paying about $50-$60 (during peak usage months) extra as compared to before our pool was built.
    total or is that 50-60 the extra amount of the pump.

    during the warm months ( april through october when we use a/c) my bill is HIGH, i mean HIGH , like 5 or 6 hundred a month, with air set at 72, so its not like they cool 24/7 but the pump for the pool runs 24/7 am i gunna save by getting a more efficent pump then, like a 4x160 that i only run for about 8 or 10 hours day. if its like that i would run 4 hours in the morning and 4 hours at night to avoid peak hours. but since my pump is so old it only pumps at half its power and no its not a 2 speed. so i only pump 30-40 gallons per minuite, depending on the day and how well the pump wants to work. LOL

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    ktdave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rollin Thunder
    total or is that 50-60 the extra amount of the pump.
    That is my best guess on what my pump adds to my electric bill per month during the summer running it 8-10 hrs/day while running booster pump for cleaner for 3 hrs/day. Although after seeing the result of my pump run time in my first year, I am likely to reduce my pump run time to 6-8 hrs next summer for extra efficiency.
    11,000 gal. gunite w/midnight blue and white pearl PebbleTec
    Intelliflo 4x160 pump
    Intellichlor IC-20 SWG
    Pentair cartridge filter 420 sq. ft.
    Mastertemp 400K BTU heater
    Legend Platinum cleaner
    Pool School
    JasonLion's Pool Calculator
    TF Test Kits

  10. Back To Top    #10
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by ktdave
    Quote Originally Posted by Rollin Thunder
    total or is that 50-60 the extra amount of the pump.
    That is my best guess on what my pump adds to my electric bill per month during the summer running it 8-10 hrs/day while running booster pump for cleaner for 3 hrs/day. Although after seeing the result of my pump run time in my first year, I am likely to reduce my pump run time to 6-8 hrs next summer for extra efficiency.
    thats what mine adds by itself running 24/7, thats not as much savings as i would have like to have seen with an intelliflo. maybe your cleaner and bubbler pumps add to that.

  11. Back To Top    #11

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    As best I can tell running my intelliflo 8 hrs/daily adds maybe 10 bucks/month to my bill. I'm currently paying 8.4 cents/kw. I imagine the swg adds a few bucks when it runs in the summer. I also increase the run time on the pump to 15 hrs/day. Since the pump upgrade was only another 450 bucks I should break even real soon; pool is only 8 months old.

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    NWMNMom's Avatar
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    Well, I was complaining to my family near Duluth that I think we pay too high of electric costs per kWh, but I guess it must not be high at all compared to some on this board! Wow. Ours is .095 per kWh for the first 700, then .069 thereafter, and because we never use less than 700 anyways, the pool is always on the backend at .069 - it comes out to around $25 a month BUT we run a wood boiler in the winter with a pump and fan (over and above the fan at the heat exchanger in the house on the furnace) that use about the same amount or even a bit more per month, therefore, I think its almost a wash. Even if it wasn't - wow - I think $25 isn't much to complain about.
    18x33x52 Buttressfree Seaspray (Wilbar) AGP - 1.5hp Pentair Maxim w/22" Pentair Meteor Sand Filter, Aqua Rite SWG System, Biltmore Walk In Steps - 2/4x20 Solar Panel Setup - Doheny Jet Drive (RIP -Pool Rover Jr) - finally hard plumbed the whole darned thing -
    Beats Driving to the Lake!

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    Don't forget the impact of the cleaner!

    I was frugal-minded (cheap ) when I designed my pool. I oversized the pipes to minimize flow loss. I used an oversized sand filter. My pump is two-speed and runs on low speed (0.33hp==245Watts) exclusively. The filter pressure is always less than 2. I also use a robot twice a week in peak season which runs on 150W of power and turns over all the water in my pool in three hours of operation through a 50 micron filter. The overall impact on my utility bill has been negligible - I haven't noticed a difference. If you do the math on a spreadsheet it would be average about $4.00 per month.
    16 x 32 IG Vinyl
    Sand Filter

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    mixsig,
    I'm curious. Your robot can turn over your pool volume in 3 hours using only 450w. How many gallons is that? It takes my intelliflo around 3k watts to filter 25k through a DE cartridge running 0-1#. I'm currently doing 13k for around 1.6k including cleaner power.

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    JasonLion's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that a robotic cleaner is moving the water a very small distance, against a very low dynamic head. Thus the power required is far lower than for a regular pool pump moving the same volume of water. Using a robotic pool cleaner as your primary filter might actually be a good idea if they had a service lifetime anywhere near as long as a regular pump does. Unfortunately robotic cleaners are only really designed to be used occasionally, say one cycle weekly, and not for many hours every day.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

  16. Back To Top    #16
    Depending on what current your pump uses you could get a watt meter and find out exactly how much it costs to run your pump or anything else in your house.
    A good simple one for 110v is the Kill-A-Watt or one that can check anything (110v or 220v) is the EML 2020
    Both and others can be found here
    http://www.powermeterstore.com/c112/plu ... meters.php
    21,000 gal Fiberglass (Indoor)

  17. Back To Top    #17

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    My pool is not big. It's only about 13.5K gallons. Point taken about the robot. I use it in peak season twice a week. Once a month in the coldest of the Texas winter (not too cold). It does a really good job of keeping the organic material load off the sand filter. So, I don't have to worry about backwashing too often as other people complain about w.r.t. sand filters. I got the robot at Costco. So, I've got a three year return gaurantee. So far, it's worked great for two years with this setup. Honestly, I've been told by many people that I have the cleanest pool they've ever seen. Even folks who have high volume (high power) filters with diat. filters. The system works for me and is cheap (as long as the robot holds out).
    16 x 32 IG Vinyl
    Sand Filter

  18. Back To Top    #18
    Installing a lot of IntelliFlo's keeps me pretty much in tune in dealing with all of these estomates. The first thing one needs to be mindful of is that we are always dealing estimates so that is exactly what they are. Anyone who says you will save this much is giving more sales pitch than sales advice. Voltage fluctuations, system head changes and equipment degrading all figure into the equation.

    I can tell you this based on those rough numbers that should be used for shopping comparison. Keep in mind, the degree to which you invest is the degree at which you will save. If you took a hypothetical pool motor that turned 60gpm for 5 hours per day and installed a two-speed pump in it's place and only ran it on low speed for 10 hours, your savings would be about 25%. Full flow at high speed equals half of the flow at low speed. To filter the same amount of water will take twice as long but the power consumption is 1/8 of what it was at high speed. This equates to the 25% savings number.

    Savings lower slightly as you run the higher speed for sweeps, jets, etc. To bump up a level of savings you would go into something like a 4x160. Most of these will run as two speeds but the high end speed is usually lower than a typical single speed pump AND the motor is much more efficient. Savings typically run about 40% on this type of pump if properly programmed.

    Moving into a true variable speed pump such as an IntelliFlo 3.2 costs the most, but it's payback is greatest. The main reason being that the speed is constantly seeking the most efficient and that is what a 4x160 or lesser pump can't do. When using a clamp on watt meter on the old motor and then reading the on board watt meter on an IntelliFlo, we find most owners are consuming about 12-15 thousand, yes thousand watts LESS per day. That is the number you need to consider.

    It's the equivilant of leaving 15 lights on in your house every day when you leave for work. That is exactly what we do everyday with a single speed pump. That might not seem like a lot when you're paying low rates of .08/kw as I have seen some post. In California, where we cannot install a single speed pump any longer, that rate is upwards of .32-.35/kw and we use a tier system of rates. So, savings of $5-6/day are easily obtained around here and in a month that amounts to over $150 savings when operating at peak time. Suddenly the $1500 cost to install makes sense. It's not like paying more for gas in your car. There you pay more and get hte same mileage. With pumps like this, you are paying more up front but sending less to the utility ach month.

    The final kicker that most don't realize around here is the tier reduction. If you can knock out 350-450kw off of your bill each month, you are usually keeping yourself out of that upper tier and the higher rate that goes with it. This lowers your cost for all other usage in the home as a side benefit as they operate at a lower rate per kw.

    It really comes down to money that you have to purchase today. If you spend it, there is a return. As soon as you spend it, that money goes to work for you the next day. a pretty good deal in a day when everything else drains us.
    Authorized IntelliFlo Installer

  19. Back To Top    #19

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    Though I have the full Intelliflo (3.2), my annual energy savings are about 50% compared to my old pump situation. The reason is that I have solar so anyone considering switching to a variable speed pump should keep that in mind. It's still definitely worth it, but having many solar panels requires a fairly large flow rate -- in my case, 12 panels for 48 GPM total flow rate. When the solar is on my power consumption is 1500 Watts. When it is off, I'm at 26 GPM and only 275 Watts. The 50% annual savings is when running the solar for a little over 4 hours each day during the summer.

    My original system had a single-speed 1 HP pump that consumed about 1800 Watts. I also had a 3/4 HP booster pump for the pressure-side pool cleaner on a dedicated line and consumed about 1500 Watts. My annual operating cost due to the 32 cent per KWh tier was almost $1400. Now it's around $700. I replaced both pumps and have a valve that switches to the dedicated line to a pool sweep (The Pool Cleaner) that doesn't need as much flow (it runs at 15 GPM and the pump consumes 540 Watts during use of the pool sweep).

    If I didn't have solar, then the annual cost would only be $278 or a savings of 80% at a minimum and probably more due to most of the usage being in a lower tier.

    Richard
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

  20. Back To Top    #20
    JasonLion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by repair_guy
    If you took a hypothetical pool motor that turned 60gpm for 5 hours per day and installed a two-speed pump in it's place and only ran it on low speed for 10 hours, your savings would be about 25%. Full flow at high speed equals half of the flow at low speed. To filter the same amount of water will take twice as long but the power consumption is 1/8 of what it was at high speed. This equates to the 25% savings number.
    Considering only standard two speed pumps: An ideal motor would use 1/4 of the electricity per unit time on low speed, but run for twice as long to get the same total flow, so use 1/2 of the total electricity for the same gallons moved as at high speed. Real motors aren't perfect and the inefficiencies compared to an ideal motor don't scale with the speed in the same way so you don't actually save the full 50%. In practice the electrical usage is more like 1/3 per unit time (instead of 1/4) on low speed as compared to high speed. Run twice as long to get the same amount of water filtered, total electrical usage is 2/3 as high, so you actually save about 33% if you switch to low speed for twice as long.

    One of the big advantages of modern variable speed motors is that they can start up at a fairly high speed to insure proper priming and then slow to a much lower speed for most of the time. That allows them to run at lower speeds than you could reliably achieve with a very small standard single or dual speed pump. The modern variable speed pumps also have a higher inherent efficiency because they use a different, more expensive, motor design.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

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