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Thread: Newbie Plumbing Pool Kit???

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    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
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    30

    Newbie Plumbing Pool Kit???

    I am new at the forum and will like to thank everyone that had help in different ways to ensure people like myself and many others can make their dreams a reality. I will be returning home for a two week vacation from Afghanistan, during this time I am planning on installing an inground vinyl lined pool 18 x 36. I am subcontracting the electrical part and the deck work. I am not a plumber but I believe I can do the job, the kit includes everything needed with the exception of the PVC piping. I am a mechanic and have good common sence, but have never done any new plumbing in the past. I believe I can take the task and save $1,500 which is the cheapest I been cuoted in the San Antonio TX area were I'm from. My time for this project is limited and this might be the difference between doing the work myself or letting a plumber take care of it, which I will hate to do!
    Can I handle the task and how long you believe it should take?
    Your help is greatly appreciated.

    Pool Specs:
    18' x 36' Depth 3' 1/2" to 8' Appr. 30,000 gal.
    Hayward Super Pump 1 1/2hp and Pro Series sand filter 300 lab
    Automatic Clorinator, In Line
    Intermatic Pool timer
    1 skimmer and 2 main drains
    *18' x 36' Inground Vynil *Depth 3' 1/2" to 8' Appr. 26,000 gal. *Hayward Super Pump 1 1/2hp and Pro Series sand filter 300 *Automatic Clorinator *In Line Intermatic Pool timer *1 skimmer and 2 main drains *TF 100 test kit

  2. Back To Top    #2
    There are several folks here who have installed their own IG pools... I think the biggest factor with any pool install is leveling out the site.

    You can do it. We can help!

    Now I sound like a commercial!

    8000 gallon 20' x 48" round vinyl frame pool, 12" sand filter (don't have the specs on the pump), TF100 test kit
    Handy Links: PoolMath, TF-100 Test Kit, Pool School, CYA-Chlorine Chart
    "Shock" is a process, not a product!

  3. Back To Top    #3
    JasonLion's Avatar
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    May 2007
    Location
    Silver Spring, MD
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    37,887
    PVC is fairly easy to work with. On short runs you need to measure fairly carefully and when making the "final" connection of any given segment you need to plan a little in advance so you have enough give in the pipe to get the joint together (or just use a union there).

    On an inground pool the trenching can be the most troublesome part of the pumbing. That of course depends on what kind of soil you are working with, what heavy equipment you rent, and what you run into along the way (roots, rocks, utility lines, etc). The other potential time sink is running back to the store to get the one fitting you forgot (except of course for the other fitting you forgot but haven't noticed yet; requiring yet another trip).

    I would guess two days for plumbing. It really ought to be one day but there is usually something that will hang you up and end up wasting time.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

  4. Back To Top    #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    30
    Once again I will like to thank The Mermaid Queen and JasonLion for the help. It sounds to me like I will be tackling the plumbing part and saving my hard earned $$. I have done allot of research and read a few pool install manuals for the same type of installation and they recommend the plumbing to be tested for leaks at least twice, do you recommend me to get a plumber to verify my work and conduct a pressure test to ensure it is leak free? Do you know of a way I can pressurize and test the work myself? I have an air compressor at home, will I be able to use it for this test?
    I will be digging the piping trench 18" deep and the equipment pad which will be approx. 15' from the closest pool corner. I have also read that it ask you to make sure your equipment pad is leveled with the water level and that you are not running down hill with your piping or you will have drainage problems, but it doesn't go into details; can you guys explain this to me a little better? I want to make sure I am close of being 100% sure about what I am doing, specially with something like the plumbing that once it's done and covered their is no way back!
    Thanks once again in advance, 4 days and I will be home
    *18' x 36' Inground Vynil *Depth 3' 1/2" to 8' Appr. 26,000 gal. *Hayward Super Pump 1 1/2hp and Pro Series sand filter 300 *Automatic Clorinator *In Line Intermatic Pool timer *1 skimmer and 2 main drains *TF 100 test kit

  5. Back To Top    #5
    JasonLion's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Silver Spring, MD
    Posts
    37,887
    There are two issues. If the pump is below the waterline you will have pool water draining out of the pump each time you take off the strainer basket lid. This can be compensated for by having valves that turn off the pipes to the pool, but they can be annoying long term and left closed by accident can cause pump damage. If the pump is too far above the water line (several feet) then it may not prime reliabably. The pump has to draw the water up the pipe by creating a vacuum. Most pumps are rated to prime several feet of pipe, but the less it needs to prime the quicker to start up and more reliable the whole system will be.

    Personally, I like to have the pump strainer basket be just above (say 1" or 2" above) the highest plasuible waterline. There is a reasonable range of heights that will all be totaly fine, top of the strainer basket from 2 inchs below to 1 or 2 feet above the top of the skimmer plate. Many pools exceed that in both directions and still nothing goes significantly wrong. Depending on the pump something like 5 to 8 feet above water line is the highest you can possibly go, and near there you are likely to have problems priming. You can go quite a bit below waterline as long as you are careful with turning on and off the valves to block flow any time the system is being opened.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

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