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Thread: Pool chemistry for heater

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    Pool chemistry for heater

    Dad's new pool has one of the h series Hayward's. Not sure yet which one, but assume they all require the same water chemistry.

    From their guide, Hayward recommends-

    PH- 7.2-7.8
    Chlorine- 1-3 ppm
    ALK- 80-100 for sodium hypochlorite
    CAL- 200-400

    PH and ALK I understand, and I'm currently working to get the ALK down to 80 (started at 240 from high fill water, down to 140 today), and when I hit my targets we plan to add borates for stability, algae prevention, clarity and feel. I assume borates with a heater is ok?

    Chlorine I assume I can ignore as long as I follow the CYA adjusted values? I'm running his about 4.5 ppm right now with a CYA of 45ish. Pool is crystal clear and staying that way at these levels.

    Since it's a vinyl liner pool, I had assumed I could ignore CAL. I've not tested it at all, never do in my VL pool either, but I don't want to risk damaging the heater. I had thought CAL to watch as it could lead to scaling if your chemistry got out of whack, but the low recommendation confuses me. Should I test and adjust to keep CAL in these ranges?

    Thanks

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    frustratedpoolmom's Avatar
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    Re: Pool chemistry for heater

    Ignore the chlorine recommendation, keeping the CYA relationship is more important
    The calcium - its' not required for vinyl, but you might want to maintain the lowest recommendation just to maintain the warranty. Once the warranty is up I wouldn't worry about it.
    Helpful links: Pool School; CYA/Chlorine Chart
    24' round AG pool, 52" high, Raypak heater; Waterway 2 spd Pump;
    150 Sq ft. Clearwater Cartridge Filter; Former and DISSATISFIED "Pool Frog" owner
    http://www.PerfectlyClearPoolService.com

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    Re: Pool chemistry for heater

    Those are the 'standard' ranges that are always recommened by just about every manufacturer. Some people will argue that calcium is needed to protect the heat exhanger and while it is true that a layer of scale in the heat exchanger will help prevent corrosion the factors that have the GREATEST effect will be pH (never let it drop below 7.2 and, actually, try to run it around 7.5-7.8 normally.
    Also, there is some indication that certain ions in the water, such as sulfates, can lead to corrosion so try to stay away from the dry acid and MPS.

    Bottom line, what is recommended is a good idea to follow while the unit is under warranty.

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    Re: Pool chemistry for heater

    Thanks

    As for the "ph never below 7.2", I assume short stints at 7.0 when you're lowering alk with MA (always back up to 7.6ish after 24 hours of aeration so far) is ok?

    I had a chance to stop by at lunch and test calcium, our municipal water which was used to fill the pool and the pool both test at 400 ppm, so at least I can quit worrying about too low and we won't be adding any calcium hypochlorite for sure

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    frustratedpoolmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    SWSuburban Chicago, IL
    Posts
    11,963

    Re: Pool chemistry for heater

    Yes, it's the long-term low ph that is corrosive.
    Helpful links: Pool School; CYA/Chlorine Chart
    24' round AG pool, 52" high, Raypak heater; Waterway 2 spd Pump;
    150 Sq ft. Clearwater Cartridge Filter; Former and DISSATISFIED "Pool Frog" owner
    http://www.PerfectlyClearPoolService.com

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