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Thread: coping suggestions for salt water durability

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    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Plano, TX
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    coping suggestions for salt water durability

    We're trying to choose new coping for a pool remodel that will probably include a salt system. I've heard all the horror stories about the salt tearing up flagstone, limestone, etc. Does anyone know if certain types of stone are more dense, or otherwise resistant to this problem? We are looking at Oklahoma flagstone, Calico (limestone??), or Arkansas flagstone.
    Also, has anyone had any luck using sealers to delay this decay?
    Thanks for any advice!
    28K IG, stonescapes pebble, raised spa, hayward heater, Pentair Intelliflo, Pentair 60ft DE filter, built around 1980, remodeled 2007.

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    divnkd101's Avatar
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    Mar 2007
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    I am new to the SWG system myself. I have flagstone as coping. I had a few issues with my Spraydeck installation (painting overspray) that was resolved by the pool builder having to sand down some of my flagstone to remove paint. Ever since that sanding, I have had an issue with what appears to be a flagstone dust/dirt that would settle on my landings in the pool that I could not get rid of. After a thorough cleaning and scrubbing of the flagstone, just this past weekend I applied a sealer to my flagstone, vacuumed the pool, making sure all of the remnance were gone. 4 days running now and I have very little dust/dirt build up on my tanning ledge.

    So, I can answer the last question in saying that so far for me, the sealer has helped. I am sure that others with more experience than me will chime in as well.

    BTW, Welcome to TFP!!!!!!!!!!
    MIKE

    21K Inground Custom w/ Spa (Gunite/Plaster), SWCG, Hayward Northstar, Polaris 280, Hayward Color Logics, Jandy PS-8

  3. Back To Top    #3

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    I wrote a little bit about this topic on this post. Sealing will always help, but it is the softer stones that would be more susceptible to damage and this can be roughly determined by the water bead test mentioned in the post. Rinsing off the area where splash-out or dripping occurs will also help a lot. You should consult a stone expert since they are more aware of the proper care and maintenance of their stone products.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

  4. Back To Top    #4

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    anyone use a cast stone product around the pool? We're looking at a cast stone from Noble Tile that they said would probably be more resistant to decay than limestone or flagstone. They also said to stay away from travertine, which is contrary to what I've read on other posts. Now I'm really confused! Anyway, I think the cast stone is closer to concrete than it is to stone as far as its composition, so I am guessing that would be a good thing?? As I said though, COMPLETE guess!
    28K IG, stonescapes pebble, raised spa, hayward heater, Pentair Intelliflo, Pentair 60ft DE filter, built around 1980, remodeled 2007.

  5. Back To Top    #5

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    If by "cast stone" they are referring to some of the manufactured compressed stones including limestone, then yes these are very hard -- much harder than the native stone from which they are made. They are much more impervious to water and should be much more resistant to salt water damage. Do the water drop bead test referred to in the link I gave in my previous post. That will confirm the water resistance of the stone. If the stone is impervious to water, then it should not be affected by salt water either. The salt can't get into the stone if water can't get in.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

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