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Thread: commercial pool

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    commercial pool

    The articles in pool school reference residential pools. Do the same rules apply to commercial pools? We are open 24/7 and I'd love to convert to this method of care. I'm just concerned about the disclaimer. Also, is there a sub-forum on this site dedicated to commercial pool care?

    Thanks,
    Mike
    90,000 gallon, in-ground, 3 pumps / sand filters, in-line chlorinator on #2. Learning on the job!

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    Mr Bruce's Avatar
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    Re: commercial pool

    If you do a search (top right) there are a few threads. After skimming through two pages, this is what I get:

    - There may be local codes you need to follow, e.g. FC between 1-8, etc.
    - You will need to test multiple times a day. I think the reasons are obvious.

    A 90k gallon pool is just a little over twice mine, so I personally wouldn't be intimidated, that would be 1-3 gallons a bleach a day based on bather load.

    Last consideration, I wonder how indoor pools get rid of CC without sun..

    e: 1/2 -> twice, 90 -> 90k
    32K gallon Plaster - 1hp Hayward 2 speed Super Pump - Hayward S200 Sand Filter - TF100XL
    Test Kits - Pool Math - Chlorine/CYA/Target/Slam Chart

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    Mod Squad JVTrain's Avatar
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    Re: commercial pool

    While I can say that the methods taught here on TFP would work for commercial pools, there are many local, state and federal regulations that commercial pools are bound by. In some cases, the recommendation here may not comply with these regulations even though they are a proven and safe method of residential pool care. A few other experts here with more experience with commercial pools and those regulations may be able to chime in with further details, but there is no forum on here to address commercial pools because they are outside the scope of this site and present additional liability that residential pools do not.
    Joel - TFP Moderator - Minnesota - **Become a TFP Supporter!** Helpful Links: ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry - SLAM Procedure - Chlorine/CYA Chart
    40x20 Pool: 32K Gallons * Vinyl * Bleach Chlorination * Hayward S270T Sand Filter * Pentair SuperFlo 1 HP * Teledyne/Laars Heater * AquaVac Tigershark * TF-100 w/ SpeedStir
    Isolated Spa - 345 Gallons

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    Donldson's Avatar
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    Re: commercial pool

    The most important considerations before attempting to maintain a commercial pool using TFP are 1. As mentioned above what your local regulations are. Some are very specific, some more lenient. Many do not even allow CYA for indoor pools. You will have to be extremely careful to follow all local regulations. 2. Just as important, how much are you involved in the decision process? If you are 100% in charge of making the decisions with the pool then you might be able to work out a set of procedures that keep things withing TFPC guidelines as well as local regulations. If you are not as high up on the totem pole though you will have to defer to whoever is in charge, even if you know things could be run better. Offer suggestions, try to sway them, but don't get yourself fired over it.
    JD - 28' Round Above Ground Pool, 17,000 Gallons. Dual speed Jacuzzi pump with cartridge filter. Dual speed 1 HP pump, Hayward S210T sand filter
    Pool School - PoolMath - HIGHLY Recommended Test Kits

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    Patrick_B's Avatar
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    Re: commercial pool

    Welcome to TFP!

    These guys have you covered, but do feel free to stick around. There is a lot of good reading and tons of information here. If we can help, we will be glad too, just let us know.
    TFP Moderator
    Essential Links:
    ABC's Of Pool Chemistry, Test Kits, SLAM Your Pool
    28K Gal IG FreeForm, CLI Quartz, Pentair 36"SF & VS Pump, Dolphin M5, Rheem

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    Re: commercial pool

    Thanks for the replies.

    Mike
    90,000 gallon, in-ground, 3 pumps / sand filters, in-line chlorinator on #2. Learning on the job!

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    Re: commercial pool

    I maintain a semi-public pool at my condo complex. There are a few things that are a little bit different when using TFP on a commercial pool.

    1. For a private pool, you can decide your CYA level based on the amount of light you get, and then adjust your FC from there, according to the CYA/Chlorine chart. With a commercial pool, you need to look at the maximum FC allowed by your local health code, then look down the "shock FC" column of the chart, and set your target CYA level from that. So if your pool ever gets slightly cloudy, you can boost the FC close to shock level without closing the pool. If your county health code has a maximum FC of 5ppm, you'll need to keep your CYA at 20ppm or lower, which means you need to get a CYA test kit that can accurately measure that low.

    2. Check your local health code's minimum Total Alkalinity. Mine is 80ppm, which is a pain, because higher TA means pH rises faster, which means I have to add more acid, which reduces TA as well as pH, which means I have to add more baking soda to raise TA, which means pH rises faster, which means I have to add more acid, and so on..... What's worse is that the inspectors use a test kit that works by color matching, not titration like the Taylor kit, and their test reads 20ppm lower than the Taylor. So I have to keep my TA at 100ppm, which gets even more expensive. Fortunately, if your TA is found to be a bit low, it's not an immediate closure thing. They just mark it as "needing to be corrected before the next inspection". Anyway, the goal is to keep your TA as low as your health code allows AND keeps your pH stable.

    3. If you are currently using tablets for chlorination, and want to switch to liquid chlorine for the money savings and reduced need for water replacement, things are a bit more complicated than for a private pool. You'll need to file a "Plan Review" or permit application, which must be prepared by a "registered architect or registered professional engineer" licensed in your state. Then there's the plan review fee. Then you have to get a licensed professional to do the installation. Then the inspection of the completed work. All of which adds a good $750 or more above the cost of the actual chlorinating device. So you have to weigh the cost of replacing %40 of your water every year to reduce CYA with the cost of doing away with that problem permanently. Check with your inspector to see if you can switch chlorinating systems without having to do all the paperwork. Also, heat causes chlorine to lose its strength faster, so if your pump room gets hot like mine, you'll want to find a way to keep your liquid chlorine someplace cooler. (Tablets can handle heat no problem.)

    4. Check your health code to see if "hand-feeding" of chlorine is allowed. Some areas let you kick people out of the pool for 15 minutes while you add chlorine; others require an automated system, and hand-feeding is allowed only in emergency. Of course, low FC in your pool could be called an emergency, so hand-feeding as a supplement to an automated system will likely be allowed. Ask your county inspector the next time he/she visits. Of course, if you're open 24/7, this probably isn't your preferred option.

    5. Depending on your location, grocery-store bleach may be dramatically cheaper than more concentrated liquid chlorine, even if you buy the liquid in bulk. But there's still a fear among the uneducated that bleach isn't allowed. Look at the label of the bleach bottle and find the MSDS #. Then you can look that up and print out the master label for the product. The master label contains the labels for all the different approved packages for that chemical, including its use as a swimming pool sanitizer. If anyone questions the presence of bleach bottles in your pump room, show them the master label for your bleach, and how its use as a pool sanitizer is exactly the same as the 12.5% chlorine that happens to have that use listed directly on its bottle.


    LEGAL DISCLAIMER: This is just a few opinions based on the experience of managing one semi-public pool for a couple years. It should not be construed as legal advice, and neither I nor this site can be held liable for any problems you run into with your local inspector. Follow your local code carefully.
    25000-gallon semi-public IG concrete/plaster pool, Triton II sand filter
    750-gallon semi-public IG concrete/plaster spa, cartridge filter
    Volunteer pool caretaker for my condominium complex

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    mnasholm's Avatar
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    Re: commercial pool

    Welcome!

    If you can snap some pics of the pump/filter room. I would like to see a commercial pool system.
    Lomart 18x48 AGP 7000Gal
    Hayward S210T w/Hayward 1hp Power-Flo Matrix Pump 2-Speed
    TF-100 w/Speedstir!

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