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Thread: Bypass valve promote longevity of heaters?

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    justinfrancisjudd's Avatar
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    Bypass valve promote longevity of heaters?

    Quote Originally Posted by ps0303 View Post
    Not all pools with heaters, gas or electric, have by-pass valves plumbed into it. A bypass does allow you to divert water past the heater for several reasons but I have never heard anyone say that if you bypass some of the water it would heat up the pool faster. That doesn't make logical sense. It should take longer to heat that way as you are allowing the cool water to flow back to the pool without even slightly heating it.

    Some times you add a bypass to divert some of the water because the flow is too great and causes issues with the heater. They are also added in case you might need to perform a stain treatment of which you don't want acidic water flowing thru the copper in the heater.
    Im in the start of a pool build right now myself and have been doing a lot of reading on the corrosion of copper vs the cupro/nickel exchanger or titanium exchanger. There is a lot of worry amongst the forums with the swg's and increased corrosion in either of the above. Is a bypass valve becoming a standard so when the heater is not in use it can be bypassed all together and flushed so no pool water is running through it constantly? Is that something anyone is doing to promote longevity with their heaters?
    2015 Build, Stonescapes Mini Pebble-Blue Sea, 46.5'x23', 9' deep, Paramount IFCS on steps and shelfs, 8' spa with spillover, Quartzite Flagstone Coping and Patio, 3" Suctions and Returns, 1 skimmer, 6 Jandy LED Watercolor lights, Baja Shelf w/ diving rock, 2x 2HP Jandy VS E-Pump, Jandy LXI 400K BTU Heater Cupro/Nickel exchanger, Cartridge Filter, Grotto/Waterfall/ Slide, Jandy SWG, I-aqualink 2.0

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    Re: Heat pump bypass valve

    I have not seen any evidence that would substantiate the necessity of adding a bypass to prolong the life of a heater. Bypasses are good though if you should ever spring a leak in the heater and can't repair it right away. I feel it's best to run a heater for a short time every month instead of waiting 8 months and then you need it and it won't work.
    Paul
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    JasonLion's Avatar
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    Re: Bypass valve promote longevity of heaters?

    Heaters have a maximum flow rate, if you exceed that it is possible to damage the heater. Normally the max flow rate on the heater is higher than your pump can produce, so there is no issue. But in rare cases a very large pump could exceed the max flow rate on the heater and to avoid damage you would need to use a bypass valve. The only other longevity related issue would be bypassing the heater when your chemistry is way way out of balance, which will hopefully never come up, but can be handy if you actually need it.

    Heater corrosion is almost entirely a function of water chemistry getting way way out of balance. A SWG does nothing to promote corrosion of heaters in and of it's self. Copper heat exchangers can be damaged by low PH, which isn't something a SWG is going to cause but does tend to come up with trichlor tablets. All heaters can also sometimes be damaged by calcium scaling, which is really a chemistry problem though a SWG might contribute to scaling conditions to some extent.

    Most heaters have internal bypass setups which operate automatically. External bypass setups are getting a little more common than they used to be, but are still fairly rare. An external bypass can be automatic or manual. Most of the ones I see are manual. Manually controlled external bypass setups are getting more common because they can improve the overall pool system efficiency (i.e. save electricity) when the heater is turned off and bypassed.
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    justinfrancisjudd's Avatar
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    Re: Bypass valve promote longevity of heaters?

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonLion View Post
    Heaters have a maximum flow rate, if you exceed that it is possible to damage the heater. Normally the max flow rate on the heater is higher than your pump can produce, so there is no issue. But in rare cases a very large pump could exceed the max flow rate on the heater and to avoid damage you would need to use a bypass valve. The only other longevity related issue would be bypassing the heater when your chemistry is way way out of balance, which will hopefully never come up, but can be handy if you actually need it.

    Heater corrosion is almost entirely a function of water chemistry getting way way out of balance. A SWG does nothing to promote corrosion of heaters in and of it's self. Copper heat exchangers can be damaged by low PH, which isn't something a SWG is going to cause but does tend to come up with trichlor tablets. All heaters can also sometimes be damaged by calcium scaling, which is really a chemistry problem though a SWG might contribute to scaling conditions to some extent.

    Most heaters have internal bypass setups which operate automatically. External bypass setups are getting a little more common than they used to be, but are still fairly rare. An external bypass can be automatic or manual. Most of the ones I see are manual. Manually controlled external bypass setups are getting more common because they can improve the overall pool system efficiency (i.e. save electricity) when the heater is turned off and bypassed.

    Thanks! Makes sense! Im gunna go for it and try to get a bypass on the build, hopefully one thats auto and can be controlled by the i-aqualink
    2015 Build, Stonescapes Mini Pebble-Blue Sea, 46.5'x23', 9' deep, Paramount IFCS on steps and shelfs, 8' spa with spillover, Quartzite Flagstone Coping and Patio, 3" Suctions and Returns, 1 skimmer, 6 Jandy LED Watercolor lights, Baja Shelf w/ diving rock, 2x 2HP Jandy VS E-Pump, Jandy LXI 400K BTU Heater Cupro/Nickel exchanger, Cartridge Filter, Grotto/Waterfall/ Slide, Jandy SWG, I-aqualink 2.0

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