Become a TFP Supporter Pool Math Forum Rules Pool School
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Potassium Chloride

  1. Back To Top    #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    East TN
    Posts
    309

    Potassium Chloride

    Im hearing about people using potassium chloride instead of sodium chloride for salt in the pool. Doing some looking around it appears to be a salt substitute and related to water softeners.

    How much potassium chloride does it take to get the same ppm of salt as if you were using sodium chloride? It may say on a bag of it but I dont have one to look at.
    18,000 Gallon Aboveground. Sand Filter with 2HP 2 speed Pump.

  2. Back To Top    #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    San Rafael, CA USA
    Posts
    12,082

    Re: Potassium Chloride

    There is no good reason to use potassium chloride instead of sodium chloride for a pool and it's generally more expensive. It is the chloride that is used by a saltwater chlorine generator and you aren't drinking the pool water so potassium vs. sodium doesn't matter.

    It takes 1.276 times the amount of potassium chloride by weight compared to sodium chloride for the same quantity of ions in the water, but from a conductivity point of view it's roughly equal weight for potassium and sodium chloride.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

  3. Back To Top    #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    East TN
    Posts
    309

    Re: Potassium Chloride

    Ok thanks.

    So if I were to put 1,000 lbs sodium chloride in pool A and 1,276 lbs potassium chloride in pool B, they would both show the exact same salt ppm on a strip or test kit?

    Edit: Misread your post chemgeek. You said the chloride is what the SWG uses. Been a long day.
    Last edited by easttn; 09-24-2014 at 04:16 PM. Reason: Misread reply
    18,000 Gallon Aboveground. Sand Filter with 2HP 2 speed Pump.

  4. Back To Top    #4
    Melt In The Sun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    3,899

    Re: Potassium Chloride

    Ideally yes, if salt strips were perfectly accurate. You don't need potassium chloride, but you could use it if you want. The only time it might be a good idea is if you were on a strict low sodium diet and loved to chug pool water.
    11,200 gal, Pebble-Tec; Tristar 2-speed 1hp - Swimclear 325 ft2 cart - SWG - A & A in-floor cleaner - Heat pump. For the poolside cooking, a Yoder Wichita and a Big Steel Keg!
    TF Test Kits -- PoolMath -- Pool School
    Make each day your masterpiece. - John Wooden

  5. Back To Top    #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    East TN
    Posts
    309

    Re: Potassium Chloride

    It might cost you more but if the grocery store ran out of bananas then you would still be good to go.
    Thanks guys.
    18,000 Gallon Aboveground. Sand Filter with 2HP 2 speed Pump.

  6. Back To Top    #6

    Re: Potassium Chloride

    It partly depends on which SWG you have.

    SWGs, like the AquaRite determine salinity based on the production characteristics of the cell and water temperature. For that type of SWG, it's the chloride that matters.

    However, SWGs that have a separate salinity sensor, like the AutoPilot or Jandy AquaPure, detemine salinity based on conductivity, which is affected by all ions.

    The AquaPure and AutoPilot can be recalibrated to match the test, if necessary.

    It also depends on which salt test you're using. Test strips and the Taylor k-1766 measure chloride, whereas a meter uses conductivity.

    To be safe add less than you think you will need and retest to see what the amount added accomplished.

    As long as you use sodium chloride, everything should be fine. There's no benefit to using potassium chloride.

    In addition to extra cost, you could potentially have other problems. For example, although the AquaPure measures salinity using conductivity, it also assess the production characteristics of the cell and compares them to the expected characteristics based on the calculated salinity.

    Since the production characteristics are determined by chloride, there will be a mismatch, which could potentially cause the unit to halt production and display an error code indicating high or low current.

    In that case you could probably resolve the issue by recalibrating the salt to match the measured chloride level.

    For example, if you had an AquaPure and a starting salt of 200 ppm and wated the correct chloride level for 3400 ppm salt, you would add about 480 lb sodium chloride or about 615 lb potassium chloride. However, the salinity reading would be about 4300, which would cause a high salt error and possibly a low current error. Then you could recalibrate the salt to 3400 ppm.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •