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Thread: Zinc Anode Confusion...

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    Zinc Anode Confusion...

    I just ordered my AutoPilot RC52 SWG and am planning on installing everything in October once I close down for the summer, so Iíll be ready to go in the spring. When I spoke with my local pool company, they said I should use a zinc anode to help with corrosion. They use either the one that goes in the skimmer or the one that clamps to the ladder. I started researching these and, as you can imagine, found varying information everywhere I looked. From this, I have a few questions.

    I read that the skimmer ones are useless because they are not connected to the bonding system. Would the same be true for the ladder clamp type?

    I also saw the in-line ones that connect to the bonding system. Seems like a small price to pay if it helps Ė any drawbacks anyone knows about?

    Iíve also read it should be buried in the dirt and connected to the bonding system, but I read somewhere else that this is only good for plastic walls. I have steel walls.

    Anyone that has had a SWG for 5+ years share their experience with corrosion? Is keeping water balanced properly and hosing off rails, aluminum coping, mesh anchors and concrete deck weekly if thereís no rain all it takes?

    Anyone has any knowledge/experience that would be willing to share, it would be greatly appreciated.
    33K gal L-shaped (2008) IG vinyl | AutoPilot Digital SC60 SWG | 1 HP Sta-Rite Dura-Glass pump (model P2RA5E-181L) | 300 sqft Sta-Rite cartridge filter (model S7M120) | Dolphin Sprite cleaning robot | Merlin Smart Mesh winter cover

    South-Central PA

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    Join Date
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    Re: Zinc Anode Confusion...

    Since no one here seems to have an answer, I'd suggest you call an electrician. They might have an answer for you.

    This is a bit geeky, buy maybe your answer is in here:

    http://www.performancemetals.com/anodes/AnodeFAQs.shtml

    It does appear to me that all metal objects need to be wired together, but not necessarily to ground. It appears that the sacrificial anode substitutes for the "ground" as electric potential transfers from the most "noble" - stainless steel and brass to the least noble - the zinc anode, and reacts there instead.

    What metal do you have other than side walls and the ladder?
    SWG: CircuPool (May 2014) SI30+Plus; 3000ppm seems ideal;
    My Ideal Specs:
    FC 5; PH 7.4-7.6; TA 90; CH 350; CYA 75; = SI ~ 0.19
    14,000 gal, in ground, plaster, Cartridge filter, Borates
    TAYLOR K - 2006

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    Re: Zinc Anode Confusion...

    Far and away, proper pH balance at all times is more important than a sacrificial anode. Why do you think you need one?
    Dave S.
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
    TFTestkits , PoolMath , Pool School

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    Re: Zinc Anode Confusion...

    I have sacrificial anodes in my skimmer and on my ladder. The ones on the ladder see significantly more corrosion than the one In The skimmer. My ladder cups are metal and hence on the bonding grid, that may have something to do with it. I am installing the inline variety you mentioned in the spring when I replace my cheap ball valves with the Jandy no lubes.


    30x20 vinyl IG, Hayward SD60 with Pentair Dynamo 340219 2HP pump, Compupool CPSC24 SWG, Hayward H200FDN heater. APC automatic pool cover.
    Central Illinois

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    Re: Zinc Anode Confusion...

    Thanks for the link, chuckiechan. It was an interesting read, but I have more questions now. The only metal that is actually under-water is the ladder and the screws for the light and skimmer face. If those are the same type of metal, I would think an anode would not be needed. I don't know what types of screws are normally used there. If they're not aluminum (which I don't think they would be), then the aluminum ladder would be less noble than the screws, so the ladder would corrode?? Anyone else have any thoughts?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by duraleigh View Post
    Far and away, proper pH balance at all times is more important than a sacrificial anode. Why do you think you need one?
    I think I need one because I see so much discussed about it. But I also know that there is a lot of mis-information and misunderstanding out there, which is why I like this site so much. Please read my response to Chuckichan above to see if I'm on track or completely off-base. Thanks!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by bdex View Post
    I have sacrificial anodes in my skimmer and on my ladder. The ones on the ladder see significantly more corrosion than the one In The skimmer. My ladder cups are metal and hence on the bonding grid, that may have something to do with it. I am installing the inline variety you mentioned in the spring when I replace my cheap ball valves with the Jandy no lubes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks for sharing, bdex. I am leaning toward the in-line variety as well. I don't really see any drawbacks to doing so. It's a relatively minor cost (~$80, plus ~$40 every few years to replace the zinc) compared to replacing metal that has become corroded.

    Does anyone see any drawbacks from using a zinc anode? I appreciate any thoughts.
    33K gal L-shaped (2008) IG vinyl | AutoPilot Digital SC60 SWG | 1 HP Sta-Rite Dura-Glass pump (model P2RA5E-181L) | 300 sqft Sta-Rite cartridge filter (model S7M120) | Dolphin Sprite cleaning robot | Merlin Smart Mesh winter cover

    South-Central PA

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