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Thread: Pool Equipment info

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    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Troutman, NC
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    Pool Equipment info

    Forewarning - I do NOT yet own the house/pool - we're just a few days away from that, but I was able to get a picture today of the equipment pad and have a question about one item.

    Attachment 29545

    The white circle is the electrical connections and (hopefully) the pump timer
    The yellow is the circulation / filter pump
    The red is the sand ?? filter

    What is the blue circle?

    When we were at the house today, the water was green - I don't think the owner has done anything to the pool since WE paid to have it opened so that it could be inspected. I have one bag of shock for the day we go to settlement (closing) and will be ordering 3" tabs, shock, and test strips to be delivered the day after closing. We'll be busy with other stuff for 'a while' but I do want to get the pool cleaned up.

    Starting help would be much appreciated - including a link to the SLAM method (I missed that one !) mentioned in the SC new-pool (swamp ) owners post

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    Richard320's Avatar
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    San Dimas, CA (LA County)
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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    Welcome!

    The blue circled item is an inline chlorinator. You load them with pucks and it keeps the chlorine level up for you. It also raises the Cyanuric Acid level for you. Like many things in life, some is good, more is not always better. So it is with CYA.

    Cancel that order. Tablets are probably why the pool is green. "Shock" will aggravate it. And test strips are about as reliable as swishing a sample of pool water around in your mouth and tasting it. Back to Pool School with you. Start with the first couple pages - basic chemistry, and then how to Chlorinate and recommended pool chemicals. Then you'll be speaking our lingo.

    If you want to get ahead of the game, go to http://tftestkits.net/TF-100-Test-Kit-p4.html and order a TF100. Since the pool is green, you will need the XL option. Otherwise you'll run out of the chlorine reagent in the middle of the SLAM. You will note that a FAS-DPD test kit is required to do the SLAM. The TF100 has that. So does the Taylor K-2006, but it has smaller bottles, which is why it's cheaper. The speedstir is great, but not absolutely necessary. I'm sure your wallet is smarting right now anyway.

    While you unpack boxes and await the test kit, you can fumble around and make sure the pump works and nothing leaks. Then you can see what they left you for equipment. If you don't see a pole, a brush, a leaf rake, and a vacuum, start shopping. Big box hardware stores have a pool section, usually out in the garden department. Here's a Visual Encyclopedia that should help you identify any mystery items you find.

    Then start dragging the swamp with the leaf rake and get as much debris out as you can. It will speed up the SLAM process. Once the kit arrives, get a sample. That will guide you in deciding, based on facts, whether or not you need to replace any water or not, and how much of what you need to get ready to start dumping jugs of bleach in.

    Here's some lighter reading. Some even have pictures. We like pictures here.
    First Time Shocking with Bleach
    Pretty black pool
    A little encouragement for those with algae and new to BBB
    Frog Filled Green Swamp to Oasis---Work in Progress!!!
    Before and After Pool Pics
    Before and after!
    A final picture set of how well the BBB method works!
    16K freeform gunite with spa; Pentair 4000 DE filter; Century Whisperflow 1 HP; Pentair Minimax heater.
    Troublefree does not mean Maintenancefree. It's like brushing your teeth: You can spend a couple minutes a day and pennies a week or go to the dentist once a year and spend several thousand dollars.
    A pool is like a pet - you have to feed it every day, even the days you don't want to play with it!

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    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Pasco, WA
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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    I can't offer much technical advice as I'm fairly new here and new to the method, but I recommend you read the link that Richard posted called "first time shocking pool with bleach". It'll give you a great idea of what your in for to get your pool clean!
    18k gal, AG, Sand filter, Aqua Trol SWG, Installed 5/2014

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    Southern California
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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    Hry superman here is the link for the slam method.
    http://www.troublefreepool.com/conte...tain-shockingl

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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    just to re-iterate, I do not have access to the pool yet and the home seller isn't doing anything to the pool. When I was at the house about 10-14 days ago, the water was clear and the pump was running. When we were there yesterday, the water was green but the pump was still running.

    From reading ALL of the links that Richard provided, it sounds like the general theme is add Clorox (or generic at 6% minimum) until the water clears, then add Clorox every day during the season. Testing for chlorine, pH, and CYA is "assumed." (One question though - what is the BBB method (definition) - Bleach, Bleach, Bleach ???) So my plan of attack now will be
    1. Order the TF100 with XL
    2. Add water to pool to increase overflow at the skimmer
    3. Skim deep end with net to remove debris
    4. Add necessary Clorox - repeat til clear

    I'm hopeful that the amount of Clorox will be minimal because the pool is actually in very good condition. My biggest concern at this time is the CYA level - for the past several years that the pool was owned, they relied exclusively on a pool service company and from reading the implications in the above links, they maximize costs by selling chemicals.

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    Oct 2013
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    Chapin, SC
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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    Minimal? No telling until you get your test kit (you did order one, right?) And do a full set of tests and post the results here.
    Pool size: 24000gal inground Vinyl-Taylor k-2006 and k-1766 test kits and-speed stir
    Intermatic P1353ME digital timer w/freeze sensor
    CircuPool Si-45 SWCG System
    Polaris 280 vacuum/Polaris PB4-60 boost pump
    Pentair IntelliFlo VS 3hp Pump--Pentair sand filter

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    duraleigh's Avatar
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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    they relied exclusively on a pool service company and from reading the implications in the above links,
    Well, what most services do is over-stabilize a pool through the excessive use of pucks. More on that AFTER you get your kit and can report some current, valid test results.

    As you read, you will find TFPC centers aroeund the need for very good testing. We'll need that starting point.

    Meanwhile, I suggest you read "The ABC's of Pool Water Chemistry" up in Pool School. That'll give you a better overview of the chemistry involved.

    Next, read "SLAM" in the "How To" section up in Pool School. That is what you will do after you get some test results that will help us get you started.
    Dave S.
    42k vinyl and concrete pool, 1.5hp pump, 140gpm filter
    TFTestkits , PoolMath , Pool School

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    Richard320's Avatar
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    Re: Pool Equipment info

    Quote Originally Posted by GDSmith56 View Post
    just to re-iterate, I do not have access to the pool yet and the home seller isn't doing anything to the pool. When I was at the house about 10-14 days ago, the water was clear and the pump was running. When we were there yesterday, the water was green but the pump was still running.

    From reading ALL of the links that Richard provided, it sounds like the general theme is add Clorox (or generic at 6% minimum) until the water clears, then add Clorox every day during the season. Testing for chlorine, pH, and CYA is "assumed." (One question though - what is the BBB method (definition) - Bleach, Bleach, Bleach ???) So my plan of attack now will be
    1. Order the TF100 with XL
    2. Add water to pool to increase overflow at the skimmer
    3. Skim [st]deep end[/s] entire pool with net to remove debris
    4. Add necessary Clorox - repeat til clear

    I'm hopeful that the amount of Clorox will be minimal because the pool is actually in very good condition. My biggest concern at this time is the CYA level - for the past several years that the pool was owned, they relied exclusively on a pool service company and from reading the implications in the above links, they maximize costs by selling chemicals.
    You've got the important part in that last sentence!

    BBB is the old term for what is now the TFPC method. In brief, that means accurate testing and adding only what the pool needs from the cheapest source. To that end: bleach adds chlorine without any undesirable side effects (the only part); Borax raises pH and it's a lot cheaper than all the "pH up" products the pool store peddles. Baking soda is exactly the same as "Alkalinity Increaser" but without the spiffy packaging and at 1/4 the cost. But not everyone needs to add Baking Soda or Borax. My pool is a BA pool - bleach and acid - only. Too many people loaded up on the bleach and borax that they didn't need, thinking it was some magic potion that would zap the pool clean and keep it that way, hence the name change.

    A little more reading should slow down this and once you start doing, it will make sense. The revised order is

    1. Order the TF100 with XL
    1.5 Test the water. If CYA or CH are outrageously high from the use of powdered chlorine, do a partial drain.
    2. Add water to pool to increase overflow at middle of the skimmer
    3. Skim deep end entire pool with net to remove debris. Brush walls and floors.
    3.5 Adjust pH to mid 7's
    4. Add necessary Clorox to get to SLAM level- repeat til clear Continue to brush and vacuumm as visibility improves.

    It doesn't have to be bleach; Sometimes you stumble on a deal for "Pool Chlorine" or "Liquid Shock" that works out cheaper. It's all the same stuff, just different concentrations. This time of year in particular, you'll see good deals at hardware stores. And believe it or not, some independent pool stores sell chlorine at pretty competitive prices, and they have a good turnover so the stuff is fresh and full strength. ​http://www.troublefreepool.com/threa...iquid-chlorine
    16K freeform gunite with spa; Pentair 4000 DE filter; Century Whisperflow 1 HP; Pentair Minimax heater.
    Troublefree does not mean Maintenancefree. It's like brushing your teeth: You can spend a couple minutes a day and pennies a week or go to the dentist once a year and spend several thousand dollars.
    A pool is like a pet - you have to feed it every day, even the days you don't want to play with it!

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