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Thread: Florida Atlantic University Pool Circulation Efficiency Study

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    Florida Atlantic University Pool Circulation Efficiency Study

    Some eye popping claims in this research paper on Florida pools from 1984...such as...3-4 hours per day is more than adequate for chemical distribution; it isn't necessary to "turnover" a pool's volume (even once) in a day; >2 hours pump runtime results in imperceptible improvement in water quality.

    http://consensus.fsu.edu/FBC/Pool-Ef...on_systems.pdf

    Anyone ever used this paper's recommendations, if so what were the results?

    If there is an engineering study of this subject with a later date or if this one has been updated, it would be nice to have a web link.

    Thanks for any/all info.

    Rob S.

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    linen's Avatar
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    Re: Florida Atlantic University Pool Circulation Efficiency Study

    Pool school article: Determine Pump Run Time
    TFP Expert who uses Pool School and my TF100 test kit along with PoolMath for my: Round 11K gallon AGP with deep end, 20" sand filter, Matrix 1hp 2spd, 6 2ftX20ft solar panels (and solar cover!), Intex SWCG (copper bars disconnected) and a Rubadub hot tub (chlorine). The SLAM process is not finished until: 1. CC < 0.5 ppm, 2. An OCLT < 1.0 ppm and, 3. The water is crystal clear.

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    BoDarville's Avatar
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    Re: Florida Atlantic University Pool Circulation Efficiency Study

    Welcome to TFP!

    I have indeed used this paper's recommendations...and with good results. I began using this approach last year, typically running the pump anywhere from 30-60 minutes per day after adding chlorine and any other chemicals. I have a single-speed pump that always runs at high speed (3,450 RPM). For me, this amount of run time kept the pool as clear as ever with no trace of combined chloramines (CC's). However, I increased the pump run time considerably after unusually large bather loads. The Pool School article "Determine Pump Run Time" (http://www.troublefreepool.com/conte...-pump-run-time) was re-written last year as mounting evidence suggested that "turnovers per day" was a poor indicator of actual required pump run time.

    However, my pool's pump run time should not be interpreted as a blanket suggestion for all pools. There are other factors that need to be considered in determining the appropriate pump run time. Some of these factors include pool water volume, bathing loads, heavy rains, your general environment, whether you have a single-speed or multi-speed pump, and whether you have a salt water generator (SWG). Also realize that maintaining proper fee chlorine (FC) levels according to your pools stabilizer (CYA) level plays the leading role in the clarity of pool water. This is something I am very diligent about. A pool that is always maintained at the proper FC level where the pump is run for a relatively short period of time will look and be cleaner than a pool where the pump is run 24/7 but is inadequately chlorinated.

    For most pools, we recommend starting off with 4 hours of run time if your pump is single speed and 8 hours of run time if your pump is capable of running on lower speeds (i.e. two speed or variable speed pump). If this amount of run time is not sufficient to keep the pool clean enough for your preference, then gradually increase the pump run time until it is clean enough for your own tastes. Likewise, if the pool is crystal clear to your liking after running at 4 hours per day over the course of a week or so, then you can reduce the run time in half-hour increments and go with that for about a week. At the point when you notice that your pool is not clean enough for your preference (and all other factors were held rather steady), then revert back to the previous run time. This is the approach that I took. It will take some hands-on experimenting.
    Gold Supporter, TFP Lifetime Supporter, 26,680 gal Plaster IGP 3.5 - 10' depth / Attached Waterfall Spa, Manually Chlorinated, Triton Sand Filter, 1.5 HP * 1.1 SF = 1.65 SFHP 1-speed Pentair WhisperFlo WF-26 Pump, 400K BTU NG Teledyne Laars Series One Heater, Polaris 360, Test Kit Comparison, Chlorine/CYA Chart, SLAMing Your Pool, OCLT
    A good test kit is an investment, not an expense.

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    Re: Florida Atlantic University Pool Circulation Efficiency Study

    Many thanks for the replies!

    I have already re-adjusted the run time for my pump to 4 hours/day and will see what it looks like. It looks like I've been having the thing run waaaaay too long for waaaaaay too many years!

    Many thanks for the detailed response and the link to the run time post in this forum.

    So BoDarville, you only run your pool pump 30-60 minutes daily with good results? Did I read that right? That really is incredible and something I would have thought heretical had I heard it before running across the wealth of knowledge and info on this forum.

    Looking forward to keeping that money won't be sent to the local electrical utility!

    Regards,

    Rob S.

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    BoDarville's Avatar
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    Re: Florida Atlantic University Pool Circulation Efficiency Study

    Quote Originally Posted by aggies78 View Post

    So BoDarville, you only run your pool pump 30-60 minutes daily with good results? Did I read that right?
    Yes, that is correct. That is my run time under normal conditions during swim season. The bather load of our pool is rather light. During the swim season, it's usually just me and, to a lesser extent, my wife. When I'm swimming, it is usually lap swimming and that helps circulate the water. However, whenever we have pool parties or a heavy rain that washes surface and airborne debris into the water, I increase the run time considerably (usually up to 4-6 hours, sometime more). I go by the water clarity and not the run time, so I will run it as needed until the water clarity is to my liking.

    During the off-season, I keep the pool operational including keeping it properly chlorinated and balanced just as if it were swim season. If the temperatures stay above freezing and the winds are reasonably calm, I can go several days without running the pump. But I always run it during and after adding any chemicals.

    Just need to emphasize that every pool is different. I would start off the pump run time as described in the Pool School article and adjust it up/down as needed based on your pool's water clarity. I would run at a set level for at least a week before making any adjustments.
    Gold Supporter, TFP Lifetime Supporter, 26,680 gal Plaster IGP 3.5 - 10' depth / Attached Waterfall Spa, Manually Chlorinated, Triton Sand Filter, 1.5 HP * 1.1 SF = 1.65 SFHP 1-speed Pentair WhisperFlo WF-26 Pump, 400K BTU NG Teledyne Laars Series One Heater, Polaris 360, Test Kit Comparison, Chlorine/CYA Chart, SLAMing Your Pool, OCLT
    A good test kit is an investment, not an expense.

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