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Thread: When testing CC's

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    When testing CC's

    When I get the FC reading and add reagent 3 for the CC reading I can not tell any change in the color. I know something is growing in the pool. Why cant I see any change in the CC's? Am I misunderstanding something?
    BBB
    40x20 IG gunite pool
    35000 gallons
    2.5 HP pool pump and 3/4 HP booster pump for pool cleaner.
    Cartridge filters
    Huntsville Texas

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    Richard320's Avatar
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    Re: When testing CC's

    It might be dissipating in sunlight. Are you SLAMming the pool? In which case, worry more about the overnight loss; that will tell you if something's still growing.
    16K freeform gunite with spa; Pentair 4000 DE filter; Century Whisperflow 1 HP; Pentair Minimax heater.
    Troublefree does not mean Maintenancefree. It's like brushing your teeth: You can spend a couple minutes a day and pennies a week or go to the dentist once a year and spend several thousand dollars.
    A pool is like a pet - you have to feed it every day, even the days you don't want to play with it!

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    Join Date
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    Re: When testing CC's

    Quote Originally Posted by Smykowski
    ChemGeek put together a great post in the deep end that explains this:

    Combined chlorine (chloramine, dichloramine, and nitrogen trichloride) primarily results from Free Chlorine (aka hypochlorous acid) oxidizing nitrogen based componds, such as urine/urea) ammonia, sweat, etc. If all you are doing is killing algae and not oxidizing the above, it's very possible you won't ever see CC show up before, during, or after the SLAM process.
    12500 gallons, 24 foot round above ground
    Hayward Sand filter, Pentair OptiFlo 1HP 2-Speed pump

  4. Back To Top    #4

    Re: When testing CC's

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard320
    It might be dissipating in sunlight. Are you SLAMming the pool? In which case, worry more about the overnight loss; that will tell you if something's still growing.
    I'm not SLAMming. Just weekly testing. I related the reagent 3 test as a white blood cell count. If the white blood cell count is high, then perhaps there is an infection. If the CC's exist, perhaps there is something growing. IDK.
    BBB
    40x20 IG gunite pool
    35000 gallons
    2.5 HP pool pump and 3/4 HP booster pump for pool cleaner.
    Cartridge filters
    Huntsville Texas

  5. Back To Top    #5

    Re: When testing CC's

    Quote Originally Posted by scott.MI
    Quote Originally Posted by Smykowski
    ChemGeek put together a great post in the deep end that explains this:

    Combined chlorine (chloramine, dichloramine, and nitrogen trichloride) primarily results from Free Chlorine (aka hypochlorous acid) oxidizing nitrogen based componds, such as urine/urea) ammonia, sweat, etc. If all you are doing is killing algae and not oxidizing the above, it's very possible you won't ever see CC show up before, during, or after the SLAM process.
    I'm not SLAMing though.
    BBB
    40x20 IG gunite pool
    35000 gallons
    2.5 HP pool pump and 3/4 HP booster pump for pool cleaner.
    Cartridge filters
    Huntsville Texas

  6. Back To Top    #6

    Re: When testing CC's

    Quote Originally Posted by brian10
    I know something is growing in the pool.
    How do you know that something is growing in your pool? Do you see algae? Are you losing too much FC overnight?

    Has your FC ever dropped below 7.5 % of your CYA?

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    Re: When testing CC's

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesW
    Quote Originally Posted by brian10
    I know something is growing in the pool.
    How do you know that something is growing in your pool? Do you see algae? Are you losing too much FC overnight?

    Has your FC ever dropped below 7.5 % of your CYA?
    Yes, I see black algae. I have not bothered to check the FC loss overnight because I am aware something is there. Yes, my FC has dropped below 7.5% of my CYA of 40ppm on numerous occasions when I come home to a pool full of people on days that require a chlorine douse.
    BBB
    40x20 IG gunite pool
    35000 gallons
    2.5 HP pool pump and 3/4 HP booster pump for pool cleaner.
    Cartridge filters
    Huntsville Texas

  8. Back To Top    #8

    Re: When testing CC's

    Black algae can be one of the more difficult algaes (actually, it's a type of bacteria) to deal with. You need to go through the SLAM (shock) process. For black algae, it's important to brush at least once per day.

    Once you have cleared the pool of all algae, it's important to maintain a minimum of 7.5 % to 15 % of the CYA at all times. For a CYA of 40 ppm, that's 3 to 6 ppm. That means never below 3 ppm. I would target 6 ppm just to have that margin of safety.

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    Re: When testing CC's

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesW
    Black algae can be one of the more difficult algaes (actually, it's a type of bacteria) to deal with. You need to go through the SLAM (shock) process. For black algae, it's important to brush at least once per day.

    Once you have cleared the pool of all algae, it's important to maintain a minimum of 7.5 % to 15 % of the CYA at all times. For a CYA of 40 ppm, that's 3 to 6 ppm. That means never below 3 ppm. I would target 6 ppm just to have that margin of safety.
    Thank you. So what's your process when testing for CC's? Why am I not getting any change in color?
    BBB
    40x20 IG gunite pool
    35000 gallons
    2.5 HP pool pump and 3/4 HP booster pump for pool cleaner.
    Cartridge filters
    Huntsville Texas

  10. Back To Top    #10

    Re: When testing CC's

    Algae normally won't cause CC. CC is not a good indicator of the presence of algae. CC indicates the presence of ammonia and other such compounds.

    Algae is best identified visually or by excessive FC loss over night. However, some algae have very low chlorine demand. Black algae and small amounts of mustard algae will not consume much FC. The best thing to do is to prevent algae by always maintaining an FC higher than 7.5 % of the CYA.

    Right now, you need to do the SLAM (shock) process. Maintain FC at 40 to 60 % of the CYA until the water is crystal clear, there is no algae, there is no CC, and there is less than 1 ppm of FC lost overnight.

    pool-school/shocking_your_pool

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