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Thread: posphate

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    shane4's Avatar
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    posphate

    I have read through some posts and the pool school about posphate and understand this forum tends to ignore it yet the pool store deems it's removal as essential.

    Could someone explain a bit more on phosphates or direct me to previous posts/threads that I may have missed?

    Thanx
    16' x 32' IG, vinyl, 80k litre (21k gal), "lazy L" (kidney like at deep, squared off at shallow) shallow 3', deep 8', Hayward sand filter 300 lbs, 20gal/min Mod S-244T, Pentair Superflow VS 1.5 HP Model 342001, Raypak Heater 266K BTU Mod P-R266A-EN-C, 2 returns, 1 skimmer, 1 main drain, diving board, Southern Ontario (Canada) climate.

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    AimeeH's Avatar
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    Re: posphate

    I'm not an expert so somebody may correct me but phosphates provide nutrients for algae to grew. With that being said algae won't grow at a properly maintained chlorine level according to your cya level. The pool store is trying to make money on something you shouldn't need.
    18*36*23 true "L" vinyl IG 29,000 gallons. SWG. TF-100 test kit.
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    Richard320's Avatar
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    Re: posphate

    Aimee gets a gold star.

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    16K freeform gunite with spa; Pentair 4000 DE filter; Century Whisperflow 1 HP; Pentair Minimax heater.
    Troublefree does not mean Maintenancefree. It's like brushing your teeth: You can spend a couple minutes a day and pennies a week or go to the dentist once a year and spend several thousand dollars.
    A pool is like a pet - you have to feed it every day, even the days you don't want to play with it!

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    linen's Avatar
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    Re: posphate

    Basically, if you do not maintain an adequate FC level (as taught on tfp), then phosphate levels could matter since it is an algae nutrient. However, some (maybe most) phosphate removers only remove inorganic phosphate and don't touch the organic phosphates which are also algae nutrients. In addition to phosphates, one would also need to keep nitrate levels low since that is also a nutrient for algae. See: http://www.troublefreepool.com/new-p...14.html#p90056

    My opinion is the reason pool stores talk about it (and sell removers) is that it can be a good/steady money maker.
    TFP Expert who uses Pool School and my TF100 test kit along with PoolMath for my: Round 11K gallon AGP with deep end, 20" sand filter, Matrix 1hp 2spd, 6 2ftX20ft solar panels (and solar cover!), Intex SWCG (copper bars disconnected) and a Rubadub hot tub (chlorine). The SLAM process is not finished until: 1. CC < 0.5 ppm, 2. An OCLT < 1.0 ppm and, 3. The water is crystal clear.

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    Re: posphate

    Say you've got a wood pile -- that's phosphates (and nitrates) -- representing algae nutrients.

    Say you've got sparks flying into that wood pile -- those sparks are live algae blown into the pool.

    Say you're spraying that wood pile with a fine mist of water -- that's chlorine.

    So long as you've got enough water to put out the sparks (i.e. enough active chlorine to kill algae), then the size of the wood pile (i.e. phosphates) is irrelevant. You won't start a fire.

    If the active chlorine level gets too low so doesn't put out the sparks and they instead turn into flames, then it will take a higher active chlorine level (a lot more water) to put out the resulting fire (algae bloom). However, once that fire is out, you can lower the active chlorine level back down to the level needed to put out the sparks.

    Yes, you can use a phosphate remover to lower the amount of wood in the wood pile, but it's not necessary so long as you maintain the proper active chlorine level. So a phosphate remover needs to be viewed in the same way as an algaecide -- it's insurance if you are unable or unwilling to maintain a proper FC/CYA level, but it's not necessary. And, of course, it's extra cost. And as was pointed out, it's not 100% reliable because if the chlorine level gets to zero, then bacteria can convert organic phosphates (which phosphate removers don't touch) into orthophosphate that algae uses for growth.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

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    shane4's Avatar
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    Re: posphate

    Perfectly explained, thanks all!
    16' x 32' IG, vinyl, 80k litre (21k gal), "lazy L" (kidney like at deep, squared off at shallow) shallow 3', deep 8', Hayward sand filter 300 lbs, 20gal/min Mod S-244T, Pentair Superflow VS 1.5 HP Model 342001, Raypak Heater 266K BTU Mod P-R266A-EN-C, 2 returns, 1 skimmer, 1 main drain, diving board, Southern Ontario (Canada) climate.

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