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Thread: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

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    CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    I understand that CH is for plaster type pools but is there and reason to have in in vinyl pools?

    Do I even need to adjust this?
    19,000 gal - Vinyl IG - Sand filter -1.5hp. - Taylor k 2006 - Loop Loc cover

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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    If it is too high it can cause scaling/buildup, but I don't think it can be too low. I just ignore it on mine.
    5K gal, 16' x 48" AG Intex Ultra Frame, vinyl, Intex SWG 2500 GPH cartridge filter / pump combo (copper power wires removed)

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    Isaac-1's Avatar
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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    There is some information that says you may want to keep a minimum of 50 ppm CH even in vinyl pools, but as long as you are above this fairly low minimum you should not worry. I just found myself adding CH to my vinyl pool last week when my CH tested out at 40 (I have very soft water) , so I raised it to about 60 just in case.

    Ike
    Indoor 20x40 35,000 gallon vinyl pool with 1.5 HP 2 speed Jandy FloPro pump, Hayward EC75 Perflex DE filter, 11 4x12 Techno-Solis solar panels w/ Aquasolar controller, Aquabot Turbo T Robot Cleaner. Also LMI metering chlorine dispenser pump and HotSpring Jetsetter
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    jcowart's Avatar
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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    It's not really needed. I would have at least 50ppm in it though. I was told by the pool
    store that it would pull it out of the liner. I just laughed and walked out. I would just
    use the poolcalculator and cal-hypo once a week to bring it up some without having to
    buy calcium increaser. It also helps figuring your csi if you keep up with that number.
    17500 gallon Doughboy AGP, Hayward DE filter, waiting for the 1.5hp DB pump to go out.
    Learn to take the advice here and be trouble free or use the pool store's advice. "You can't do both and get very far"

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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    Yea , thanks everyone, I already have some that my neighbor gave me, so I think I will add the min. Based on the pool calc. min.
    19,000 gal - Vinyl IG - Sand filter -1.5hp. - Taylor k 2006 - Loop Loc cover

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    mickey4paws's Avatar
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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    Does anyone know if low CH can be bad for a heat exchanger in a heater? Someone told me that, but I don't know if it's true or not. I have a vinyl pool and CH of 100.
    IG 12' x 39' - 20k Gallons - Vinyl Lined - StaRite Cristal-Flo II 26" Sand Filter - Hayward SuperPump 1 hp - Dolphin Dynamic autocleaner - Lochinvar Energyrite gas heater - Aqua Rite SWCG T-15 - TF100 Test Kit - Skimlite Duallly 9016 pole (great pole)

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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    Quote Originally Posted by mickey4paws
    Does anyone know if low CH can be bad for a heat exchanger in a heater? Someone told me that, but I don't know if it's true or not. I have a vinyl pool and CH of 100.
    It's not true. Saturating the water with calcium carbonate protects plaster and grout surfaces that contain calcium carbonate from dissolving. The idea of saturating the water to provide a thin layer that protects metal from corrosion is at best controversial (see this link for some expert discussion). Basically, low pH is the worst for metal corrosion, assuming oxidizers are present (dissolved oxygen, chlorine, etc.). The next worst is having higher conductivity as from a higher TDS or salt level. For stainless steel in particular, a high chloride level is more corrosive.

    If you have a non-SWG pool so have generally lower salt levels, then a copper heat exchanger should do fine. Remember that tap water used to be chlorinated at 1 ppm FC or so without any CYA so was 10 times higher in active chlorine level than our typical outdoor residential pools, yet copper pipes did not corrode. This was mostly because the pH was usually kept above 7.5 (typically 7.8 to 8.0) and sometimes corrosion inhibitors were added, such as phosphates. My tap water only has 55 ppm CH and a saturation index of -0.7. For SWG pools, copper sometimes is OK, but using cupro-nickel or titanium heat exchangers would be more resistant to the higher conductivity from the higher salt levels.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

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    mickey4paws's Avatar
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    Re: CH in a Vinyl pool ?

    Quote Originally Posted by chem geek
    Quote Originally Posted by mickey4paws
    Does anyone know if low CH can be bad for a heat exchanger in a heater? Someone told me that, but I don't know if it's true or not. I have a vinyl pool and CH of 100.
    It's not true. Saturating the water with calcium carbonate protects plaster and grout surfaces that contain calcium carbonate from dissolving. The idea of saturating the water to provide a thin layer that protects metal from corrosion is at best controversial (see this link for some expert discussion). Basically, low pH is the worst for metal corrosion, assuming oxidizers are present (dissolved oxygen, chlorine, etc.). The next worst is having higher conductivity as from a higher TDS or salt level. For stainless steel in particular, a high chloride level is more corrosive.

    If you have a non-SWG pool so have generally lower salt levels, then a copper heat exchanger should do fine. Remember that tap water used to be chlorinated at 1 ppm FC or so without any CYA so was 10 times higher in active chlorine level than our typical outdoor residential pools, yet copper pipes did not corrode. This was mostly because the pH was usually kept above 7.5 (typically 7.8 to 8.0) and sometimes corrosion inhibitors were added, such as phosphates. My tap water only has 55 ppm CH and a saturation index of -0.7. For SWG pools, copper sometimes is OK, but using cupro-nickel or titanium heat exchangers would be more resistant to the higher conductivity from the higher salt levels.
    Thanks very much, Chem Geek, I appreciate your response and the article. Our heater has a copper heat exchanger, I believe. We do have a SWG and try to keep our PH at 7.6 to 7.8 and salt around 3200. Hopefully the heat exchanger will last a while. Kind of wish we'd gotten one with the cupro-nickel.
    IG 12' x 39' - 20k Gallons - Vinyl Lined - StaRite Cristal-Flo II 26" Sand Filter - Hayward SuperPump 1 hp - Dolphin Dynamic autocleaner - Lochinvar Energyrite gas heater - Aqua Rite SWCG T-15 - TF100 Test Kit - Skimlite Duallly 9016 pole (great pole)

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