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Thread: Polaris Pressure Cleaner or or Robotic cleaner?

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    Polaris Pressure Cleaner or or Robotic cleaner?

    I think I have decided to stick with a Polaris pool cleaner. With the research I have done and the people I have spoke with it seems like Polaris would work best in my situation. The pool is being built now and there was a separate PVC line run with a quick disconnect just for a Polaris. The pool company suggested the Polaris 380, but am I better off going with a robotic cleaner? My pool is going to be 28k gallons and there are NO trees anywhere! The property is fairly new and the only trees in my yard are the 30+ arborvitaes I planted last year for some privacy. I have a weeping willow and two birch trees all less then a couple of years old so they aren't very mature yet.

    Thanks for your help & suggestions!

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    BoDarville's Avatar
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    Re: Polaris Pressure Cleaner or or Robotic cleaner?

    coondogg97:

    Since your pool is already set up for a Polaris, I would go with that.

    Even though you have no trees anywhere, you will still be surprised at what gets in the pool.

    One concern I would have is, how close/far is the weeping willow from the pool or plumbing? Reason I ask is weeping willows are notorious for invasive root systems that can wreak havoc with underground plumbing and the pool itself. Those roots will aggressively seek out any water source. If it is anywhere near the pool or plumbing equipment, I would have it replanted to another part of the yard while it is still young. If that is not an option and it is close to the pool / plumbing equipment, then (and I hate to say this) I would have it removed.

    They are nice trees, but are best suited for lots with acreage where they can be planted far enough from the house and underground plumbing.
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    Re: Polaris Pressure Cleaner or or Robotic cleaner?

    Quote Originally Posted by BoDarville
    coondogg97:

    Since your pool is already set up for a Polaris, I would go with that.

    Even though you have no trees anywhere, you will still be surprised at what gets in the pool.

    One concern I would have is, how close/far is the weeping willow from the pool or plumbing? Reason I ask is weeping willows are notorious for invasive root systems that can wreak havoc with underground plumbing and the pool itself. Those roots will aggressively seek out any water source. If it is anywhere near the pool or plumbing equipment, I would have it replanted to another part of the yard while it is still young. If that is not an option and it is close to the pool / plumbing equipment, then (and I hate to say this) I would have it removed.

    They are nice trees, but are best suited for lots with acreage where they can be planted far enough from the house and underground plumbing.

    Bo,

    Thanks for the reply. By suggesting the Polaris I assume the 380 will be adequate?

    As for the weeping willow, it is away from the pool, but not far from the plumbing. It is about two years old and this year has a nice bark on it. I have enough space to move it more then far enough from the equipment, but is it young enough to do so?

    Thanks again!

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    BoDarville's Avatar
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    Re: Polaris Pressure Cleaner or or Robotic cleaner?

    Quote Originally Posted by coondogg97
    I have enough space to move it more then far enough from the equipment, but is it young enough to do so?
    I would check with a certified arborist on that one. In either case, that job is best left to a professional. If they state that moving it is not an option, ask if they could install a root barrier that would keep the roots away from the pool & plumbing equipment.

    As for the Polaris 380, that should work just fine. Note that it will require a separate booster pump.

    My pool came with a Polaris 360 which works well. The difference is that a 360 does not require a separate booster pump.
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    harleysilo's Avatar
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    Re: Polaris Pressure Cleaner or or Robotic cleaner?

    How tall is the willow? How thick is the trunk? If it's been in the ground for just 2 years this is the first year it will really start to grow. This is the year to move it, before it gets any bigger.

    In my opinion the best way to move a tree/shrub/bush is to first determine approximately how big the original hole it was planted in was. Perhaps you remember the bucket size it came in? Probably 3 gallon, 5 gallon, or it was balled in burlap. Then in the fall you take a nice flat long shovel and cut a circle around the tree, going as deep as the shovel allows. The key is skipping a shovel width as you cut the circle. So you jump on the shovel drive it in, pull it out, then skip the width of the shovel and repeat. _ _ _ _ _ _ < except in a circle. This way you only cut ~1/2 the roots at a time. Couple months later you do it again, except you change up the pattern so you are cutting the remaining roots. You leave the tree where it is till spring when you replant it, by once again cutting the entire circle, and then attempting to lift the tree out of the hole. Depending on the species there maybe a tap root in the center that you may have to cut with the shovel or some large branch trimmers. If upon lifting you feel resistance (big tap root, or other uncut roots you couldn't get with the initial cutting (digging) you can dig a hole beside the circle to gain better access with your shovel to cut the offending root. Once the root ball is free from the earth lift the tree up and set it on an old towel or sheet that you can wrap around the root ball to assist in moving it to the new hole.

    The key is to disturb the root ball as little as possible. Sometimes the ground will be too wet, sometimes it will be too dry, really depends on your soil. You don't want the root ball to fall apart.

    There is debate as to what soil to use to replant a tree. Some recent research i have seen suggests to only use your native soil when planting. The logic is that if you fill the hole with a bunch of supper rich planting soil/mulch etc. the roots don't have to grow out to find nutrients. I have personally seen this when redoing several year old landscaping, where you can just walk up to a shrub and pull it right up, cause it never grew out of the original hole. Might not be an issue on a tree with an invasive roots system

    At this point it's really to late to do all that, i'd just dig it up carefully, and replant, and keep it watered. The root ball is going to be heavy. You could drag it carefully in the old towel or sheet or tarp, or you could put it on a dolley or wheel barrow or wagon to move. Have fun!


    Disclaimer: I'm not an arborist, i did grow up on a Christmas tree farm and have dug up 100's of Christmas trees up to 8' tall. And all that nonsense above we did not do for the xmas trees, that is stuff i learned for how to successfully dig up wild trees to use for Bonzi.
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